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College of Liberal Arts
University of Mississippi

Event Calendar

If you have questions or require assistance relating to a disability, please contact the College of Liberal Arts at ventress@olemiss.edu or (662) 915-1778, or contact the phone or email that may be listed for the particular event. 

  • Wed
    11
    Nov
    2020
  • Thu
    12
    Nov
    2020
  • Sat
    14
    Nov
    2020
    4:00 pmZoom

    04/08/2021 Prof. Tim Stemmler (Wayne State) will present a seminar to the department

    4:00 pm, Zoom, https://chemistry.olemiss.edu/

  • Mon
    16
    Nov
    2020
    2:00 pmZoom
  • Tue
    17
    Nov
    2020
    6:00 pmZoom

    Dr. Joshua Sharp Director of the Glycoscience Center of Research Excellence (GlyCORE),Associate Professor of Pharmacology, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Mississippi:

    COVID-19 and heparan sulfate: the carbohydrate handle that SARS-CoV-2 uses to grab your cells

    COVID-19, the disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, has killed over 200,000 Americans in 2020 and changed the way we live our lives. An incredible effort from the scientific community has allowed us to learn a lot about the virus in a very short time. While there are many questions remaining about the disease, we have enough evidence to start answering some important questions. Where do COVID-19 infections usually start in the body? How does SARS-CoV-2 find and enter the target cells? Here, we will discuss what we know (and think we know) about how COVID-19 infections get established. We will also discuss the discovery and initial development of intranasal heparin, a well-known anti-coagulant injectable that is now in early clinical trials as an intranasal drug to prevent COVID-19. We will discuss how heparin works to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection of cells, why it should be safe to administer intranasally, and why it might NOT be useful as a treatment of advanced COVID-19.

    November 17, 2020, 6:00pm - 7:00pm
    Via Zoom

    https://www.phy.olemiss.edu/oxfordsciencecafe/

  • Tue
    17
    Nov
    2020
    7:30 pmFord Center for the Performing Arts

    Reserved tickets required. Call 662-915-7411. Free admission.

  • Fri
    20
    Nov
    2020
    2:00 amZoom
  • Mon
    14
    Dec
    2020
    Thu
    17
    Dec
    2020

    A conference called "Astrobiology: Philosophical Issues and Implications," set for late March 2020 at the University of Mississippi, will now being held virtually December 14-17, 2020.

    The conference includes over three dozen presentations by individual experts from over a dozen countries. They represent a wide array of scientific disciplines, according to Neil Manson, the University of Mississippi philosophy professor who has worked to organize the event.

    "Topics include the questions surrounding the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, the debate over whether we should attempt to send messages into space in the hope that they will be received by extraterrestrial intelligence, and whether and to what extent we are obliged to protect the planets we explore," Manson said. "We will also explore the ethical, legal and social implications of off-world settlements and even the very nature of life itself."

    The conference is the third annual meeting of the Society for Social and Conceptual Issues in Astrobiology, or SSoCIA. The newest academic organization dedicated to examining astrobiology and space exploration, SSoCIA began in 2016 with an inaugural conference at Clemson University and held its second meeting in 2018 at the University of Nevada at Reno.

    For more information on the conference, contact Neil Manson at namanson@olemiss.edu.

  • Fri
    15
    Jan
    2021
    Sun
    17
    Jan
    2021
    Intensive training opportunity for emerging artists features leading baritone, Lucas Meachem, and pianist Irina Meachem
    The Metropolitan Opera :: Salzburg Festival :: NY Philharmonic
    San Francisco Opera :: GRAMMY Award-winner
    The Living Music Institute offers emerging musicians an intensive training experience designed to help them take their professional musicianship to the next level. Soprano Nancy Maria Balach co-founded the Institute with her UM Music faculty colleague, collaborative pianist and vocal coach Amanda Johnston.
    LMI brings young musicians from across the U.S. and Canada to UM to work with Balach and Johnston and noted guest artists. This year's guest clinicians are of the highest caliber: baritone Lucas Meachem is among opera's most celebrated stars, and pianist Irina Meachem is a renowned collaborative pianist.
    The 2021 Institute will be January 15-17, 2021, and for the first time, LMI will accept applications from instrumentalists as well as singers.
    Because of Covid-19, LMI's trademark feedback and training will be delivered online. Luckily, LMI's parent organization, the Living Music Resource™, has always been committed to online experiences that connect people no matter the location, and Lucas and Irina Meachem are pros at conducting virtual performances, conversations, and events with partners such as the San Francisco Opera/Merola Opera Program.
    Not only are the Meachems acclaimed performers, they are also advocates for greater diversity within classical music. The couple founded The Perfect Day Music Foundation to explore classical music as a way to "address current issues through a traditional art form." To this end, they champion composers of color and sponsor competitions, blogs and events that hand the spotlight to classical singers of color.
    "The Meachems are a fantastic example of artists who excel in their art form, and then use that art form to make a difference in the world around them," said Balach. "They are dream partners who exemplify the concept of 'The Performer as Entrepreneur,' and their willingness to engage individually with the LMI participants is truly unique."
    This is the second year that the Living Music Institute will coach participants not only on technique, tone, and performance, but will also support them as entrepreneurs who want to put their music to work. "We will award both a Performance Winner and an Entrepreneurial Winner -- both carry cash prizes," Balach said.
  • Tue
    19
    Jan
    2021
    Fri
    05
    Feb
    2021
    Gallery 130 Meek Hall

    Department of Art & Art History Spring 2021 MFA Student Show

    Gallery 130 is open M–F, 8 AM to 5 PM. You can view the exhibition in-person, masked, and with social distancing.

  • Tue
    19
    Jan
    2021
    6:00 pm

    Invitation: Science is fun at the Oxford Science Cafe! Come and join us for a presentation by Dr. Wayne Gray, instructional assistant professor, from the UM Biology Department. He will be talking to us on "Understanding Vaccines: Preventing Diseases from Smallpox to COVID-19."

    These days everyone is talking about vaccines and hoping for an end to the COVID-19 pandemic. Vaccines are a miracle of modern medicine. At this month’s science café, we’ll address several questions concerning vaccines: How do they work to prevent disease? How safe are vaccines and why do some people have concerns about vaccines? What is herd immunity? What are the various types of vaccines? We’ll review the history of vaccines and discuss several of the more than 20 vaccines that are now routinely given to children and adults. Finally, we’ll examine the current COVID-19 vaccines and consider their effectiveness and safety. Issues regarding COVID-19 vaccine distribution will be discussed.
    When: Tuesday, January 19, 2020, 6pm - 7pm CT.
    Where: Zoom! Meeting ID: 975 6831 5885 
    or click on the following link: https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/97568315885
    Cost: Free!

    Oxford Science Café: Monthly conversations about the science we know and
    the science we don't know. Everyone is invited, and children are welcome!
    Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.
  • Wed
    20
    Jan
    2021
    4:00 pm

    Two Southern Studies virtual open houses are planned. The first option is Wednesday, Jan. 20 at 4 p.m. CST and the second option is Friday, Jan. 22 at 1 p.m. CST. Both events are opportunities for people to ask questions and learn more about the graduate programs at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture. To register, click here.

  • Fri
    22
    Jan
    2021
    1:00 pm

    Two Southern Studies virtual open houses are planned. The first option is Wednesday, Jan. 20 at 4 p.m. CST and the second option is Friday, Jan. 22 at 1 p.m. CST. Both events are opportunities for people to ask questions and learn more about the graduate programs at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture. To register, click here.

  • Wed
    27
    Jan
    2021
    12:00 pm

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) exploring the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public.

    Due to COVID-19, we’ve gone virtual. To watch the prerecorded talks, click in the individual event below or visit our YouTube channel, and register here to receive the link for live Q&A with presenters.

    In early 1960 Black students across the nation launched nonviolent direct-action campaigns in more than seventy cities across the nation, challenging Jim Crow segregation and violence. These students took courageous action knowing they would face arrest, expulsion, or even lose their lives. So why did they do it? Anthony Siracusa argues that the political philosophy of religious nonviolence was a key motivation for many. Siracusa excavates the history of this idea in his forthcoming book, Nonviolence Before King: The Politics of Being and the Black Freedom Struggle, and explains how what he calls a “politics of being” came to occupy a central place in the Black freedom struggle.

    A historian of modern America and a civic engagement professional in higher education, Anthony Siracusa works at the intersection of the community and the academy. He has written extensively about nonviolence and the Black freedom movement, and his first book, Nonviolence Before King: The Politics of Being and the Black Freedom Struggle, will be released by UNC Press in June 2021. He teaches a variety of courses on African American history, religion, and politics in addition to community-based learning courses. He also develops and administers projects and programs in partnership with communities beyond the campus to enhance student learning and strengthen community impacts. Siracusa is a native of Memphis, Tennessee, and lives in Oxford, Mississippi.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Thu
    28
    Jan
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    01/28/2021 Prof. Ellen Sletten (UCLA) will present a seminar to the chemistry department

  • Tue
    09
    Feb
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    Feb. 9, 4:00 p.m., the Department of Philosophy and Religion is hosting a webinar with Dr. Frances Flannery, from James Madison University, "Peacebuilding in an Era of Radical Right Extremism:  Where to Go From Here."  Dr. Flannery specializes in violent extremism and apocalyptic movements.  Registration is required (easy and free) and the link is included below; it's also available on myolemiss.

    You are invited to a Zoom webinar.

    When: Feb 9, 2021 04:00 PM Central Time (US and Canada)
    Topic: Dr. Frances Flannery, James Madison University

    Peacebuilding in an Era of Radical Right Extremism: Where to Go From Here

     

    On January 6, 2021, tens of thousands streamed to Washington DC to speak out against what they saw as a fraudulent election that would unfairly elect Joe Biden as President and oust Donald Trump. Among the protestors were representatives of violent organizations, including Christian Nationalists, QAnon, and white supremacist hate groups who would proceed to commit domestic terrorism by storming the Capitol building in search of Congresspersons to attack, punish, and even kill. This lecture will explain the apocalyptic roots of radical right extremism to understand what makes the ideology of violent extremism appealing to so many, what we can expect in the future, and how we can finally begin to stem the cycle of radicalization and heal our nation.

    Register in advance for this webinar:
    https://olemiss.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_7fpVVxwOR7eV_X_izFXsiA

     

  • Wed
    10
    Feb
    2021
    12:00 pm@Online

    SouthTalks: “Southern Journey: The Migrations of the American South, 1790–2020” @ Online
    Feb 10 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

    In this talk, Edward L. Ayers narrates the evolution of southern history from the founding of the nation to the present day by focusing on the set­tling, unsettling, and resettling of the South. Using migration as the dominant theme of southern his­tory and including Indigenous, white, Black, and immigrant people in the story, Ayers cuts across the usual geographic, thematic, and chronological boundaries that subdivide southern history.

    Ayers explains the major contours and events of the southern past from a fresh perspective, weav­ing geography with history in innovative ways. He uses unique color maps created with sophisticated tools to in­terpret massive data sets from a humanistic per­spective, providing a view of movement within the South with a clarity, detail, and continuity we have not seen before. The South has never stood still; it is—and always has been—changing in deep, radical, sometimes contradictory ways, often in divergent directions. Ayers will be in conversation with Ted Ownby, professor of history and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi.

    Edward L. Ayers has been named National Professor of the Year, received the National Humanities Medal from President Obama at the White House, won the Bancroft, Beveridge, and Lincolns Prizes in American history, was a finalist for the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize, served as president of the Organization of American Historians, and worked as the founding chair of the board of the American Civil War Museum. He is executive director of New American, dedicated to sharing innovative work in words, maps, audio, and video with broad audiences and the nation’s schools. He is Tucker-Boatwright Professor of the Humanities and president emeritus at the University of Richmond, as well as a former dean of arts and sciences at the University of Virginia.

    Ted Ownby is William F. Winter Professor of History and Southern Studies, coeditor of The Mississippi Encyclopedia, and author of Hurtin’ Words: Debating Family Problems in the Twentieth-Century South and other works.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Wed
    10
    Feb
    2021
    5:00 pm

    Join the Department of Classics for a bardic performance of original songs based on Homer's Iliad, with discussion following. (mpranger@olemiss.edu).

    Join us on Zoom (https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/95241795849) or for a live watch-party in Bryant 209 (maximum 30 in person; performance will still be remote).
    If you plan to watch live please register by emailing mpranger@olemiss.edu.

    For assistance related to a disability, contact Molly Pasco-Pranger: mpranger@olemiss.edu | 662-915-7097

  • Thu
    11
    Feb
    2021
    12:00 pm@ Online

    SouthTalks: “Protests in Pro Football, 1965–2020” @ Online

    Feb 11 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

    Chuck Ross’s “Protests in Pro Football, 1965–2020” talk examines both the events leading up to the 1965 American Football League All-Star game protest and the events that led to Colin Kapernick’s 2016 NFL protest. Ross will also discuss the legacy of Kapernick’s actions in the wake of the death of George Floyd and the different responses by professional sports leagues and teams in America.

    Chuck Ross is a native of Columbus, Ohio, and currently is professor of history and African American studies at the University of Mississippi. He holds a B.A. in history from Stillman College. He has an M.A. in Black studies, an M.A. in history, and a Ph.D. in history, each from The Ohio State University. He is the author of, Mavericks, Money, and Men: The AFL, Black Players, and the Evolution of Modern Football, which was published by Temple University Press in 2016, and Outside the Lines: African Americans and the Integration of the National Football League, which was released by New York University Press in 1999. His teaching interests include twentieth-century US history, African American history, and sports history. He has appeared on ESPN’s Outside the Lines and on ESPN Radio.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Thu
    11
    Feb
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    02/11/2021 Prof. Vikas Nanda (Rutgers) will present a seminar to the department

    4:00 pm, Zoom, https://chemistry.olemiss.edu/

  • Wed
    17
    Feb
    2021
    12:00 pm@ Online

    SouthTalks: “Masked Man, Black: Pandemic and Protest Poems” @ Online

    Feb 17 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

    Frank X Walker will read from and discuss his latest collection of poems, Masked Man, Black: Pandemic and Protest Poems. The poems document in real time the myriad of challenges presented by the multiple pandemics of Covid-19 and racial injustice. They also offer edifying pockets of solace as the poet shares his family’s survival tips, strategies, and discoveries in midst of so much loss, while properly laying blame at the feet of the administration that unnecessarily politicized, misled, and further complicated this country’s response to the virus. University of Mississippi associate professor of English and African American studies Derrick Harriell will facilitate the Q&A portion of this event.

    Frank X Walker is the first African American writer to be named Kentucky Poet Laureate. He has published eleven collections of poetry, including Masked Man, Black: Pandemic and Protest Poems and Turn Me Loose: The Unghosting of Medgar Evers, which was awarded the 2014 NAACP Image Award for Poetry and the Black Caucus American Library Association Honor Award for Poetry. Voted one of the most creative professors in the South, Walker coined the term “Affrilachia” and cofounded the Affrilachian Poets. He is the founding editor of pluck! The Journal of Affrilachian Arts and Culture and serves as professor of English and African American and Africana studies at the University of Kentucky in Lexington.

    Derrick Harriell is the Otillie Schillig Associate Professor of English and African American Studies at the University of Mississippi. His poem collections are Cotton (2010), Ropes (2013, winner of the 2014 Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters award in poetry), and Stripper in Wonderland (2017). His poems, stories, and essays have been published widely.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Thu
    18
    Feb
    2021
    12:00 am

    Many Crofties come into college knowing two things: they want to do international studies and they want to live in Washington DC after graduation. This panel will be made up of Croft alumni who are now living and working in DC. They will share their experiences on finding, applying, and working their way through all the challenges to get to DC.

  • Thu
    18
    Feb
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    All events will be held via Zoom. To get more information or to register, visit https://sarahisomcenter.org/events

    Shennette Garrett-Scott, associate professor of history and African American Studies, will discuss the life and impact of Mary Cordelia Montgomery Booze in our first Sarahtalk of the semester.

    About Mary Cordelia Montgomery Booze:

    Born Mary Montgomery in March 1878 to parents who had been enslaved when young, she grew up in the Mississippi Delta. Her father, Isaiah T. Montgomery (1847-1924), was a cotton producer politically allied with the famous Republican educator Booker T. Washington. In 1887, the Montgomerys moved to Bolivar County south of Clarksdale in the rich delta country of northwestern Mississippi. There Montgomery founded an all-black agricultural community, Mound Bayou, located along the Mississippi River. Mary was educated locally before going to New Orleans, Louisiana, where she studied for two years at the historically black Straight University. She returned to Mound Bayou and worked as a bookkeeper in the family business. She also taught at the teacher-training Mound Bayou Normal Institute.

    Despite state restrictions that effectively disenfranchised most blacks, Booze joined the Republican Party. Beginning in 1924, she served as a committeewoman from Mississippi to the Republican National Committee, the first African-American woman to hold that position.

  • Wed
    24
    Feb
    2021
    12:00 pm@ Online

    SouthTalks: “The Emmett Till Generation: Youth Activism, Radical Protest, and Social Change in Jim Crow Mississippi” @ Online

    Feb 24 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

    Daphne Chamberlain’s talk highlights the role of children as leaders and participants in the Mississippi civil rights movement between 1946 and 1965. This presentation also offers a new perspective on the origins of the civil rights struggle and gives credence to how instrumental young people were to engaging in radical protest and grassroots activism in Mississippi.

    Chamberlain completed her undergraduate studies at Tougaloo College in 2001 and received her M.A. and Ph.D. in history from the University of Mississippi. Before returning to Tougaloo as a faculty member, Chamberlain was the founding director of the COFO Civil Rights Education Center at Jackson State University. In 2013 Chamberlain returned to Tougaloo College, where she is an associate professor of history and the associate provost and vice president for academic affairs.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Wed
    24
    Feb
    2021
    5:00 pm@Online

    In addition to the many artists the Department of Art & Art History invites to campus through student organizations they also have an established visiting artist program called Art Talks. This program creates access to artists via webcam and in-person lectures, and it provides students access to keep pace with critical thought, contemporary artistic practice, and emerging technology used in cultural production today.

    February 24, 2021 at 5:00 pm

    Margaret Vendryes, Art Historian, Artist, and Curator | mrvendryes.com

    Margaret Rose Vendryes entered the faculty of York College and The Graduate Center in 2000. She is the author of Barthé, A Life in Sculpture (2008). Vendryes returned to York College, in 2013, as Distinguished Lecturer in Fine Arts and Director of the York College Fine Arts Gallery after a seven-year absence during which she established a successful studio practice. As a visual artist, Vendryes is best known for her painting series The African Diva Project which merges African masks with commercial images of popular black women soloists. She is currently Chair of the Department of Performing and Fine Arts.

    Zoom Meeting Information
    Register in advance for this meeting:
    https://olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIpcOCopzIuGtYAKPHbQp7w8c0Jkd8KQy2a
    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

  • Thu
    25
    Feb
    2021
    Sun
    28
    Feb
    2021
    SFA Zoom Room

    2021 SFA Writing Workshop

    Announcing the 2021 SFA Writing Workshop

    The Southern Foodways Alliance tells stories about American food culture. We commission great writing. And we foster emerging and mid-career writers whose work explores food and foodways. With those goals in mind, we are now taking applications for an SFA nonfiction writing workshop to be held via Zoom February 25-28, 2021. SFA director John T. Edge and managing editor Sara Camp Milam are your leaders. Together they bring nearly three decades of editorial experience and twenty books (written, cowritten, or edited) to the table.

    Applicants should be at work on a book or longform feature story at the time of application. It does not have to be under contract or placed for publication. The work must be nonfiction and closely tied to themes of food or foodways. Preference is given to applicants whose work is set in, or tied to, the American South. Applicants at work on a longform audio story are eligible for consideration.

    Wondering if this workshop is for you? Past workshop participants have included chefs working on their first cookbooks, journalists aiming to direct their attention to food and foodways, and academics who wish to present their scholarship to a general audience.

    Vivian Howard, chef, television host, and author of Deep Run Roots, is a graduate.

    “When I attended the SFA writer’s workshop I doubted I had the know-how to write anything other than a noteworthy email,” she told us. “But the collaborative experience of writing, reading and listening to other authors allowed me the opportunity to hear my voice in a way that validated it. The experience was a turning point that armed me with confidence, direction and community.”

    Workshop graduates have published essays and reportage in Gravy, the SFA’s quarterly journal. And they have written award-winning books that got better under SFA guidance. If you’re looking for guidance, great conversation, and time to step away from your day job and into the writing life, you’ll find it here.

    The workshop begins at 5 pm on Thursday, February 25, and ends at Noon on Sunday, February 28. It provides a mix of group discussion, one-on-one editorial consultation, and self-directed writing time. Tuition of $100 includes all instruction.

    HOW  TO APPLY:

    A complete application consists of 3 parts: cover letter, project description, and writing sample.

    Cover letter: No more than one page, telling us about yourself as a writer—previous publications, areas of interest, etc.

    Project description: No more than one page, describing your project. What is it about? Who is the intended audience? Where are you now, and where do you plan to be when you arrive for the workshop? What do you hope to gain from working with SFA editors?

    Writing sample: 5-10 pages in length, nonfiction, published or unpublished. The sample may consist of one longer piece or multiple shorter works. It does not have to be related to the project you wish to pursue for the workshop.

    Please submit your application via email to Melissa Booth Hall at melissa@southernfoodways.org. Subject line should read “[Your last name] – Writing Workshop Application.” Please attach your application components as Word documents or PDFs.

    There is no application fee. One scholarship is available. Please indicate in your cover letter if you wish to be considered for the scholarship. The scholarship covers workshop tuition.

    APPLICATIONS ARE DUE at 5 pm Central Time on Friday, January 15, 2021. Late applications will not be reviewed. Successful applicants will be notified of their acceptance by Monday, January 25, 2021.

  • Thu
    25
    Feb
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    02/25/2021 Prof. Jorge Gonzalez (University of Valencia) will present a seminar to the department

    4:00 pm, Zoom, https://chemistry.olemiss.edu/

  • Wed
    03
    Mar
    2021
    12:00 pm@ Online

    SouthTalks: “White Kids: Growing Up with Privilege in a Racially Divided America” @ Online

    Mar 3 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
    American children are living in a world of ongoing public debates about race, daily displays of racial violence, and for some, an increased awareness of inequality. Based on two years of ethnographic research with affluent white kids and their families, Margaret A. Hagerman’s talk examines how white kids learn about race, racism, inequality, and privilege in the contexts of their everyday lives. This talk explores how white racial socialization is a process that stretches beyond white parents’ explicit conversations with their white children and includes not only the choices parents make about neighborhoods, schools, peer groups, extracurricular activities, and media, but also the choices made by the kids themselves.

    Margaret A. Hagerman is an associate professor of sociology at Mississippi State University and is a faculty affiliate in the African American studies and gender studies programs there. She is the author of White Kids: Growing Up with Privilege in a Racially Divided America (2019), and she is a nationally recognized expert on white racial socialization. Her research can be found in publications such as the Journal of Marriage and Family, Sociology of Race and Ethnicity, and Ethnic and Racial Studies, among others. She has visited a number of schools and communities across the country to share her work with parents, teachers, neighborhood associations, school administrators, and young people.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Wed
    03
    Mar
    2021
    4:30 pmZoom

    The Department of Classics and The Archaeological Institute of America Present a Virtual Lecture

    ProfessorCarrie Atkins, The Department of Historical Studies, The University of Toronto, Mississauga

    “Shipwrecks and the Transport of Luxury in the Roman Mediterranean”

    https://utoronto.zoom.us/j/85949519411

    Wednesday, March 3rd at 4:30 PM

  • Wed
    03
    Mar
    2021
    5:00 pm@Online

    In addition to the many artists the Department of Art & Art History invites to campus through student organizations, they also have an established visiting artist program called Art Talks. This program creates access to artists via webcam and in-person lectures, and it provides students access to keep pace with critical thought, contemporary artistic practice, and emerging technology used in cultural production today.

    March 03, 2021 at 5:00 pm

    Ben Snell, Artist | bensnell.io

    Ben Snell is an artist who listens to and amplifies the inner dialogues of machines. Using contemporary techniques and traditional motifs, he navigates the space between creation and automation, suggesting a humanist approach to technology.

    Zoom Meeting Information
    Register in advance for this meeting:
    https://olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJcud-2trz4vE92bBQAclp9ZKEpulg7ee1A6
    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

  • Thu
    04
    Mar
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    All events will be held via Zoom. To get more information or to register, visit https://sarahisomcenter.org/events

    Join the Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies for a roundtable discussion with women chairs in the College of Liberal Arts as they discuss their own experiences and challenges. Those schedule to participate are:

    • Nancy Maria Balach - Music
    • Kirsten Dellinger - Sociology/College of Liberal Arts
    • Katie McKee - Center for the Study of Southern Culture
    • Molly Pasco-Pranger - Classics
    • Rebekah Smith - Psychology
    • Caroline Wigginton - English
    • Noell Wilson - History
    • Ethel Young-Scurlock - African American Studies
    • Jaime Harker - Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies (moderator)
  • Fri
    05
    Mar
    2021
    2:00 pmZoom

    Date: Friday, March 5, 2021, 2:00 – 2:50pm

    Speaker: Dr. Chris Muir
    Assistant professor, School of Life Sciences, University of Hawaii
    Seminar title: Global syntheses of stomatal evolution and local adaptationa

    Host: Dr. Peter Zee, assistant professor of biology, zee@olemiss.edu

    All biology seminars will be held via Zoom. Please contact host for further information.

  • Mon
    08
    Mar
    2021
    Fri
    12
    Mar
    2021
    Virtual

    https://oxfordconferenceforthebook.com/

    Founded by the Center and Square Books, the conference brings together fiction and nonfiction writers, journalists, artists, poets, publishers, teachers, students, and literacy advocates for three days of conversation in the literary town of Oxford, Mississippi.

    The 27th Oxford Conference for the Book will take place March 8 – March 12, 2021. DUE TO COVID-19, ALL EVENTS ARE VIRTUAL.

  • Mon
    08
    Mar
    2021
    4:00 pmVirtual

    Brian Foster, assistant professor of sociology and Southern Studies and the 2021 University of Mississippi Humanities Teacher of the Year, will speak on "I Don't Like the Blues: A Lesson on Listening."

    Register in advance for this webinar:

     

  • Mon
    08
    Mar
    2021
    6:30 pmZoom

    Mab Segrest is professor emeritus of gender and women’s studies at Connecticut College and the author of Administrations of Lunacy: Racism and the Haunting of American Psychiatry at the Milledgeville Asylum, Memoir of a Race Traitor, Born to Belonging: Writings on Spirit and Justice, and My Mama’s Dead Squirrel: Lesbian Essays on Southern Culture. A longtime activist in social justice movements and a past fellow at the National Humanities Center, she lives in Durham, North Carolina.

    The Lecture will take place on Monday, March 8th at 6:30 PM.  If you are interested in attending, please click here to register.

    The Lunacy Radio Hour hosted by Mab Segrest with special guests: Dr. Ralph H. Didlake, Dr. Jeni Bond, and Jay Watson will take place on Tuesday, March 9th at 5 PM.  If you are interested in attending, please click here to register.

    If you have any additional questions, please email engl@olemiss.edu.

    Mission Statement
    The Edith T. Baine Lecture Series for Scholars and Writers invites the best and brightest scholars and writers to our campus. The Baine lecturers and writers are chosen on the basis of energetic and engaged scholarship and creative work, innovative approaches, and dynamic presentation styles. The lectures showcase paradigm-shifting research and groundbreaking writing. The visiting scholars and writers are intended to expose undergraduates to the fullness of a life deeply engaged in literature while inspiring graduate students to pursue ambitious work.

    Edith T. Baine
    Mrs. Edith Turley Baine of El Dorado was born November 29, 1945 in Greenville, Mississippi, the daughter of Edith Waits Turley and George Turley. She graduated from Leland High School and the University of Mississippi, where she received B.A.E. and M.A.E. degrees. Mrs. Baine was a member of the First Presbyterian Church of El Dorado, El Dorado Service League, Phi Mu Sorority and Delta Theta Phi Law Fraternity International. She was a former member of the Board of Directors of the Union County Humane Society. She was an El Dorado Jaycettes and later became an El Dorado Jaycee. She was a tree farmer and retired English teacher who taught in Mississippi and at El Dorado High School. On April 13, 2012, Mrs. Baine passed away at Baptist Health Medical Center in Little Rock. Her generous gift to the English Department at the University of Mississippi supports this lecture series and promotes academic and creative exchange.

  • Tue
    09
    Mar
    2021
    5:00 pmZoom

    Mab Segrest is professor emeritus of gender and women’s studies at Connecticut College and the author of Administrations of Lunacy: Racism and the Haunting of American Psychiatry at the Milledgeville Asylum, Memoir of a Race Traitor, Born to Belonging: Writings on Spirit and Justice, and My Mama’s Dead Squirrel: Lesbian Essays on Southern Culture. A longtime activist in social justice movements and a past fellow at the National Humanities Center, she lives in Durham, North Carolina.

    The Lecture will take place on Monday, March 8th at 6:30 PM.  If you are interested in attending, please click here to register.

    The Lunacy Radio Hour hosted by Mab Segrest with special guests: Dr. Ralph H. Didlake, Dr. Jeni Bond, and Jay Watson will take place on Tuesday, March 9th at 5 PM.  If you are interested in attending, please click here to register.

    If you have any additional questions, please email engl@olemiss.edu.

    Mission Statement
    The Edith T. Baine Lecture Series for Scholars and Writers invites the best and brightest scholars and writers to our campus. The Baine lecturers and writers are chosen on the basis of energetic and engaged scholarship and creative work, innovative approaches, and dynamic presentation styles. The lectures showcase paradigm-shifting research and groundbreaking writing. The visiting scholars and writers are intended to expose undergraduates to the fullness of a life deeply engaged in literature while inspiring graduate students to pursue ambitious work.

    Edith T. Baine
    Mrs. Edith Turley Baine of El Dorado was born November 29, 1945 in Greenville, Mississippi, the daughter of Edith Waits Turley and George Turley. She graduated from Leland High School and the University of Mississippi, where she received B.A.E. and M.A.E. degrees. Mrs. Baine was a member of the First Presbyterian Church of El Dorado, El Dorado Service League, Phi Mu Sorority and Delta Theta Phi Law Fraternity International. She was a former member of the Board of Directors of the Union County Humane Society. She was an El Dorado Jaycettes and later became an El Dorado Jaycee. She was a tree farmer and retired English teacher who taught in Mississippi and at El Dorado High School. On April 13, 2012, Mrs. Baine passed away at Baptist Health Medical Center in Little Rock. Her generous gift to the English Department at the University of Mississippi supports this lecture series and promotes academic and creative exchange.

  • Thu
    11
    Mar
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    03/11/2021 Prof. Daniel Crawford (Virginia Tech) will present a seminar to the department

    4:00 pm, Zoom, https://chemistry.olemiss.edu/

  • Sat
    13
    Mar
    2021
    Sun
    14
    Mar
    2021
    @Online

    2021 Spring Symposium: Environments and Transformation

    Tickets go on sale Tuesday, January 19 at 10 a.m. CT.

    The Southern Foodways Alliance is delighted to announce Jon-Sesrie Goff as the guest curator of the 2021 Spring Symposium.  As a multidisciplinary artist whose work crosses different mediums and platforms, Goff is renowned for his penchant to seamlessly integrate social engagement, film, moving image, performance, photography and installation. His practice explores the intersection of race, power, identity, gender and the environment by unearthing the visceral representational value and authenticity behind the images propelled across varying diasporas.

    ***

    Join SFA for the 2021 Spring Symposium, scheduled March 13-14, 2021, when we focus on environments and transformation through the medium of film. Filmmakers ask questions that connect Birmingham’s Greek community and Choctaw Native peoples.  Expect an archival surrealist dive into the lives of the women who powered the Underground railroad.  Learn about Milwaukee as a terminus for the Great Migration.  Those questions begin in the South and span the world.

    Featuring filmmakers Colleen Thurston, Jessica Chriesman, Paavo Hanninen, Devon “Vonnie Quest” Smith, and Madeleine Hunt-Ehrlich, among others, the symposium will be delivered to your smart TV or laptop via the Eventive platform. Live Q&A sessions will offer opportunities to connect with presenters.

    Tickets, priced at $75 each, go on sale January 19, 2021 at 10 a.m. CT.

  • Mon
    15
    Mar
    2021
    Fri
    26
    Mar
    2021
    8:00AM-5:00PMGallery 130 Meek Hall

    Current faculty members in the Department of Art & Art History will have works in Gallery 130! Please practice safe, social distancing.

  • Tue
    16
    Mar
    2021
    12:00 amZoom

    Oxford Science Cafe Quiz Bowl

    Host: Dr. Gavin Davies, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy

    Join us for a night of fun and trivia! Match wits with other science enthusiasts! Win prizes!

    March 16, 2021, 6:00pm - 7:00pm
    Via Zoom

     

  • Wed
    17
    Mar
    2021
    9:00 amZoom

    Philosophy Forum: Professor Maria Rosa Antognazza and The Distinction in Kind between Knowledge and Belief.

    For details, visit:

    https://philosophy.olemiss.edu/33302-2/

     

  • Wed
    17
    Mar
    2021
    12:00 pm@ Online

    SouthTalks: “Indigenous Cultures and Histories of the Southeast” @ Online

    Mar 17 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
    The Original Peoples of the Southeast differed culturally, politically, and linguistically from other tribes across North America. The Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee, and Seminole Nations were forcibly removed from their traditional homelands and relocated to Oklahoma. In her talk, Dwanna L. McKay will examine some of the unique cultural practices and diverse histories of Indigenous Nations originally of the southeastern woodlands from precontact to current day.

    Dwanna L. McKay is a citizen of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation and an assistant professor in the race, ethnicity, and migration studies program at Colorado College. McKay holds a PhD in sociology, a graduate certificate in Indigenous studies, an MS in sociology, an MBA in management science, and a BA in political science. Raised culturally within the boundaries of her tribal nation in Oklahoma, McKay centers her teaching, research, service, and activism on an overall commitment to social justice. Her research focuses on social inequality and Indigenous identity, and has been published in numerous scholarly journals, including Sociological Compass, Sociology of Race and Ethnicity, American Indian Quarterly, American Indian Culture and Research Journal, and the European Sociological Review. She has also authored multiple book chapters, poems, essays, and opinion editorials. McKay currently serves on the national advisory committee for the Native American Student Advocacy Institute and previously held an appointment as Secretary of Education for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Thu
    18
    Mar
    2021
    Fri
    19
    Mar
    2021
    Virtual

    “Identity Across the Curriculum,” an interdisciplinary virtual conference that explores how identity informs, complicates, inspires, and challenges research, teaching and learning at the University of Mississippi, will be held March 18-19, 2021. Visit https://sarahisomcenter.org/iac for more information.

     

  • Thu
    18
    Mar
    2021
    7:30 pmYouTube Premiere

    The University of Mississippi Department of Music Black History Month Concert premieres on YouTube on March 18th at 7:30 pm. Get the concert program here.

    Featuring New Orleans Jazz legend, clarinetist Doreen Ketchens, the Ole Miss African Drum and Dance Ensemble, and the Mississippians Jazz Ensemble.

  • Fri
    19
    Mar
    2021
    2:00 pmZoom

    Date: Friday, March 19, 2021, 2:00 – 2:50pm

    Speaker: Dr. Lynn Siefferman
    Associate professor,  Biology Department, Appalachian State University
    Seminar title: TBD

    Host: Dr. Susan Balenger, assistant professor of biology, balenger@olemiss.edu

    All biology seminars will be held via Zoom. Please contact host for further information.

  • Mon
    22
    Mar
    2021
    7:00 pm

    Croft Virtual Speaker: Dr. Judith Shapiro

    “As China Goes, So Goes the Planet”

    Monday, March 22
    7:00 pm.-8:00 p.m.

    What does it mean for the rest of us when "China Goes Green"?  Is "ecological civilization" everything that it promises?  In this talk, Prof. Judith Shapiro will explore a new age of coercive environmentalism in China and its implications for how a rising superpower wields its economic and political might overseas.

    Save the date for this Virtual Speaker webinar!

  • Mon
    22
    Mar
    2021
    7:30 pmFord Center for the Performing Arts

    The University of Mississippi Department of Music presents the LOU Symphony Orchestra, Dr. Selim Giray, Director

    March 22nd, in a live-only performance at the Ford Center .

    The LOU Symphony Orchestra performs live with 2020 Concerto Competition winners Angelina Meeks and Will Hamilton on Monday, March 22nd at 7:30 at the Ford Center. The program includes a clarinet concerto by Finzi, and "Creation of the World" by Milhaud.
    Tickets are $10 ($5 if you have a UM ID) and can be reserved through the UM Box Office at 915-7411 or umbo@olemiss.edu. The audience will be limited due to distancing requirements, so get your ticket now.
  • Tue
    23
    Mar
    2021
    12:00 amZoom

    Are you interested in learning about graduate school or internships in Museum Studies?

    Join a virtual question & answer session on March 23rd at 6:00PM.

    RSVP to kfuqua@olemiss.edu for Zoom link.

    Museum Studies 2021 Q&A

  • Tue
    23
    Mar
    2021
    8:00 pmYouTube

    University of Mississippi Department of Music Virtual Concert

    Sonic Explorations
    March 23
    8:00 pm
    Featuring work composed by Stephanie Ann Boyd for piano, piano and flute, and piano and cello, performed by UM Music faculty members Adrienne Park, Christine Kralik, and Nave Graham.
  • Thu
    25
    Mar
    2021
    5:30 pmZoom

    The Mind-Body Connection and the Secret Life of your Immune System

    Dr. Staci Bilbo, Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University

    Activation of the immune system via illness, poor nutrition, or a stressful environment in youth can alter early brain development and impact adult mood, physical health, and ability to think and can influence health outcomes like obesity and drug use. Understanding how the immune system interacts with the body and brain to produce these results guides our ability to lessen their harm. Social factors like poverty, pollution, and addiction contribute to activation of the immune system. Thus, it is also important to work with communities to dampen the devastating influence of these social factors on the growing brain. Dr. Bilbo will talk about research in an animal model examining the impact of combined environmental stressors during pregnancy on offspring mental health outcomes, and how these impacts may be mitigated by targeting the immune system.

    Special time and place! Thursday, March 25, 2021, 5:30pm - 6:30pm
    Via Zoom

  • Fri
    26
    Mar
    2021
    2:00 pmZoom

    Date: Friday, March 26, 2021, 2:00 – 2:50pm

    Speaker: Dr. Staci Bilbo
    Professor,  Systems and Integrative Neuroscience Group, Duke University
    Seminar title: TBD

    Host: Dr. Lainy Day, associate professor of biology and neuroscience minor director, lainyday@olemiss.edu – Neuroscience Symposium

    All biology seminars will be held via Zoom. Please contact host for further information.

  • Tue
    30
    Mar
    2021
    12:00 pmZoom

    Lecture Title: Medical Migration and the NHS's Permanent Recruitment Crisis

    Speaker: Julian M. Simpson

    When: Tuesday, March 30, at noon CST via Zoom.

    Registration: To register for the virtual lecture, simply click on the following link: olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/regist

    Lecture Abstract: Using oral history interviews and archival research I will explore the complex nature of the relationship between the UK’s National Health Service and the medical migrants who have played an essential role in staffing it since its inception in 1948. While lip service has been paid to their numerical importance, there has been less focus on the specific nature of the roles they have performed in the British healthcare system and what this reveals about the culture of medicine and the structure of the NHS. Medical migrants need to be understood as providing ‘special’ labour rather than simply ‘additional’ labour. In the first four decades of the NHS, migrant doctors were disproportionately represented in the provision of care for the least affluent and most vulnerable sections of society. I would argue that this is the core function of the NHS, hence that they were its architects. Their presence in fields such as psychiatry or areas of medicine such as inner-city general practice was not simply the product of a shortage of doctors in absolute terms. It was about the low-status of these forms of work within the British medical profession, and the emigration of their UK colleagues who chose to shun the opportunities that migrants used to build careers. Similar patterns in the deployment of medics can be observed in other westernised medical systems and I will conclude by highlighting the different ways in which this history is relevant to our understanding of global public health. 

    Speaker biography: Julian M. Simpson is an independent writer, researcher, and translator. He has worked in a number of capacities for various organisations, including the BBC World Service, the Scottish Refugee Council, the l’Afrique à Newcastle Festival and the University of Manchester. He is the author of Migrant architects of the NHS: South Asian doctors and the reinvention of British general practice (1940s-1980s) (Manchester University Press, 2018) and co-editor of History, Historians and the Immigration Debate: Going Back to Where We Came From (Palgrave, 2019).

     

  • Wed
    31
    Mar
    2021
    12:00 pmZoom

    SouthTalks: I Don’t Like the Blues: Race, Place, and the Backbeat of Black Life with B. Brian Foster
    In the last six years, B. Brian Foster has talked with hundreds of Black Mississippians about race, the blues, politics, memory, community, and more. In this talk, he shares with us some of what they’ve shared with him, and he considers what it all might mean both now and for the future. Some of that work is included in his new book, I Don’t Like the Blues: Race, Place, and the Backbeat of Black Life, in which he considers the value of non-affirming sensibilities like pessimism, frustration, and exhaustion for how we think about Black identity and lived experience.

    B. Brian Foster is a writer and storyteller from Mississippi. He earned his PhD in sociology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and currently works as assistant professor of sociology and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi. Foster also serves as coeditor of the journal Sociology of Race and Ethnicity and is director of the Mississippi Hill Country Oral History Collective.

    Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Southern Culture

    Noon

    https://olemiss.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_nTvRpDCHRZuQLjnibBGEEA

  • Thu
    01
    Apr
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    All events will be held via Zoom. To get more information or to register, visit https://sarahisomcenter.org/events

    Join Sarah Heying, Ph.D. Candidate in English, as she discusses the importance of confronting the entanglement of shame and intimacy as a queer research practice, using Dorothy Allison’s papers as a case study.

  • Wed
    07
    Apr
    2021
    5:00 pm@Online

    In addition to the many artists the Department of Art & Art History invites to campus through student organizations, they also have an established visiting artist program called Art Talks. This program creates access to artists via webcam and in-person lectures, and it provides students access to keep pace with critical thought, contemporary artistic practice, and emerging technology used in cultural production today.

    April 07, 2021 at 5:00 pm

    Karen Barber, Art Historian

    Dr. Karen Barber received her Ph.D. at the Graduate Center, City University of New York, with a dissertation entitled “Writing with Light: Cameraless Photography and Its Narrative in the 1920s.” She specializes in the history of photography and 20th-century art. Her work has been published in Exposure and Studies in Photography. With a background in museums, she has worked in photography collections at SFMOMA, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, and the California Museum of Photography. She is currently working on a manuscript on cameraless photography and its publications in the 1920s.

    Zoom Meeting Information
    Register in advance for this meeting:
    https://olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYld-mvrj0vG9cIlLwkKpzj1Pcje8gixikb
    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

  • Wed
    07
    Apr
    2021
    7:00 pmZoom
    The Forty-Eighth James Edwin Savage Lecture in the Renaissance: “Ghosts, Devils, and the Haunting of History — or the Minister Meets his Match” by Kathryn A. Edwards, professor of history at the University of South Carolina
    April 7, 2021 @ 7 p.m. via Zoom.
  • Fri
    09
    Apr
    2021
    11:00 amYouTube Livestream

    Are you missing the community that iron pours bring? Is molten metal something that you find interesting or exciting? This Spring, the UM Sculpture Society is proud to bring the iron pour to you! Livestream 4/9 @ 11:00 AM CST via Youtube:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Po5b5FtMyzA

     

  • Mon
    12
    Apr
    2021
  • Wed
    14
    Apr
    2021
    12:00 pm@Online

    SouthTalks: “Still Worth Fighting For” @ Online

    Apr 14 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
    Black students have struggled to reimagine the university. That struggle is one still worth fighting for. In the 1980s, when the rightward momentum shook the world to its core, Black student movements offered an alternative vision. Joshua M. Myers’s presentation will look to Howard students during that era as a model for what we still might do with the university.

    Myers’s book, We Are Worth Fighting For, is the first history of the 1989 Howard University protest. The three-day occupation of the university’s administration building was a continuation of the student movements of the sixties and a unique challenge to the politics of the eighties. Upset at the university’s appointment of the Republican strategist Lee Atwater to the Board of Trustees, students forced the issue by shutting down the operations of the university. The protest, inspired in part by the emergence of “conscious” hip-hop, helped to build support for the idea of student governance and drew upon a resurgent Black Nationalist ethos.

    At the center of this story is a student organization known as Black Nia F.O.R.C.E. (Freedom Organization for Racial and Cultural Enlightenment). Cofounded by Ras Baraka, the group was at the forefront of organizing the student mobilization at Howard during the spring of 1989 and thereafter. We Are Worth Fighting For explores how Black student activists—young men and women— helped shape and resist the rightward shift and neoliberal foundations of American politics. This history adds to the literature on Black campus activism, Black Power studies, and the emerging histories of African American life in the 1980s.

    Joshua M. Myers is an associate professor of Africana studies in the Department of Afro-American Studies at Howard University. He is the author of We Are Worth Fighting For: A History of the Howard University Student Protest of 1989 (2019) and the editor of A Gathering Together: Literary Journal.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Wed
    21
    Apr
    2021
    12:00 amZoom

    The last Oxford Science Café of the semester! We will have Dr. Sabetta Matsumoto, Assistant Professor in the School of Physics at the Georgia Institute of Technology, give us a presentation titled "Knotty Knits and Evening of Math and Crafts."

     

    Dr. Matsumoto will be discussing creative crafts and math research. What can physics learn from crochet? How does a simple stitch change the stretch of a scarf, and how are modern materials and manufacturing learning from their wooly ancestors? Join Dr. Matsumoto for a talk about curvature using pattern making, symmetries using quilt squares and flags, hyperbolic space using quilting at crochet, and knot theory and coding using knits.

    For your reading pleasure, check out this linked NYTimes article on her research!

     

    When: Tuesday, April 20 2021, 6:00pm - 7:00pm CT.

    Where: Zoom! Meeting ID: 975 6831 5885 or click on the following link: https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/97568315885

    Cost: Free!

    If you are unable to attend, you can always watch the recordings on our website!

     

    Oxford Science Café: Monthly conversations about the science we know and 

    the science we don't know. Everyone is invited, and children are welcome! 

    Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

  • Wed
    21
    Apr
    2021
    2:00PM-5:00PMBryant Hall

    Invitation: Join us to celebrate spring and Rome's birthday with readings from Greek and Latin literature and safely served snacks!

    Come celebrate the Parilia, Rome's birthday and a spring shepherd's festival, on Wednesday, April 21. Drop in anytime between 2 and 5 to read from your favorite Greek or Roman author, or just to listen and visit!

    We'll be outside for safety, but will still maintain some distance, and masks are expected unless actively eating or reading at the microphone.

    For assistance related to a disability, contact Molly Pasco-Pranger: mpranger@olemiss.edu | 6629157097

    Sponsored by: Eta Sigma Phi, Classics

  • Fri
    23
    Apr
    2021
    7:30 pmFacebook

    University of Mississippi Department of Music Virtual Concert

    UM Wind Ensemble
    April 23
    7:30 pm
    Live streamed from Ford Center
    The UM Wind Ensemble is celebrated for good reason: the full, rich sound of woodwinds, brass, and percussion lends itself to stirring music. Experience it for yourself on April 23 -- live at the Ford Center or via livestream on the UM Band Facebook page.
  • Sun
    25
    Apr
    2021
    3:00 pmYouTube Premiere

    University of Mississippi Department of Music Virtual Concert

    Faculty Recital Featuring
    Dr. Adam Estes and Dr. Nave Graham
    April 25
    3:00 pm
    Estes (saxophone, bassoon) and Graham (flute) team up for a recital that explores new music and established classics for wind instruments.
  • Fri
    30
    Apr
    2021
    7:30 pmYouTube Premiere

    University of Mississippi Department of Music Virtual Concert

    UM Opera Theatre
    April 30
    7:30 pm
    Join the UM Opera Theatre for a program of scenes from opera and music theatre that feature your favorite fairy-tale tough girl, Cinderella.
  • Mon
    17
    May
    2021
    Sat
    21
    Aug
    2021
    Online

    ONLINE GALLERY

    The Department of Art & Art History will announce award winners later this summer.

    This year's Juror is Paul David Seeman. Paul is a native Texan, born in Houston, raised in Austin, and now living and working in San Antonio, Texas. Paul earned his MFA in Sculpture at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi and a BFA in studio art from Texas State University in San Marcos. His sculptures and installations are designed with passion and love. They are shaped by fire, muscle, blood, and sweat. Paul believes that medium is dictated by meaning, passion, form, and function rather than obligation. Learning to work with new materials is part of the artist's experience to Paul. His recent works are composed of cast metal, ceramics, wood, string, plastic, and of course, dancing metal. To Paul, sculpture is an engaging way to bring awareness, emotion, color, and beauty into a place.

  • Sat
    12
    Jun
    2021
    4:00 pmThe Grove

    The Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies is bringing the annual celebration of the LGBTQ community to the center of campus – the Grove.

    “Out in the Grove: A Pride Celebration” will take place June 12, starting at 4 p.m.

    For a schedule of Out in the Grove events and more information on Oxford Pride, visit OxfordPride.rocks.

  • Sun
    13
    Jun
    2021
    6:00 pmGrove Stage

    There will be four Summer Sunset Series concerts in June, with the Center for the Study of Southern Culture sponsoring the Sunday, June 13 event at 6 p.m. with James “Super Chikan” Johnson, a blues musician based in Clarksdale, Mississippi.

    Other concerts are:

    June 6 – The Soul Tones sponsored by the Yoknapatawpha Arts Council

    June 13 – James “Super Chikan” Johnson sponsored by the Center for the Study of Southern Culture

    June 20 – Blackwater Trio sponsored by the University of Mississippi Museum

    June 27 – Thacker Mountain Radio sponsored by the Ford Center for the Performing Arts and the Mississippi Arts Commission

     

  • Sun
    18
    Jul
    2021
    Wed
    21
    Jul
    2021
    Remote

    Faulkner, Welty, Wright: A Mississippi Confluence

    Due to continuing concerns related to the COVID pandemic, the 2021 Faulkner & Yoknapatawpha conference will be held remotely.

    Please visit this site for full conference details, including the program schedule and online registration instructions.

    http://www.outreach.olemiss.edu/events/faulkner/

  • Sun
    15
    Aug
    2021
    8:00PM-10:00PMKennon Observatory

    The Department of Physics and Astronomy offers astronomy open houses centered around viewings with telescopes. View the Moon, the planets, as well as double stars, depending on what is visible in the night sky during each scheduled open house.

    The current schedule is:

    • August         15   8:00 -   10:00 PM

    All these events are weather permitting. Admission is free.
    Children are welcome!

  • Mon
    30
    Aug
    2021
    Fri
    17
    Sep
    2021
    Gallery 130 Meek Hall

    Gallery 130, Meek Hall

    Closing Reception, September 16, 4:40–6:00 PM

  • Fri
    03
    Sep
    2021
    7:30 pmNutt Auditorium

    A saxophone recital with pianist Stacy Rodgers.

    Free admission.

  • Tue
    07
    Sep
    2021
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Martin Frank
    Department of Physics
    University of South Alabama

    First Results from NOνA's Magnetic Monopole Search

    The existence of the magnetic monopole has eluded physicists for centuries. The NOνA far detector (FD), used for neutrino oscillation searches, also has the ability to identify slowly moving magnetic monopoles (v < c /100). With a surface area of 4,100 m2 and a location near the earth's surface, the 14 kt FD provides us with the unique opportunity to be sensitive to potential low-mass monopoles unable to penetrate underground experiments. We have designed a novel data-driven triggering scheme that continuously searches the FD's live data for monopole-like patterns. At the offline level, the largest challenge in reconstructing monopoles is to reduce the 148,000 Hz speed-of-light cosmic ray background. In this talk, I will present the first results of the NOνA monopole search for slow monopoles.

     

    Join Zoom Meeting

    https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/91928227187

    Meeting ID: 919 282 27187

  • Wed
    08
    Sep
    2021
    12:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    Roy DeBerry discusses 'Voices from the Mississippi Hill Country: The Benton County Civil Rights Movement'

    Voices from the Mississippi Hill Country is a collection of interviews with residents of Benton County, Mississippi—an area with a long and fascinating civil rights history. The product of more than twenty-five years of work by the Hill Country Project, the book examines a revolutionary period in American history through the voices of farmers, teachers, sharecroppers, and students. No other rural farming county in the American South has yet been afforded such a deep dive into its civil rights experiences and their legacies. These accumulated stories truly capture life before, during, and after the movement.

    In this SouthTalk, coauthor of Voices from the Mississippi Hill Country Roy DeBerry will discuss the region’s history and the everyday struggles of African American residents of Benton County, who had been organizing since the 1930s.

    Roy DeBerry is executive director of the Hill Country Project. He recently retired as vice president for economic development and local governmental affairs at Jackson State University, where he also served as executive vice president and vice president of external relations.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the ongoing health crisis, many events will be virtual, free, and made accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for information about all Center events.

    Register to receive the Zoom link at https://olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMlcOivrjMuH9JR7pPlDJSu-xLHjkgaHkur 

  • Thu
    09
    Sep
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    The 90s are back, or at least we can pretend for an hour while indulging our nostalgic desire on September 9 from 4-5 pm when Dr. Cookie Woolner presents the first SarahTalk for the Fall ‘21 lineup, “‘Where the Girls Are’: Riot Grrl, Feminism, and Queer 1990s Culture.”

    Woolner, an assistant professor in the History department at the University of Memphis, is a cultural historian who focuses on race, gender, and sexuality. Her recent scholarship includes a chapter in Historicizing Fat in Anglo-American Culture and a manuscript entitled, “‘The Famous Lady Lovers:’ African-American Women and Same-Sex Desire Before Stonewall,” which is the first in-depth examination of black women who loved women in the nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries in the U.S.

    She adds that “unlike my usual historical work, this talk will be mostly based on my knowledge and experience from the time period. This will also hopefully be part of a new upcoming research project on the history of “sex-positive feminism” in the U.S.”

    When asked about the current generation’s obsession with 90s culture, Woolner says, “It seems like 90s nostalgia has been going on for quite a while; it’s been almost a decade since an interest in riot grrrl resurged, with the publication of books like Girls to the Front: The True Story of the Riot Grrrl Revolution (2012)  by Sara Marcus and the Riot Grrrl Collection (2013) zine book. Around that time the Russian band Pussy Riot was also active, who many saw as influenced by riot grrrl as well. And today with films like Moxie, riot grrrl bands are being reintroduced to young people, even though the originators are old enough to be their moms today, and some are, which was the plot of that recent Netflix film based on a novel.”

    The riot grrrl movement was more than a girl-focused punk music scene. It also heavily focused on cultural production - creating the art, music, and self-publications, like zines, in addition to holding local meetings and grassroots organizing with an emphasis on feminist issues.

    “Riot grrrl in the 1990s was primarily an analog subculture, although the internet was just beginning to come into use in the early 1990s when it began. It would not have existed without copy machines and the Kinko’s copy chain store, 8-track recorders, typewriters, word processors, wite-out, glue sticks, and the US postal system. These were the technologies that helped us create our pre-internet networks – the homemade magazines called fanzines that we poured our hearts out in and traded in the mail or sold for a dollar and stamps,” Woolner says.

    Wolner admits to being a “teenaged, fanzine-making queer riot grrrl in the 1990s myself. When asked about how the different technologies affected the movement, she said, “We also relied on personal ads and pen pal ads in music zines and for queer women, personal ads in magazines like On Our Backs, which today’s Lex dating app is modeled after. Chainsaw Records, a queer indie record label, had an online message board that was very popular with queer women into punk in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Print culture and the early internet were both important ways queer women found each other in an era when lesbian bars were still prevalent, so in retrospect, we had a lot of options.”

    The outsider status of the riot grrrl movement in a male-dominated punk scene also gave queer folx a space to express themselves that wasn’t available in the largely hetero- and bro-centric alternative music scene that dominated the 90s. While the Riot Grrl movement was a powerful influence on white women and queer folx, for some critics, though, it seemed there was not a lot of emphasis on issues that effected women of color. Woolner disputes that by reminding us that “punk scholar Mimi Thi Nguyen, [writes] about how the dominant narrative of riot grrrl highlights white women by focusing on Washington DC and Olympia, WA, where the movement first began. But there were also many women of color involved in the West and Southwest branches of riot grrrl, as local chapters opened all over the country. Bands like Emily’s Sassy Lime and zines like Mimi Nguyen’s Aim Your Dick and Slant are just a few examples of the important work by riot grrrls of color that have been left out of the simplified histories of the movement that focus on the bigger bands only.”

    Learn more about the Riot Grrl movement and its place in feminist history and in the production of queer culture by attending Dr. Woolner’s talk on September 9, at 4pm.

    Register for Zoom below: 

    https://olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMtf-CvqDIjE9KOePbt2EE5EOpatqJXFfZT

  • Fri
    10
    Sep
    2021
    5:00PM-6:00PMTrustmark Building 106 Courthouse Square, Oxford, MS

    Upper-Level of Trustmark Building on the Square. Free parking in the parking garage and parking lot. Enter through the door on the left of main entrance, go up the stairs to the venue.

    Featuring Poetry by Jacob Montalvo-Santiago

    Fiction by Vinh Hoang

    Moderated by Michael Pontacoloni

    BYOB

    Social Hour at the Blind Pig after!

    We kindly ask that if you are unvaccinated and choose to attend, that you remain masked and social distance from others.

  • Fri
    10
    Sep
    2021
    7:30PM-8:30PMOld Armory Pavillion

     

    The Center for the Study of Southern Culture and Yoknapatawpha Arts Council partner for the premiere of Mississippi Creates, an event that pairs musical performance with short documentary films, providing a glimpse into the creative life and environments of two local musicians: Tyler Keith and Schaefer Llana. This pair of films is part of a larger series that highlights artists and performers who have been influenced or inspired by the culture and sounds of Mississippi. The screening includes a live musical performance by Schaefer Llana and will be followed by a brief Q&A with the musician and film directors Annemarie Anderson and Kelly Spivey.

    Annemarie Anderson is the oral historian for the Southern Foodways Alliance. She manages and conducts oral history work throughout the South. At age 10 Schaefer Llana moved from St. Louis, Missouri, to Batesville, Mississippi, where she learned to play piano and guitar. Kelly Spivey is a documentarian living and working in Memphis, Tennessee. She holds a BFA in photography from SCAD, and both an MA in Southern Studies and an MFA in Documentary Expression from the University of Mississippi.

    Mississippi Creates is made possible by Cathead, the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, and the Mississippi Humanities Council.

    This event is free to the public and open to all ages. Bring your own chairs and refreshments. Doors at 7:30 p.m., show starts at 8 p.m.

  • Mon
    13
    Sep
    2021
    1:00 pmNutt Auditorium

    Host Nancy Maria Balach interviews musicians featured in the September 14th Voices of Mississippi Concert.

    Free admission.

  • Tue
    14
    Sep
    2021
    7:30 pmGertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts

    Concert highlighting the range of music and people from our great state.

    Tickets available here and at the UM Box Office (915-7411).

  • Wed
    15
    Sep
    2021
    1:00 pmNutt Auditorium

    Musicians featured in the Voices of Mississippi Concert work with UM Music students.

    Free admission.

  • Wed
    15
    Sep
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    IDEAS Forum: Inclusion, Diversity Equity - Advancing through Scholarship

    Speaker Lynn Woo

    Senior Research Associate, Center for Population Studies and the State Data Center of Mississippi Coordinator, Society and Health Minor

    A common perception of Mississippi, especially the Mississippi Delta, is of a place lacking in racial and ethnic diversity and culture. However, when one looks more deeply, there are populations of diverse people who have carved out spaces for themselves within this southern landscape. This talk will focus on the Mississippi Delta Chinese and how their story is woven into the fabric of Mississippi.

    The IDEAS Forum features work that highlights how inclusion, diversity, and equity are advancing through scholarship in the College. We dedicate the opening talk of the 2021–22 series to the efforts, begun last Spring in the wake of the tragic shootings of members of the AAPI community in Atlanta, to increase knowledge about the vast diversity of experiences within the Asian, Asian American, and Pacific Islander community with the express purpose of combating hate and inequity.

    Register in advance for this meeting:
    https://libarts.olemiss.edu/bamboo-and-cotton-the-mississippi-chinese/
    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

  • Thu
    16
    Sep
    2021
    7:30 pmNutt Auditorium

    Bassoonist Peter Kolkay, of Vanderbilt University, in recital.

    Free admission.

  • Thu
    16
    Sep
    2021
    4:30–6:00 PMGallery 130 Meek Hall

    August 30 – September 17
    Graduate Students' Art Exhibition Closing Reception
    Closing Reception: Thursday, September 16, 4:30–6:00 PM

  • Fri
    17
    Sep
    2021
    1:00 pmNutt Auditorium

    Accomplished bassoonist works with UM students in a master class setting. Public is welcome to observe this interesting process.

    Free admission.

  • Sun
    19
    Sep
    2021
    4:00 pmGertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts

    Featuring Renée Fleming in a conversation about music and the brain.

    Free admission. 

  • Mon
    20
    Sep
    2021
    7:30 pmGertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts

    Concert featuring the legendary performer.

    Tickets available here and at the UM Box Office (915-7411).

     

  • Tue
    21
    Sep
    2021
    Thu
    23
    Sep
    2021
    Bryant Hall, Gallery and Room 209

    With guest speaker Dr. Roland Betancourt, University of California-Irvine

    AGENDA:
    Tuesday, Sept. 21
    7:00 p.m. – Dr. Betancourt Dinner with Faculty

    Wednesday, Sept. 22
    Noon
    Bryant Hall Gallery
    Lunch Reception with students

    5:30 p.m.
    Lecture – Bryant Room 209
    Topic: “Thinking Through Medieval Categories of Gender, Sexuality, and Race”,

    Thursday, Sept. 23
    Dr. Betancourt – a.m. class visit

    Noon
    Bryant Hall Gallery
    Lunch Reception with students

    For more information regarding Religion Forum Series events, contact eastland@olemiss.edu or 662-915-7020.

  • Tue
    21
    Sep
    2021
    6:00 pmvia Zoom (connection details will follow)

    Dr. Lainy Day
    Department of Biology
    University of Mississippi

    The Sexiest Dancers are Made of the Right Stuff

    An amazing family of birds living in Central and South America, the manakins, are known for acrobatic courtship displays. Males of many manakin species attract females with elaborate dances. High-speed cameras have been used to identify the specific mechanism by which unique body-created sounds (sonations) are made and how hormones, bones, muscles, and brains support such intense dance routines. However, not all species’ displays appear to have as many dance steps or acrobatic elements. So, working with my team and with collaborators’ teams, I set out to record the dances of over a dozen diverse manakin species so we could then ask, what is the “right stuff” required to engineer specific types of athletic dancers. What type of brain and brawn is required for a pirouette compared to a moon-walk? And if displays are happening faster than the eye can see, how do we even know if we have missed something? We don’t. Allow me to reveal to you the hidden biomechanical diversity of manakin displays and throw in a bit of neuroendocrine physiology, muscular adaptations, and evolution that will eventually allow us to reverse engineer the ultimate dancer with the “right stuff."

  • Tue
    21
    Sep
    2021
    11:00 pmGertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts

    Renée Fleming works with UM Voice students in a masterclass setting.

    Free admission, open to an audience.

  • Wed
    22
    Sep
    2021
    5:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    Presenting on the work of African-American artist Fred Wilson.
    https://www.mcad.edu/faculty/anna-chisholm

    Register in advance for this meeting:
    https://olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJUvd–uqT8sHN3RqZdY_j1c0Ivt9TmosOO_
    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

  • Fri
    24
    Sep
    2021
    2:30 pmConner Hall 113

    Ennio Piano, Middle Tennessee State University

  • Fri
    24
    Sep
    2021
    5:00PM-6:00PMTrustmark Building 106 Courthouse Square, Oxford, MS

    Upper-Level of Trustmark Building on the Square. Free parking in the parking garage and parking lot. Enter through the door on the left of main entrance, go up the stairs to the venue.

    Featuring:

    Poetry by Lenna Mendoza

    Fiction by Alida Reyes

    Moderated by Joshua Nguyen.

    BYOB

    Social Hour at the Blind Pig after!

    We kindly ask that if you are unvaccinated and choose to attend, that you remain masked and social distance from others.

  • Tue
    28
    Sep
    2021
    3:00 pmAnthropology Lab (Lamar 114)

    Participate in the interactive portion of the Hostile Terrain 94 Exhibit from 3:00-5:00PM, where volunteers fill out the toe tags that will make up the collection displayed in Lamar Hall in October.

    Hostile Terrain 94 (HT94) is a participatory art project sponsored and organized by the Undocumented Migration Project (UMP), a non-profit research-art-education-media collective, directed by anthropologist Jason De León. The exhibition is composed of over 3,200 handwritten toe tags that represent migrants who have died trying to cross the Sonoran Desert of Arizona between the mid-1990s and 2019. These tags are geolocated on a wall map of the desert showing the exact locations where remains were found. This installation will simultaneously take place at a large number of institutions, both nationally and globally in 2021 throughout 2022.

    The Hostile Terrain 94 Exhibit will be accompanied by a lecture by the exhibit’s executive director,Jason De Léon, titled “The Land of Open Graves: Understanding the Current Politics of Migrant Life and Death along the U.S./Mexico Border,” in which he discusses the inherent political violence that is tied to the decomposition of the bodies of deceased migrants. This lecture will take place on September 30th at 4pm in Nutt Auditorium.

     

  • Wed
    29
    Sep
    2021
    1:00 pmAnthropology Lab (Lamar 114)

    Participate in the interactive portion of the Hostile Terrain 94 Exhibit from 1:00-3:00PM, where volunteers fill out the toe tags that will make up the collection displayed in Lamar Hall in October.

    Hostile Terrain 94 (HT94) is a participatory art project sponsored and organized by the Undocumented Migration Project (UMP), a non-profit research-art-education-media collective, directed by anthropologist Jason De León. The exhibition is composed of over 3,200 handwritten toe tags that represent migrants who have died trying to cross the Sonoran Desert of Arizona between the mid-1990s and 2019. These tags are geolocated on a wall map of the desert showing the exact locations where remains were found. This installation will simultaneously take place at a large number of institutions, both nationally and globally in 2021 throughout 2022.

    The Hostile Terrain 94 Exhibit will be accompanied by a lecture by the exhibit’s executive director,Jason De Léon, titled “The Land of Open Graves: Understanding the Current Politics of Migrant Life and Death along the U.S./Mexico Border,” in which he discusses the inherent political violence that is tied to the decomposition of the bodies of deceased migrants. This lecture will take place on September 30th at 4pm in Nutt Auditorium.

     

  • Wed
    29
    Sep
    2021
    5-7pmOxford Powerhouse

    Special Sarahfest Pop-up art exhibit to showcase work from current and formerly incarcerated individuals

    See Us Differently is a multimedia exhibit comprising bookmaking, paintings, mixed media sculptures, and graphic narratives based on Milton’s Paradise Lost and Shelley’s Frankenstein, were created by current and formerly incarcerated individuals taking free college courses through Common Good Atlanta (CGA). The exhibit is being brought to Oxford through a partnership with CGA, Emory University, and the Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies. It is also made possible through co-sponsorships with the Creative Writing Concentration program at the University of Mississippi and the Yoknapatawpha Arts Council in Oxford.

    The exhibit, at the Oxford Powerhouse located at 413 S 14th Street, will only be available Sept. 29 from 5-7 pm. A special program begins at 5:30, with a pre-recorded Zoom call of artists Noe Martinez, Janine Solursh, and Katrina Butler, who were unable to attend the show. Afterward, there will be an in-person roundtable discussion with Bill Taft, CGA academic director, Patrick Rodriguez, director of advocacy and community engagement and CGA alumnus, and Matt Bondurant, director of the UM Creative Writing Concentration Program. The event is free and open to the public. Masks are required.

    For more information about the venue, call the Powerhouse Community Arts Center at 662-236-6429. For information about the event and to request disability services, visit

     https://www.sarahfest.rocks.

  • Thu
    30
    Sep
    2021
    4:00 pmNutt Auditorium

    “The Land of Open Graves: Understanding the Current Politics of Migrant Life and Death along the U.S./Mexico Border” by Jason De LéonJason De Leon

    Since the mid-1990s, the U.S. federal government has relied on a border enforcement strategy known as Prevention through Deterrence. Using various security infrastructure and techniques of surveillance, this strategy funnels undocumented migrants toward remote and rugged terrain such as the Sonoran Desert of Arizona with the hope that mountain ranges, extreme temperatures, and other natural obstacles will deter people from unauthorized entry. Hundreds of people perish annually while undertaking this dangerous activity. Since 2009, the Undocumented Migration Project has used a combination of forensic, archaeological, and ethnographic approaches to understand the various forms of violence that characterize the social process of clandestine migration. On Thursday, September 30, at 4:00 p.m., Jason De León will present a lecture that focuses on what happens to the bodies of migrants who die in the desert. He argues that the way that bodies decompose in this environment is a form of hidden political violence that has deep ideological roots, and he demonstrates how the postmortem destruction of migrant corpses creates devastating forms of long-lasting trauma.

    Jason De León is a professor of anthropology and Chicana, Chicano, and Central American studies at UCLA. He is executive director of the Undocumented Migration Project, a research-arts-education collective that seeks to document and raise awareness about the experiences of clandestine migrants, and president of the board of directors for the Colibri Center for Human Rights, a nonprofit organization that seeks to identify and repatriate the remains of people who have died while migrating through the Sonoran Desert of Arizona. De León is the author of the award-winning book “The Land of Open Graves: Living and Dying on the Migrant Trail” and is a 2017 MacArthur Fellow.

    This lecture is part of the Movement and Migration/Future of the South Initiative, launched by Simone Delerme in 2019. An accompanying exhibit, Hostile Terrain, will be on display in Lamar Hall beginning on Oct. 15. This lecture is tentatively taking place in-person at the Nutt Auditorium on the University of Mississippi campus. Please visit the Center website for any updates to the location or format.

    De León’s visit is cosponsored by the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, the Honors College, the Center for Population Studies, the McLean Institute for Public Service and Community Engagement, the Center for Inclusion and Cross-Cultural Engagement, and the Croft Institute for International Studies.

  • Fri
    01
    Oct
    2021
    2:30 pmConner Hall 113

    Bright Osei, University of Mississippi

  • Tue
    05
    Oct
    2021
    5:30 pmBryant Hall, Room 209

    Dr. Sara Moslener, author of Virgin Nation: Sexual Purity and American Adolescence (Oxford University Press, 2015), writes about the Southern Baptist Convention's focus on abstinence-only education.  Her work continues to examine the intersections of "purity culture," male evangelicalism, race, and sex abuse.

    Please contact Dr. Mary Thurlkill (maryt@olemiss.edu) for information about 'reading groups' that discuss Dr. Moslener's writings in the weeks leading up to her visit.

  • Wed
    06
    Oct
    2021
    5:00 pmZoom (Details below)

    Dr. Kristina Killgrove will speak on 'Death Comes to Oplontis: Victims of Mt. Vesuvius Reveal Life in 79 AD'.

    Meeting ID: 997 5751 9967
    Password: Oplontis
    For questions or assistance, call 662-915-7097

  • Thu
    07
    Oct
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom (Details below)

    Margaret Cavendish on materialism and metaphysical structure

    Abstract: Margaret Cavendish is a materialist: she thinks that the only thing that exists is matter. It is easy to
    think that we know what this means and that we know what motivates a person to believe it: it means that there
    are no immaterial objects or properties, and it is motivated because restricting explanations and ontological
    posits to material things is naturalistic, parsimonious, or explanatorily beneficial in some other way. In this
    paper I argue that this is not the best way to understand the primary meaning and motivation of Cavendish’s
    materialism.
    Instead, it is first and foremost a commitment to a single-category, nonhierarchical ontology, which is to say,
    for her, an ontology of parts and wholes. As a part of this ontology, Cavendish eliminates all substance-property
    structure - a radical reductionist project that I briefly contrast with Spinoza’s reverse reductionist project. As
    usual with Cavendish, her metaphysics is fascinatingly unique but results from drawing out some of our deepest
    implicit metaphysical commitments. So on the way, I hope to shed a little light on materialism and physicalism
    more generally, as well as on the relationship between mereology and property metaphysics.

    The format of this event will be a workshop of Dr. Peterman’s paper. Requests for an advance copy of
    the paper, as well as the Zoom link, can be directed to Dr. Neil Manson (namanson@olemiss.edu).

    More information about future UM Philosophy Forum events can be found on the department calendar
    at www.philosophy.olemiss.edu

  • Thu
    07
    Oct
    2021
    4:00 pmBarnard Observatory Courtyard

    Aaron Cometbus and Scott Satterwhite will discuss the house at 309 6th Avenue in Pensacola, Florida.

    The house at 309 6th Avenue has long been a crossroads for punk rock, activism, veganism, and queer culture in Pensacola, a quiet Gulf Coast city at the border of Florida and Alabama. In A Punkhouse in the Deep South: The Oral History of 309, residents of 309 narrate the colorful and often comical details of communal life in the crowded and dilapidated house over its thirty-year existence. They tell of playing in bands, operating local businesses, forming feminist support groups, and creating zines and art.

    In this SouthTalk, Aaron Cometbus and Scott Satterwhite discuss this lively community that worked together to provide for their own needs while making a positive, lasting impact on their surrounding area. Together, these participants show that punk is more than music and teenage rebellion. It is about alternatives to standard narratives of living, acceptance for the marginalized in a rapidly changing world, and building a sense of family from the ground up.

    Cometbus has been publishing Cometbus magazine since 1981. He is the editor of the oral histories Back to the Land and The Dead End, and the author of seven novels. He earned a gold record using his teeth as a percussion instrument. Satterwhite is a historian, educator, and journalist. His work has appeared in Florida Historical QuarterlyHurricane ReviewINWeekly, and Maximum Rocknroll. He is the author of several poetry chapbooks and edits the zine Mylxine.Satterwhite holds an MA in American history and English. He teaches writing and literature at the University of West Florida.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted

  • Thu
    07
    Oct
    2021
    4:00pm-5:00pmLGBTQ Lounge, 4th Floor, Lamar Hall

    Brown Bag: Dr. Jaime Harker will discuss the Isom Center's work to create inclusive spaces in North Mississippi.

  • Fri
    08
    Oct
    2021
    12:00PM-1:00PMStarbucks in J.D. Williams Library

    Hard week? Come unwind Fridays after Class with some light conversation about the Dark Ages.

    Are you interested in the Middle Ages? Curious? On Fridays in the month of October, come hang out with others interested in "medieval stuff": UM classes, good books, board games, podcasts, movies, and (of course) "GOT."  Very informal. No prior study necessary!

    Learn more about Medieval Studies

     

  • Fri
    08
    Oct
    2021
    2:00 pmZoom (Contact Host for Details)

    Speaker: Dr. Bin Liu
    Assistant professor,  Department of Biological Sciences, Mississippi State University

    Hosts: Dr. Bloomekatz  and Dr. Qiu

  • Fri
    08
    Oct
    2021
    2:30 pmConner Hall 113

    Andreas Vortisch, University of Mississippi

  • Fri
    08
    Oct
    2021
    6:00 pmOff-Square Books, Oxford Square

    Joshua Nguyen in conversation with Aimee Nezhukumatathil about his new poetry collection, "Come Clean."

    Event to be held at Off-Square books in Oxford, Mississippi.

  • Sun
    10
    Oct
    2021
    7:00PM-9:30PMKennon Observatory

    We view the Moon, the planets, as well as double stars, though what we can see varies each month, depending on what is visible in the night sky during each scheduled open house.

     All these events are weather permitting. Admission is free. Children are welcome!

    See the Physics and Astronomy open house page for more information.

     

  • Mon
    11
    Oct
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    IDEAS: Inclusion, Diversity, Equity - Advancing Through Scholarship

    Dr. Amy McDowell, Associate Professor of Sociology

    Dr. Peter Wood, Instructional Assistant Professor of Theatre Arts

    This forum will be an informal conversation about the Queer Mississippi oral history project and how theatre can be used to creatively present research to broader audiences. Amy McDowell and Peter Wood will discuss their collaboration to meld theatre, sociology, and LGBTQ history in a classroom setting and talk about how students in one graduate seminar are using the Queer Mississippi archive to author an original script for theatrical performances.

    Register For this Event

  • Mon
    11
    Oct
    2021
    Fri
    05
    Nov
    2021
    8:00AM- 5:00PMGallery 130, Meek Hall

    Art Talks with Mellow Mountain Coalition, November 4 at 5:00 PM (Zoom)

  • Tue
    12
    Oct
    2021
    7:30 pmProud Larry's on the Square, Oxford, MS

    UM Jazz Combos, featuring, students, faculty, and friends.

  • Wed
    13
    Oct
    2021
    12:00 pmBarnard Observatory Courtyard

    Charles Reagan Wilson

    Reflecting the dramatic changes in southern society in the last twenty years, the South’s culture has been transformed. The increasing social diversity is leading to a multicultural society in which African Americans, Latinos, Asians, the white working classes, LGBT people, and others are claiming a new, dramatically different southern identity. In this SouthTalk, Charles Reagan Wilson explores how popular magazines have become a surprising carrier of this new identity to broad regional and national audiences.

    Wilson is professor emeritus of history and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi. He served as the director of the Center for the Study of Southern Culture (1998–2007) and the Kelly Gene Cook Sr. Chair of History (2007–15). He is the series editor of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, the coeditor of the Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, and the coeditor of The Mississippi Encyclopedia (2017). Frequently interviewed by such media outlets as CNN, the New York Times, the Washington Post, and southern newspapers and magazines, he has been an essayist and reviewer for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and the Raleigh News-Observer. Most recently, he served as an Obama Fellow at the Obama Institute of Transnational American Studies at the University of Mainz, Germany.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the ongoing health crisis, many events will be virtual, free, and made accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. 

  • Wed
    13
    Oct
    2021
    7:30 pmNutt Auditorium

    Recital featuring flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, and horn faculty performing with Adrienne Park, piano.

    Free admission.

  • Thu
    14
    Oct
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    Dr. Karen Tongson, Chair, Gender Studies Program, and Professor of Gender and Sexuality Studies, English and American Studies and Ethnicity, University of Southern California, will deliver the 8th annual Queer Studies Lecture.

    Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies, College of Liberal Arts, Division of Diversity, and the Isom LGBTQ Arts, Culture, and Community Development Fund

    Registration for the event via this Link

  • Fri
    15
    Oct
    2021
    2:00 pmZoom (Contact Host for Details)

    Speaker: Dr. Norris (EJ) Edney III
    Ed.D. Director, Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement, University of Mississippi

    Host: Biology Graduate Student Society

  • Fri
    15
    Oct
    2021
    7:30 pmMusic Building- UM Band Hall

    Award winning Producer, Director, Actor, Singer, and Songwriter Blake McIver Ewing, who will be serving as a visiting faculty artist in the Department of Music, will be performing an evening of songs from some of his favorite female voices from Barbra Streisand and Carole King to Lady Gaga and Alicia Keys, actor/singer/producer/director Blake McIver Ewing salutes his favorite women artists with a cabaret performance with pianist Amanda Johnston

    Department of Music, Sarah Isom Center for Women’s and Gender Studies and Living Music Resource

  • Mon
    18
    Oct
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    Dr. Mikaëla M. Adams of the Arch Dalrymple III Department of History

    Associate Professor of Native American History

    The Are You Ready? Dialogue Series seeks to provide space for participants to learn about challenging topics, listen to fellow campus community members share their perspectives and knowledge, and take away skills and practices they can implement for themselves and within their communities at the University of Mississippi and beyond.

    Registration Zoom Link

  • Mon
    18
    Oct
    2021
  • Wed
    20
    Oct
    2021
    5:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    Douglas McCulloh is an artist based in Southern California. He was one of the creators of The Great Picture, the largest photograph ever made (31 feet by 107 feet!)

    http://www.douglasmcculloh.com/projects

    Register in advance for this meeting:
    https://olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMucOqurDkqGdNDvdNFpG2TvGrOGPFwnGwX
    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

  • Tue
    26
    Oct
    2021
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Zara Bagdasarian
    Department of Physics
    University of California — Berkeley

    The latest breakthrough in neutrino physics is the first experimental evidence of the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) fusion cycle in the Sun. The discovery was possible due to the unprecedented radiopurity of the Borexino liquid-scintillator detector (Italy), employing innovative hardware and software developments. In the future, new technologies can further facilitate access to a broad physics agenda and applications in neutrino physics. Of particular interest are the cutting-edge detection techniques and novel target materials that aim to fully utilize both scintillation and Cherenkov signals from low- and high-energy neutrino interactions. The first deployment of Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors (LAPPDs) and water-based liquid scintillator (WbLS) in the ANNIE experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (USA) will be exciting milestones in the evolution of neutrino detection. Neutrino Experiment One (NEO) will be the first ktonne-scale detector built by the Watchman collaboration at Boulby Underground Laboratory (UK). Its goal is to demonstrate, for the first time, nuclear non-proliferation capabilities using antineutrino detection. Finally, the multi-ktonne detector, Theia, aims to detect solar neutrinos, determine neutrino mass ordering and the CP-violating phase, observe diffuse supernova neutrinos and neutrinos from a supernova burst, search for nucleon decay, and, ultimately, neutrinoless double beta decay.

     

     

    Join Zoom Meeting 

    Meeting ID: 919 282 27187

  • Wed
    27
    Oct
    2021
    12:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    Jessica Ingram and David Wharton

    Jessica Ingram’s Road through Midnight: A Civil Rights Memorial was shortlisted for the 2020 Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation First PhotoBook Award and named one of the New York Times Best Art Books of 2020. The result of nearly a decade of research and fieldwork, Ingram’s work unlocks complex histories of the civil rights era, reframing commonplace landscapes as sites of both remembrance and resistance—as the fight for civil rights goes on and memorialization has become the literal subject of contested cultural and societal ground.

    Ingram works with multimedia and archives to explore the ethos of communities and notions of progress and resistance in American culture. Raised in Tennessee, she received her BFA from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts and her MFA from California College of the Arts. Her work has been featured in the New Yorker, the New York TimesOxford AmericanViceWired, NPR, and as an official selection at the Sundance Film Festival.

    In this SouthTalk about her work and on Road through Midnight, Ingram will be in conversation with assistant professor of Southern Studies and director of documentary studies David Wharton. Wharton has an MFA in photography and a PhD in American studies, both from the University of Texas at Austin. He is the author of three books of photographs, with a fourth due to be published in 2022. He has taught at the University of Mississippi’s Center for the Study of Southern Culture since 1999.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the ongoing health crisis, many events will be virtual, free, and made accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the event link.

    Zoom Registration Link

  • Fri
    29
    Oct
    2021
    Sun
    31
    Oct
    2021
    Ford Center for the Performing Arts

    Book by Heather Hach
    Music and Lyrics by Laurence O'Keefe, Neil Benjamin
    Based on the novel by Amanda Brown and the Metro-Goldwyn Mayer motion picture
    Directed by Rory Ledbetter
    Choreography by Nicole Fava

    October 29 – October 30 at 7:30pm
    October 30 – October 31 at 2:00pm
    Ford Center for the Performing Arts

    A fabulously fun award-winning musical based on the adored movie, Legally Blonde The Musical, follows the transformation of Elle Woods as she tackles stereotypes and scandal in pursuit of her dreams. Action-packed and exploding with memorable songs and dynamic dances - this musical is so much fun, it should be illegal!

    Elle Woods appears to have it all. Her life is turned upside down when her boyfriend Warner dumps her so he can attend Harvard Law. Determined to get him back, Elle ingeniously charms her way into the prestigious law school. While there, she struggles with peers, professors and her ex. With the support of some new friends, though, Elle quickly realizes her potential and sets out to prove herself to the world.

    For tickets, visit the Department of Theatre & Film website.

  • Fri
    29
    Oct
    2021
    7:30 pmBand Hall Music Building

    Conlee and Hogan perform with the UM student bands they've trained up this week. Produced by the Sarah Isom Center and UM Music.

    Free admission.

  • Fri
    29
    Oct
    2021
    5:00PM-6:00PMTrustmark Building 106 Courthouse Square, Oxford, MS

    Upper-Level of Trustmark Building on the Square. Free parking in the parking garage and parking lot. Enter through the door on the left of main entrance, go up the stairs to the venue.

    Featuring:

    Poetry by Marina Greenfeld

    Fiction by Di Bei

    Moderated by Maggie Graber.

    BYOB

    Social Hour at the Blind Pig after!

    We kindly ask that if you are unvaccinated and choose to attend, that you remain masked and social distance from others.

  • Sat
    30
    Oct
    2021
    3:00 pmNutt Auditorium

    Host Balach talks to Conlee and Hogan about gender, music, and success.

    Free admission and open to the public.

  • Thu
    04
    Nov
    2021
    5:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    Collaborations by Memphis artists Tad Lauritzen Wright and Hamlett Dobbins, whose exhibition will take place at Gallery 130, Meek Hall from October 11th to November 5th, 8:00AM-5:00PM.
    https://mellowmountainart.com

    Register in advance for this meeting:
    https://olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJ0sd-CoqjopE9JnfbQDkPM_jgodv19aswEe
    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

  • Fri
    12
    Nov
    2021
    2:00 pmZoom (Details below)

    Speaker: Dr.Rob Laport
    Associate professor,  Department of Biology, Rhodes College

    Host: Dr. Hoeksema

  • Mon
    15
    Nov
    2021
    Fri
    19
    Nov
    2021
    Gallery 130 Meek Hall

    November 15-19
    BFA Thesis Exhibition
    Closing Reception: Thursday, November 18, 4:30–6:00 PM

  • Thu
    18
    Nov
    2021
    4:30–6:00 PMGallery 130 Meek Hall

    November 15-19
    BFA Thesis Exhibition
    Closing Reception: Thursday, November 18, 4:30–6:00 PM

  • Fri
    19
    Nov
    2021
    7:30 pmGertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts

    Purchase tickets online or call the UM Box Office at 662-915-7411.

    Visit UM Opera Theatre at opera.olemiss.edu for more information about the show.

  • Fri
    28
    Jan
    2022
    7:30 pmGertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts

    Sam Bush
    Mike Marshall
    Edgar Meyer
    George Meyer

    American Music masters Sam Bush, Mike Marshall and Edgar Meyer join together with George Meyer for a special collaboration usually only heard on the summer bluegrass festival circuit! Expect to hear works from the genre bending Short Trip Home album of many years ago as well as new music written especially for this tour. Edgar’s son George is charting his own course in the musical world and represents the next generation of artists expressing their unique voices and perspective. He certainly has strong roots!

    For assistance related to a disability, contact Jennifer Pardoe: jgpardoe@olemiss.edu | 662-915-7411

     

  • Tue
    01
    Feb
    2022
    1:00 pmBryant Hall Gallery
    Brown Bag: Can LGBTQ-themed books be pulled from public library because of community's Christian concerns? See Ridgeland, MS, article attached.
    Ridgeland Mayor (Mississippi Free Press)

    "Religion for Lunch" series, first Tuesday of each month.  This month we'll consider a news article about Ridgeland, MS, mayor who plans to withhold Public Library funding until removal of LGBTQ-themed books that collide with his-- and many constituents'-- Christian beliefs.   Topics of discussion include 'rights of representation' and religious freedoms.

    For assistance related to a disability, contact Mary Thurlkill: maryt@olemiss.edu | 6622027536

  • Wed
    02
    Feb
    2022
    5:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

    Invitation: We meet every two Wednesdays, to practice our Spanish in spontaneous conversation. Open to everyone in the Oxford community.

      Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

      "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee (former Uptown Coffee) by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

      No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

      Meeting dates - Spring 2022: Feb. 2, 16; March 2, 23; Apr. 6, 20; May 4

      Follow us on Instagram: @elcafeolemiss

      For assistance related to a disability, contact Irene Kaufmann Cotelo: ikaufman@olemiss.edu | 6628010889

    • Thu
      10
      Feb
      2022
      5:30 pmBarnard Observatory, Gammill Gallery

      Lectures: The artwork of Nadia Alexis: photographer, poet, and creative-writing-concentration doctoral student at UM.

      On Feb. 10 at 5:30 p.m. in Barnard Observatory’s Gammill Gallery, Nadia Alexis presents “What Endures.”  The artwork of Nadia Alexis—photographer, poet, and creative-writing-concentration doctoral student at the University of Mississippi—will be shown in the Gammill Gallery in Barnard Observatory this spring. The photographs in her series “What Endures” focus on the enduring spirit of Black women and contribute to the conversation on how Black women exist in photography.

      The photographs in this series began as an independent study course that Alexis took in the UM Department of Art and Art History, where she was inspired to make photographs informed by her personal experiences and those of other Black women survivors of trauma. The images in her exhibi­tion are of Alexis and her mother, all of which were taken outdoors in Oxford. The images explore themes of survival, freedom, and transcendence.

      “What Endures” will exhibit in Gammill Gallery from Jan. 10 to Feb. 18. During this Gamill Gallery walk and reception, Alexis will speak briefly about her exhibition and take questions.

      SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory. However, as a result of the ongoing health crisis, some events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit southernstudies.olemiss.edu for more details.

      For assistance related to a disability, contact Afton Thomas: amthoma4@olemiss.edu |

    • Tue
      15
      Feb
      2022
      6:00PM-7:00PMHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

      Dr. Maria Weber from the Department of Math and Sciences at Delta State University will present "Magnetic Furnaces: The Secret Lives of Middle-Aged Stars."

      We live with a star – the Sun! Stars have a secret life beyond what we can see with the naked eye. Some slowly fizzle out over billions of years, and some go out with a bang. Join astrophysicist Dr. Maria Weber as she discusses the lifecycle and magnetism of stars like the Sun, which are living out their middle-aged years between birth and death building intense magnetism in their deep interiors – magnetism which may impact their orbiting worlds. Find out how well we can predict the Sun’s magnetic behavior, if we should be concerned, and how our work to understand the Sun helps us better understand habitable worlds throughout the galaxy

      When: Tuesday, February 15, 2022, 6:00pm - 7:00pm.

      Where: Heartbreak (formerly called Uptown) Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford, Mississippi 38655

      or you can join virtually via: https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/99989536748

      Cost: Free!

      Oxford Science Café: Monthly conversations about the science we know and the science we don't know. Everyone is invited, and children are welcome! Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

      For assistance related to a disability, contact Jake Bennett: jvbenet@olemiss.edu |

    • Wed
      16
      Feb
      2022
      12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

      Lectures:  Berkley Hudson presents 'Listening to the Mississippi Pictures of O.N. Pruitt.'

        At noon on Feb. 16, Berkley Hudson presents “Listening to the Mississippi Pictures of O.N. Pruitt.” Originating in the Jim Crow era from Columbus, Mississippi, the photographs of O.N. Pruitt (1891–1967) offer a vehicle to consider the vexing interrelations of photography, community, culture, race, and historical memory. During this SouthTalk, Columbus, Mississippi-native and author of “O.N. Pruitt’s Possum Town: Photographing Trouble and Resilience in the American South,” Hudson will share some of Pruitt’s photography and reflect on some of the images and themes captured.

        Hudson is an associate professor emeritus of the Missouri School of Journalism. For 25 years he worked as a journalist, part of which at the Los Angeles Times. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Mississippi, where he majored in history and journalism. Later, he received a master’s from Columbia University and a doctorate from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He was born in Columbus, Mississippi, and lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

        SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory. However, as a result of the ongoing health crisis, some events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit southernstudies.olemiss.edu for more details. Locations listed here are subject to change, and more events may be added throughout the semester.

        For assistance related to a disability, contact Afton Thomas: amthoma4@olemiss.edu |

      • Wed
        23
        Feb
        2022
        12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

        Lectures: Castel Sweet presents ''Does My Message Define My Role?' Hip-Hop Artists' Interpretation of Having a Role in Their Community.'

          At noon on Feb. 23, Castel Sweet presents “‘Does My Message Define My Role?’ Hip-Hop Artists’ Interpretation of Having a Role in Their Community.” Using data from interviews with hip-hop artists, Castel Sweet will discuss how artists’ emphasis on their music’s message influences their interpretation of having a role, or identifiable place, in their local community. Considering the significance of space and place within hip-hop music, Sweet examines how respondents’ identities as artists are shaped by their local communities and how artists’ identities influence their production of hip-hop music. Sweet explores if and how hip-hop artists maintain connections to their local communities and construct localized identities within a global market that encourages the deterritorialization of music.

          Sweet is the director of the University of Mississippi’s Center for Community Engagement in the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, and assistant professor of practice in community engagement. In addition to her work as a community engagement professional, Sweet’s qualitative research explores the ways in which hip-hop artists use their art to pursue social change and community engagement.

          SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory. However, as a result of the ongoing health crisis, some events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website at southernstudies.olemiss.edu for more details. Locations listed here are subject to change, and more events may be added throughout the semester. Registration will be required for all virtual events in order to receive the webinar link.

          For assistance related to a disability, contact Afton Thomas: amthoma4@olemiss.edu |

        • Fri
          25
          Feb
          2022
          Sat
          26
          Feb
          2022
          7:30 pmMeek Auditorium

          Legally Blonde

          Written by Anne Marie Cammarato
          Directed by Peter Wood

          Hazel is about a family struggling to survive a climate that has collapsed, bringing continual storms and emptying out their hometown. Even as the storms rage and food becomes scarce, they also struggle with their mother’s increasing dementia and confusion. When one of the two sisters becomes pregnant, the decision to stay in the land they still consider home becomes a point of contention and disagreement.

        • Mon
          28
          Feb
          2022
          4:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

          Dr. Donald Cole, an emeritus upper administrator and faculty
          member in Mathematics recently charged the campus, at the
          ceremony dedicating the renaming of the Martindale-Cole
          building, to follow what he called the “Cole-Martindale Principle”
          which “embraces inclusion, values diversity and demands equity”.
          In pursuit of further discussing this principle, special guests Dr. Donald Cole,
          Dr. Carla Cotwright-Williams, and Dr. Richard Doss will provide a window into the history
          of some of the most impactful equity-focused initiatives for African American students in
          STEM and beyond at the University of Mississippi. The goal of this conversation is to
          support increased understanding and awareness of the importanceof McNair, IMAGE,
          AGEM, and similar initiatives, to inspire equity-minded change by members of our
          College of Liberal Arts community and all and to better support student success inside
          and outside the classroom keeping in mind the importance of building a sense of
          mattering and inclusion for students of color at the University of Mississippi.

          Registration Link

        • Fri
          04
          Mar
          2022
          10AM-12PMThe Inn at Ole Miss, Ballroom A
        • Fri
          04
          Mar
          2022
          2:30 pmConner Hall 113

          Speaker Todd Jones, Mississippi State University

        • Mon
          07
          Mar
          2022
          6:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

          2022 University of Mississippi Humanities Teacher of the Year Dr. Allen Clark

          Associate Professor of Arabic & Codirector of Arabic Language Flagship Program

          Lecture: "Language as Music: What are we speaking exactly?"

        • Mon
          07
          Mar
          2022
          2PM-4PMSally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College- In the kitchen, first floor

          El Cafe de los Lunes" is back in person at the Honors College!

          Join our time for casual conversation in Spanish.

          We will meet all Mondays this Spring semester 2-4pm at the Honors College kitchen (on the first floor).

          El Profesor Enrique Cotelo and Spanish graduate student Stéfano LePham will moderate conversation. Stop by and visit for a few minutes, or for the whole two hours. Listen, talk to others, and make new friends.

          These sessions are designed to encourage communication in Spanish in a relaxed, friendly, and casual setting.

          Follow us on:

          Facebook: El café de los lunes,

          Twitter: @elcafedeloslune

          Email: ecotelo@olemiss.edu

          ¡Ven a practicar tu español en un ámbito informal y distendido!

          Sin presiones: ven a escuchar, a hablar, y a conocer amigos nuevos!

          This event is part of a series:

          For assistance related to a disability, contact Dr. Enrique Cotelo: ecotelo@olemiss.edu |

           

        • Tue
          08
          Mar
          2022
          12:15PM-1:15PMBryant Hall Gallery

          We'll consider aspects of Russian and Ukrainian Orthodox Christianity-- including their history and contemporary conflicts.  Dr. Valentina Iepuri, Associate Professor and Director of the Russian Language Program, will join the discussion and help us understand the region's Orthodox religious identities.  Attendees might review the attached article to frame the discussion: Russian and Ukrainian Orthodoxies

          For assistance related to a disability, contact Mary Thurlkill: maryt@olemiss.edu | 6622027536

           

        • Tue
          08
          Mar
          2022
          5:30 pmBryant Hall 209

          with Ryan Tucker Jones

          Ryan Tucker Jones is Ann Swindells Professor of Global Environmental
          History at the University of Oregon. He is the author of Empire of
          Extinction: Russians and the North Pacific’s
          Strange Beasts of the Sea (Oxford UP) as well
          as the forthcoming Red Leviathan: The Secret
          History of Soviet Whaling (U Chicago Press)
          and co-editor of Across Species and Cultures:
          Whales, Humans, and Pacific Worlds (UHawaii).

          Free and open to the public

          For more information or if you require assistance relating to a disability, please contact the Department
          of History at 915-7148 or history@olemiss.edu.
        • Wed
          09
          Mar
          2022
          12:00 pmBarnard Observatory Courtyard

          Lectures: The Art in Barnard Lecture complements our yearlong theme of 'Mississippi Voices' by featuring Greenwood artist Yolande Van Heerden

          At noon on Wednesday, March 9, Yolande van Heerden will give the Art in Barnard Lecture in the Courtyard behind Barnard Observatory. This semester, the Art in Barnard Lecture will complement the Center’s yearlong theme of “Mississippi Voices” by featuring fiber artist and art instructor Yolande van Heerden of Greenwood, Mississippi. Van Heerden teaches a wide range of art classes, including sewing, quilting, and garment/fiber art projects. A native of South Africa, van Heerden celebrates her homeland’s cultural diversity through her community outreach work, and she draws up the richness of its fabric tradition in her own creations. She works as an art teacher for groups of small children, conducts courses in sewing at ArtPlace Mississippi, and has coordinated multiple community-wide quilting projects for organizations including the Museum of the Mississippi Delta.

          In her SouthTalk, van Heerden will discuss some of the projects she has led in partnership with the nonprofit ArtPlace Mississippi. Projects have included community fashion shows, featuring clothing sewn by young Greenwood students, several community quilt creations sewn by both children and adults that reflect different social or natural themes, and public art programs, including “silent wind chimes” included in the Katrina Cottage project in Greenwood’s Baptist Town neighborhood and in the Keep Greenwood Strong campaign early in the pandemic.

           SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory. However, as a result of the ongoing health crisis, some events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website at southernstudies.olemiss.edu for more details.

          For assistance related to a disability, contact Afton Thomas: amthoma4@olemiss.edu |

        • Thu
          10
          Mar
          2022
          6:00 pmPowerhouse Community Arts Center

          The screening is at 6 p.m. Thursday (March 10) at the Powerhouse Community Arts Center. It is free and open to the public, but organizers ask that those planning to attend register at OxfordArts.com to help prepare activities for the children.

          Read more about this event: Campus and Community Partners Spotlight Issue of Childcare Access

        • Fri
          11
          Mar
          2022
          12:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

          At noon on Friday, March 11, there will be a virtual SouthTalk with Stephen Fafulas and Matt Van Hoose titled “Voces Sureñas: Case Studies of Spanish in Northern Mississippi and Eastern North Carolina.” Although the U.S. South has experienced a significant Latinx demographic shift in recent decades, we still know little about the sociolinguistic implications of these changes. In their talk, Fafulas and Van Hoose consider how Spanish speakers’ language practices and patterns—such as code-switching and discourse markers—can be said to constitute the voice of Spanish-speaking communities in both north Mississippi and in eastern North Carolina.

          Fafulas is assistant professor of Spanish at the University of Mississippi. Van Hoose is executive director of academic engagement at Howard Community College in Columbia, Maryland.

          SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory. However, as a result of the ongoing health crisis, some events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website at southernstudies.olemiss.edu for more details. Locations listed here are subject to change, and more events may be added throughout the semester. Registration Link

          For assistance related to a disability, contact Afton Thomas: amthoma4@olemiss.edu

        • Fri
          11
          Mar
          2022
          7:45PM-9:00PMKennon Observatory

          We are offering a viewing of the sky with out telescopes in Kennon Observatory on March 11, Friday night, 7:45-9:00 pm.

          We’ll be looking at the Moon. The half-Moon is always great!

          Uranus is tiny and dim in the telescope.

          We’ll look at the Pleades and the Orion nebula.

          The event is free, families are welcome.

          Viewing is not possible when the sky is cloudy - if that happens we’ll have to cancel and ask everyone to come back in exact 4 weeks for another try.

          For assistance related to a disability, contact Tibor Torma: ttorma@phy.olemiss.edu | 915-5627

        • Mon
          21
          Mar
          2022
          7:00 pmBondurant 204C Auditorium

          Dr. Sharon P. Holland
          Townsend Ludington Distinguished Professor
          and Chair of American Studies at the
          University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

          Dr. Holland is the author of Raising the Dead: Readings of
          Death and (Black) Subjectivity (2000), The Erotic Life of
          Racism (2012), and (with historian Tiya Miles) Crossing Waters
          / Crossing Worlds: The African Diaspora in Indian Country
          (2006), a collection of trans-Atlantic Afro-Native criticism.

        • Tue
          22
          Mar
          2022
          6:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

          Dawn Wilkins, UM chair and professor of computer and information science

        • Wed
          23
          Mar
          2022
          4:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

          Register in advance for this meeting: Registration Link

        • Wed
          23
          Mar
          2022
          5:30 pmCroft 107

          SPONSORED BY THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI AND THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI
          DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE, DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY, AND THE CROFT INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
          For more information or if you require assistance relating to a disability, please contact croft@olemiss.edu or 662.915.1500.

        • Thu
          24
          Mar
          2022
          6:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

          Steven Phelps, professor of integrative biology and director of the Center for Brain, Behavior and Evolution at the University of Texas

        • Thu
          24
          Mar
          2022
        • Fri
          25
          Mar
          2022
          12:00 pmZoom (Preregister)

        • Fri
          25
          Mar
          2022
          4:00 pmMusic Building Room 148

          Interiority listens to an outside through itself, as itself, and upon recognition of this forms a looped experiential substrate in which there isn't definitively a separate self that listens, but only listening. The sounds we hear, along with the awareness that forms an image of them, are made of (and move within) the same substances; they are both in consciousness- one as the representation/ translation of some supposed external object, the other as the awareness of that object. Nature persists as an appearance to an interiority, but that same interiority is merely the frame which houses the perception of all outer things. In this talk I will ask how the above relates to a music-theoretical practice and the construction of aesthetic ideas that reconfigure the perceptual situation as the diagrammatic condition for a mode of possible listening (where listening, in turn, is the process of hearing).

        • Fri
          25
          Mar
          2022
          7:30 pmGertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts
        • Fri
          25
          Mar
          2022
        • Mon
          28
          Mar
          2022
          4:00 pmBarnard Observatory
        • Mon
          28
          Mar
          2022
          5:30 pmBryant 209

          Dr. Elizabeth Marlowe (Colgate University)

          This talk will examine how some museums have responded to shifting public opinion around restitution, and some of the duplicitous strategies they resort to in order to hold onto artworks obtained by dubious means.

          Sponsored by the Department of Classic, Department of Art and Art History, and the Museum Studies Minor

          For questions or assistance, call 662-915-7097
        • Mon
          28
          Mar
          2022
          7:30 pmGertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts
        • Wed
          30
          Mar
          2022
          Fri
          01
          Apr
          2022
          Oxford, Mississippi

          WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2022

          5:00 p.m.  An OCB Warm-up Event
          Sam Pink (The Ice Cream Man and Other Stories), Big Bruiser Dope Boy (Something Gross), with guest musician Thomas Dollbaum
          The End of All Music

          6:30 p.m. The Future of the South Lecture
          Imani Perry (South to America: A Journey below the Mason-Dixon to Understand the Soul of a Nation), with Derrick Harriell
          Nutt Auditorium

          7:30 p.m. Book Conference Authors Party
          Co-hosted by the Friends of the Library
          Memory House
          406 University Ave.
          (Advance Ticket Required) 

          THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2022

          9:30 a.m.  The Fight for Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer
          Kate Clifford Larson (Walk with Me: A Biography of Fannie Lou Hamer), in conversation with Ted Ownby
          Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics

          11:00 a.m.  Welcome Lunch at Archives and Special Collections
          Hosted by the Friends of the Library
          Archives and Special Collections
          J.D. Williams Library
          (Lunch is free, but registration appreciated)

          11:30 a.m. Mississippi Humanities Council Presents “Reflecting Mississippi
          Ralph Eubanks (A Place Like Mississippi: A Journey through a Real and Imagined Literary Landscape), welcome by Jennifer Ford
          Archives and Special Collections
          J.D. Williams Library

          1:00 p.m. Remediating Region: New Media and the US South
          Gina Caison, Austin Svedjan, Sherita Johnson, and Margaret T. McGehee, with Katie McKee introducing session
          Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics

          2:30 p.m. National Book Foundation Presents
          Robert Jones Jr. (The Prophets) and Jason Mott (Hell of a Book), with Ralph Eubanks moderating
          Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics

          4:30 p.m. Poetry in the Gallery
          Charlotte Pense (Code), Joshua Nguyen (Come Clean), and Marcella Sulak (City of Skypapers), with Beth Ann Fennelly introducing session
          Southside Gallery on the Oxford Square

          6:00 p.m. Thacker Mountain Radio
          Poet Kendra Allen (The Collection Plate: Poems), authors Jason Mott (Hell of a Book) and Nathan Harris (The Sweetness of Water), and musician Thomas Dollbaum
          Harrison’s 1810 (1210 Harrison Ave., just off the Square)

          FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 2022

          10:30 a.m. “Each Unhappy Family”: Memoir and Memory
          Liz Scheier (Never Simple: A Memoir) and Maud Newton (Ancestor Trouble: A Reckoning and a Reconciliation)
          Lafayette County Courthouse on the Oxford Square

          12:00 p.m. Poetry Talk and Lunch
          Marcella Sulak (City of Skypapers)
          Lafayette County and Oxford Public Library
          (Lunch is free, but registration appreciated)

          1:30 p.m. Writing from the Southwest Review
          Sam Pink (The Ice Cream Man and Other Stories), Kendra Allen (The Collection Plate: Poems), and William Boyle (Shoot the Moonlight Out), with Bobby Rea moderating
          Lafayette County Courthouse on the Oxford Square

          2:45 p.m. Reading and Conversation
          Raven Leilani (Luster), with introduction by Christy Conner and Q&A with Ser Álida
          Lafayette County Courthouse on the Oxford Square

          4:00 p.m. The Presentation of the Willie Morris Awards in Southern Writing
          Monica Weatherly (“If I Had My Grandmama’s Praise”), introduction by Susan Kinsolving and in conversation with Derrick Harriell, and Nathan Harris (The Sweetness of Water), introduction by Jonathan Haupt and in conversation with Amber Nichols-Buckley
          Off Square Books on the Oxford Square

          5:15 p.m. A Willie Morris Awards and Oxford Conference for the Book Celebration
          Reception and Book Signing
          Hosted by the Willie Morris Awards in Southern Writing
          Off Square Books on the Oxford Square

        • Thu
          31
          Mar
          2022
          4:30 pmStudent Union Ballroom

          Dr. Kwame Anthony Appiah is an American philosopher, novelist, and scholar of African and African American studies, best known for his contributions to political philosophy, moral psychology, and the philosophy of culture. Named one of Foreign Policy's Top 100 public intellectuals and awarded a National Humanities Medal by the White House, Appiah currently teaches at NYU.

          About the Dunbar Lectures: We often come across discussions of policy-related issues in law, and frequently hear about particular laws being passed by congress or considered by courts. But we rarely take the time to ask basic questions, such as "What is law?" Established in 1987 by Jack and Wylene Dunbar, the Dunbar Lectures in Philosophy and Law invites nationally renowned public intellectuals to the University of Mississippi campus to explore philosophical themes in law, and to stimulate creative and analytical thinking concerning the law's role in society.

          For further information, or if you required assistance, please contact Dr. Neil Manson (namanson@olemiss.edu or 662-915-7020). This event is free and open to the public.

        • Thu
          31
          Mar
          2022
        • Fri
          01
          Apr
          2022
          10AM-5PMPeabody Hall

          7th Annual Conference featuring two formats for presenting research, education sessions, lunch and guest speaker Dr. Sergio Iñiguez from University of Texas El Paso. For more information, use this link: UM Conference on Psychological Science – Department of Psychology (olemiss.edu)

          ALL EVENTS WILL BE HELD IN PEABODY
          10:00 AM GRADUATE STUDENT Q&A PANEL (202)
          11:00 AM POSTER SESSION (ROOM 202)
          12:00 PM FREE PIZZA LUNCH
          01:00 PM DATA BLITZ (ROOM 206)
          03:30 PM CONFERENCE AWARDS (ROOM 206)
          04:00 PM KEYNOTE BY DR. SERGIO IÑIQUEZ (ROOM 206)
          Title: Behavioral and pharmacological preclinical approaches to study mood-related disorders.
          QUESTIONS?
          Email Dr. Todd Smitherman at tasmithe@olemiss.edu

          UM Conference on Psychological Science Flyer for the full schedule

           

        • Fri
          01
          Apr
          2022
          2:30 pmConner Hall 113

          Speaker Rob Reed, University of Alabama

        • Fri
          01
          Apr
          2022
        • Mon
          04
          Apr
          2022
          6:30 pmBondurant 204C Auditorium

          Sara Stephens Loomis, a PhD candidate in the Department of English, is the 2021-2022 Frances Bell McCool Dissertation Fellow in Faulkner Studies. Her dissertation is entitled "Diluvial Epistemologies in Flood Narratives of the US South Since 1927." She also holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Georgia College and State Univerity.

          For more information or if you require assistance relating to a disability, please contact the University of Mississippi Department of English at msgilmo1@olemiss.edu or 662-915-7439.

        • Tue
          05
          Apr
          2022
          11:30 amBishop 102

          Speaker Dr. Wafa Hassan is originally from Saudi Arabia and resides in Michigan. She has worked as an Arabic professor at Western Michigan University and Michigan State University and was Director of Outreach and K-12 Initiatives for the Arabic Language Flagship Program. She is currently the director of the Michigan Arabic Teachers' Council and the STARTALK Arabic Program. She is a co-author of the ACTFL National Standards for Learning Arabic as a Foreign Language and author of “Inclusion of ELL with Special Needs in General Education."

          Sponsored by the Arabic Language Flagship Program and the Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies

        • Fri
          08
          Apr
          2022
          Sat
          09
          Apr
          2022

          Annual Career & Professional Development Conference Career Exploration (Expo) & Symposium

          Summit Schedule

          Welcome Reception & Opening Keynote

          Friday, April 8th - 6:30PM

          Law School  - Dinner Provided

          2nd Annual Career Expo

          Saturday, April 9th - 9:00AM

          Bishop Hall First Floor

          2nd Annual Symposium: Workshops & Panel

          Saturday, April 9th - 11:00AM

          Bishop Hall - Lunch Provided

          Registration for the Annual BIPS Summit 

        • Fri
          08
          Apr
          2022
          2:30 pmConner Hall 113

          Speaker Ariell Zimran, Vanderbilt University

        • Fri
          08
          Apr
          2022
        • Wed
          13
          Apr
          2022
          4:30 pmSally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College

          The Honors Spring Art Showcase is returning to SMBHC! We are excited to come back together to celebrate art, music, and our creative community on campus. This year's theme explores ideas surrounding reconnection, resilience, and revival. The showcase is scheduled for April 13th, 2022 at 4:30pm in the Honors College. This show is open to all UM students & faculty. If you are interested in showcasing your physical artworks, performing for the showcase, or helping with the planning of the event, please fill out the HOCO Spring Art Showcase Participation Interest Form. If you have any questions, please contact Angel Morgan at ammorga3@go.olemiss.edu.”

           

        • Tue
          19
          Apr
          2022
          12:15 pmZoom (Details below)

          Learn about the role of renewable energy in international development and international development careers. Open to all majors and minors.

          Speaker: Dr. Ryan Shelby - Supervisory Regional Engineering Officer - USAID Southern Africa

          Zoom ID: 973 3064 9774. Email engaged@olemiss.edu with questions.

        • Tue
          19
          Apr
          2022
          6:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

          Science is fun at the Oxford Science Café! Join us for an exciting presentation by Dr. Jason Hoeksema (University of Mississippi)

          Dr. Jason Hoeksema, Professor of Biology at the University of Mississippi, will present: "Science and conservation for birds and humans on working lands in the Mississippi Delta."

          The Mississippi Delta was historically a vast wetland, covered with flooded woodlands, swamps, and oxbow lakes. These wetland habitats provided essential ecosystem services, including flood control and wildlife habitat. Today, most of these wetlands have been drained or diverted for agriculture, which supplies food and represents a key economic base in our region. Is there a way we can conserve and restore the ecosystem services of wetlands, while maintaining sustainable agricultural production? Delta Wind Birds (DWB) is a conservation non-profit based in Oxford, working to conserve existing wetlands and especially to create temporary wetlands on private lands in the Delta, including crop farms. Scientists from the University of Mississippi, the USDA-ARS, and Mississippi State University are partnering with DWB to study how these temporary wetlands may benefit migratory water birds, conserve soil, reduce downstream nutrient pollution, and improve crop yields

          You can join virtually via: https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/99989536748

          Cost: Free!

          Oxford Science Café: Monthly conversations about the science we know and the science we don't know. Everyone is invited, and children are welcome! Like us on Facebookand follow us on Twitter.

          For assistance related to a disability, contact Jake Bennett: jvbennet@olemiss.edu |

          Event posted by: jvbennet@olemiss.edu

          Sponsored by: Department of Physics and Astronomy, Provost/VC for Academic Affairs, UMWiP

        • Wed
          20
          Apr
          2022
          5:30 pmBryant Hall 209

          The Warren Debate Union (WDU) at the University of Mississippi would like to cordially invite you to a public debate event.

          The event is open to the public and free of charge. We encourage anyone interested to attend.

          The debate will be between 4 student members of the WDU and will cover the topic of transportation.


          The city of Oxford recently passed a rule that shifts all taxi and rideshare application traffic to three designated pickup locations around the iconic Oxford square. The change has been supported by many students but faced criticism from taxi drivers. We believe the new rule creates an opportunity to debate transit issues facing Oxford and the entire nation. The rapid rise of rideshare applications such as Uber has revolutionized transportation in the United States and opened up a debate about the role of traditional public transportation options in an era where getting a ride is as easy as clicking a button on your phone.


          We hope that the debate provides a unique educational opportunity to learn more about an important issue facing our community in Oxford, and that the debate can contribute to a conversation on campus about transportation policy.

          Please feel free to spread the word about this event.

          If you have any questions, please contact Director of Forensics Jacob Justice at jwjustic@olemiss.edu.

          For assistance related to a disability, contact Andrew Davis: addavis@olemiss.edu | 662-915-8819

          Event posted by: addavis@olemiss.edu

        • Thu
          21
          Apr
          2022
          6:30 amBryant Hall Room 111

          The Center for Practical Ethics presents, The Dialogue Initiative: Policy Talks

          2022 TOPIC: BIG DATA AND TECH IN DELIVERY OF HEALTHCARE IN RURAL AMERICA

          Presentations & Workshop: 1:00 – 5:30pm
          Bryant Hall, Room 111

          Reception: 5:30pm
          Bryant Hall, Farrington Gallery

          REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED - click here for RSVP

          Policy Talks will bring University of Mississippi faculty, alumni, business and industry experts, and community members together to focus on the ethical issues surrounding the topic, and seek informed solutions from a variety of perspectives and fields. Through an afternoon of presentations and conversations, panelists and attendees learn about recent industry practices, explore current academic educational and research models, and consider ethical challenges and goals. Policy Talks provides a unique opportunity for participants to network and engage in collaborative recommendations, “best practices” guidelines, and ethically-informed policy solutions.

          For more information on Policy Talks, please visit
          https://philosophy.olemiss.edu/policytalks/

          THE WORK OF THE CENTER FOR PRACTICAL ETHICS IS GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED BY MR. AND MRS. ALFRED HUME BRYANT.

          For assistance related to a disability, contact Deborah Mower: ethics@olemiss.edu | 662-915-7020

          Event posted by: eastland@olemiss.edu

          Sponsored by: See flyer for full list of event sponsors.

        • Thu
          21
          Apr
          2022
          Sun
          24
          Apr
          2022
          7:30 pmFulton Chapel

          Theatre & Film at the University of Mississippi is proud to present William Shakespeare's ROMEO AND JULIET. You may have seen this beloved classic before, but you have not seen this version! Join us for a fast-paced, modern retelling that is both a celebration of storytelling and a meditation on why we continue retelling this story in particular.

          The Friday, April 22 performance will include ASL interpreting and live-captioning services. A reception will follow in Bryant Hall.

          Tickets are $20 for the general public, $10 for students, and $15 for faculty and staff, and they may be purchased at the UM Box Office at the Ford Center by calling (662) 915-7411 or visiting olemissboxoffice.com

          For assistance relating to a disability, please contact Jordan Smith at theatre@olemiss.edu or (662) 915-5816.

        • Fri
          22
          Apr
          2022
        • Wed
          27
          Apr
          2022
          5:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

          Preregister with this link: Registration Link

        • Fri
          29
          Apr
          2022
        • Wed
          04
          May
          2022
          5:00PM-6:00PMHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

          Invitation: Every two Wednesdays, we meet for an hour to carry conversations in Spanish. Open to everyone in the Oxford community.

            Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

            "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee (former Uptown Coffee) by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

            No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

            Meeting dates - Spring 2022: Feb. 2, 16; March 2, 23; Apr. 6, 20; May 4

            For information: ikaufman@olemiss.edu

            For assistance related to a disability, contact Irene Kaufmann Cotelo: ikaufman@olemiss.edu

          • Thu
            19
            May
            2022
            7:30 pmGertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts

            Beautiful – The Carole King Musical tells the inspiring true story of King’s remarkable rise to stardom, from being part of a hit songwriting team with her husband Gerry Goffin, to her relationship with fellow writers and best friends Cynthia Weil and Barry Mann, to becoming one of the most successful solo acts in popular music history. Along the way, she made more than beautiful music, she wrote the soundtrack to a generation.

            Featuring a stunning array of beloved songs written by Gerry Goffin/Carole King and Barry Mann/Cynthia Weil, including “I Feel The Earth Move,” “One Fine Day,” “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman,” “You’ve Got A Friend” and the title song, BEAUTIFUL has a book by and Tony® Award-nominee and Academy® Award-nominated writer Douglas McGrath, direction by Marc Bruni, choreography by Josh Prince, and took home two 2014 Tony® Awards and a 2015 Grammy® Award.

            BEAUTIFUL – The Carole King Musical is recommended for ages 10 and up. There is no foul language, but there is talk about the use of drugs. 

            For assistance related to a disability, contact Jennifer Pardoe: jgpardoe@olemiss.edu | 662-915-7411

          • Thu
            26
            May
            2022
            Sun
            29
            May
            2022
            Oxford, Mississippi

            Join us in historic Oxford, Mississippi for "live" old-time piano playing this May. After a two-year hiatus due to the pandemic, the Contest is raring to go and contestants are signing up to compete. You can keep track of the 2022 contestants on our website.

            THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2022

            7:30 pm Tune-ups Party

             

            FRIDAY, MAY 27, 2022

            10:00 am Double-decker Bus Tour of historic Oxford

            2:00 pm Workshop with Carl Sonny Leyland

            3:00 pm Workshop with Brian Holland

            6:00 pm New Rag Contest

            8:00 pm Ragfest

             

            SATURDAY, MAY 28, 2022 

            9:00 am Junior Division Contest

            11:45 am Silent Movie Luncheon with Adam Swanson

            1:00 pm Preliminary Rounds: Regular & Senior Divisions

            6:30 pm After-hours & “Old-Time Sing-a-long”

             

            SUNDAY, MAY 29, 2022

            10:55 am Church Service at Oxford United Methodist

            1:00 pm Regular Division Semis & Finals / Seniors’ Final

            7:00 pm Red, White & Blue Salute to Veterans

             

            PURCHASE TICKETS
          • Fri
            27
            May
            2022
            3:00 pmLewis Hall Room 103A

            Invitation: Learn about experimental particle physics and actually investigate some real data from cutting edge experiments!

            The University of Mississippi is hosting the 20th conference on Flavor Physics and CP Violation (FPCP2022), an international particle physics conference, from May 23-27. On the final day of the conference, a Masterclass will be hosted on campus. The Masterclass is FREE and open to the public and will feature the opportunity to learn more about experimental particle physics and actually investigate some real data from cutting edge experiments!

            To help us get an idea of how many to expect, we ask that you please register for the event at https://relativity.phy.olemiss.edu/indico/event/342/registration 

            For assistance related to a disability, contact Jake Bennett: jvbennet@olemiss.edu

          • Mon
            22
            Aug
            2022
            Fri
            16
            Sep
            2022
          • Tue
            23
            Aug
            2022
            8:30 amLGBTQIA+ Lounge, Lamar Hall 4th Floor

            Join us for the annual LGBTQIA+ Welcome Back Social! We will have Oxsicles for you to enjoy. We want to welcome all LGBTQIA+ students, staff, and faculty, and allies to be in community as we start a new semester. Meet new people and connect with old friends.

            Join us in the LGBTQ+ Lounge on the 4th Floor of Lamar Hall at 3:30-5pm for some Oxsicles and community!

            For assistance related to a disability, contact Sarah Pinon: spinon@olemiss.edu | 662-915-1689

             

          • Sat
            27
            Aug
            2022
            10AM-2PMBryant Hall

            Meet new and returning LGBTQIA+ students and allies!

            The 2022 Fall Pride Camp will be held Saturday, August 27, 2022, at 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM, in Bryant Hall. This event is designed to provide fun networking opportunities and exposure to campus resources for students who are members of the LGBTQIA+ community and Allies. All current UM undergraduate, graduate, and professional students are invited to attend.

            Register for Fall Pride Camp Here!

            For assistance related to a disability, contact Sarah Pinon: spinon@olemiss.edu | 662-915-1689

            Sponsored by: Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

          • Sun
            04
            Sep
            2022
            7:45 pmKennon Observatory
            We are offering a viewing of the sky with out telescopes in Kennon Observatory on Sept 4, Sunday night, 7:45 - 9:15 PM.
            We’ll be looking at the Moon. The half-Moon is always great!
            We’ll look at Saturn, which is a great view, and Jupiter as it comes up around 9 pm.
            The event is free, families are welcome.
            Viewing is not possible when the sky is cloudy - if that happens we’ll have to cancel and ask everyone to come back in exact 4 weeks for another try.
            Sponsored by the Department of Physics and Astronomy
          • Tue
            06
            Sep
            2022
            4:00 pmCoulter Hall 211

            "SWIR Emitting Xanthene Based Chromophores for in vivo Fluorescence Imaging"

          • Tue
            06
            Sep
            2022
            4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

            Sina Rostami, Santosh Bhandari, Quinn Campagna
            Department of Physics and Astronomy
            University of Mississippi

            Student Research Presentations

            Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

          • Wed
            07
            Sep
            2022
            12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

            Roadside South

            David Wharton

            Documentary photographer David Wharton will discuss images in his Gammill Gallery exhibition, which includes photographs from his recently published fourth book, Roadside South, the third in his Trilogy of the American South series. The exhibition, also titled Roadside South, is currently on view in the Gammill Gallery in Barnard Observatory through September 30.

            David Wharton is an assistant professor of Southern Studies and the director of documentary studies at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture. He is the author of four books of photographs: The Soul of a Small Texas Town: Photographs, Memories, and History from McDade, Small Town South, The Power of Belief: Spiritual Landscapes from the Rural South, and Roadside South.

            SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. There are quite a few interesting virtual offerings this semester. Virtual events allow us to connect to larger audiences unable to attend programming in person and allow speakers to participate in the series no matter their location. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events.

            If you require special assistance relating to a disability, please contact Afton Thomas at amthoma4@olemiss.edu or call 662-915-5993.

          • Wed
            07
            Sep
            2022
            5:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

            Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

            "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee (former Uptown Coffee) by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

            No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

            Meeting dates - Fall 2022: August 24; Sept. 7, 21; October. 5, 19; November 2, 16, 30

            For information: ikaufman@olemiss.edu

          • Mon
            12
            Sep
            2022
            4:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

            IDEAS Forum, Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, Advancing through Scholarship

            Location: Zoom, registration required

            This panel will provide important context for understanding the significance of the bold and courageous work of James Meredith to integrate the University of Mississippi and help dismantle systems of white supremacy at our institution and beyond. Perspectives on Meredith and our understanding of how significant social change occurs (now and then) will be provided through a conversation between the current Chairs/Directors of African American Studies, History, and Sociology/Anthropology.

          • Tue
            13
            Sep
            2022
            4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

            Spatial Variation of the Ultrasonic Properties of Brain

            Cecille Labuda
            Department of Physics and Astronomy
            University of Mississippi

            Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

          • Tue
            13
            Sep
            2022
            4:00 pmCoulter Hall 211

            "Choline carboxylic acid based ionic liquids as antimicrobial agents"

          • Wed
            14
            Sep
            2022
            12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

            “Race Land: The Ecology of Segregation”

            Maarten Zwiers

            “Race Land: The Ecology of Segregation” is a global and environmental history of the Jim Crow South during the Cold War era. Segregationists not only exploited (and destroyed) human beings, but also the environment—human and natural resources were systematically mined to uphold the social ecosystem of the South. In this SouthTalk, Maarten Zwiers will discuss the multifaceted and transnational nature of US segregationist thought and practice and the global networks its proponents formed in the years after World War II to sustain their White-supremacist worldview.

            Zwiers is a senior lecturer in contemporary history and American studies at the University of Groningen, the Netherlands. He is the author of Senator James Eastland: Mississippi’s Jim Crow Democrat. He is currently a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Global Fellow at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture.

            SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. There are quite a few interesting virtual offerings this semester. Virtual events allow us to connect to larger audiences unable to attend programming in person and allow speakers to participate in the series no matter their location. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events.

            If you require special assistance relating to a disability, please contact Afton Thomas at amthoma4@olemiss.edu or call 662-915-5993.

          • Wed
            14
            Sep
            2022
            5:00 pmGallery 130, Meek Hall
          • Thu
            15
            Sep
            2022
            10:30 amGallery 130, Meek Hall

            Student Summer Exhibition Awards will be announced!

          • Thu
            15
            Sep
            2022
            6:00 pmBryant Hall 209

            Free Admission

            Explore all of the films in the Hispanic Heritage Film Series

            Sponsored by the Department of Modern Languages, the Croft Institute for International Studies, and the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

          • Mon
            19
            Sep
            2022
            Tue
            04
            Oct
            2022
            Gallery 130, Meek Hall
          • Tue
            20
            Sep
            2022
            4:00 pmCoulter Hall 211

            "Quantum chemical analysis of formation pathways of interstellar molecules"

          • Tue
            20
            Sep
            2022
            4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

            Search for Non-Standard Interactions with Neutrino Oscillations at the NOvA Experiment

            Jeffrey Kleykamp and Luiz Prais
            Department of Physics and Astronomy
            University of Mississippi

            Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

          • Wed
            21
            Sep
            2022
            12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

            I Am from Here: Stories and Recipes from a Southern Chef

            Vishwesh Bhatt and Sara Camp Milam

            Vishwesh Bhatt has been the chef at Snackbar in Oxford since its opening in 2009. A native of Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India, Bhatt is a graduate of the University of Kentucky. He moved to Oxford after college to begin a graduate program in political science but soon abandoned academia for restaurant kitchens. When folks in Mississippi ask him the loaded question, “But where are you really from?” his response is, “I am from here.” That’s the title of Bhatt’s cookbook. Throughout the book Bhatt tells stories of understandings forged over shared meals and explores the common ingredients that connect global cuisines, particularly those of India and the American South.

            Bhatt will be in conversation with Sara Camp Milam, managing editor of the Southern Foodways Alliance. Milam has a BA in Spanish from Princeton University and an MA in folklore from UNC-Chapel Hill.

            SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. There are quite a few interesting virtual offerings this semester. Virtual events allow us to connect to larger audiences unable to attend programming in person and allow speakers to participate in the series no matter their location. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events.

            If you require special assistance relating to a disability, please contact Afton Thomas at amthoma4@olemiss.edu or call 662-915-5993.

          • Wed
            21
            Sep
            2022
            5:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

            Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

            "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee (former Uptown Coffee) by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

            No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

            Meeting dates - Fall 2022: August 24; Sept. 7, 21; October. 5, 19; November 2, 16, 30

            For information: ikaufman@olemiss.edu

          • Thu
            22
            Sep
            2022
            4:00 pmCoulter Hall 211

            "Shortwave infrared emitting BODIPYs"

          • Thu
            22
            Sep
            2022
            6:00 pmBryant Hall 209

            Free Admission

            Explore all of the films in the Hispanic Heritage Film Series

            All films have English subtitles • See the trailers at: SpanishFilmClub.com

            For more information, contact Gabriel Garrido, gagarrid@olemiss.edu

            Sponsored by the Department of Modern Languages, the Croft Institute for International Studies, and the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

          • Tue
            27
            Sep
            2022
            4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

            From Physicist to a Data Scientist: It's Never Too Late!

            Sadia Kaliil
            Senior Data Scientist
            Caterpillar Inc.

            Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

          • Tue
            27
            Sep
            2022
            4:00 pmCoulter Hall 211

            "Automated Generation and Theoretical Predictions for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells"

          • Thu
            29
            Sep
            2022
            12:00 pmJ.D. Williams Library, Faulkner Room

            “Coming Full Circle: My Journey through the University of Mississippi, to Many Points Beyond and Back”

            Dorothye Quaye Chapman Reed

            Author, columnist, academic, businesswoman, and 1974 UM alumna, Dorothye Quaye Chapman Reed said that she was “only three years old when Emmett Till was killed in neighboring Tallahatchie County, I was ten when James Meredith attempted to enroll at the University of Mississippi. Stores in my hometown would not allow us to sit on the stools to enjoy an ice cream cone or have a cold drink. Fortunately, Black men and women in my community taught us how to cope in this environment and strive for equality.”

            As a part of the sixtieth anniversary of integration on the University of Mississippi’s campus, Chapman Reed’s presentation will not only focus on her early life in Water Valley, Mississippi, but her time at the University of Mississippi after its integration.  She will also discuss her work on the “Black Families of Yalobusha County” oral history project with the University’s Center for the Study of Southern Culture.

            The event is hosted by the University of Mississippi Libraries and the Center for the Study of Southern Culture. Following the program all attendees are invited to join a University of Mississippi Slavery Guided Tour by history PhD candidate Don Guillory at 2:00 p.m. Attendees should meet on the steps of the Lyceum (304 University Circle). The tour will last forty-five to sixty minutes.

            SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. There are quite a few interesting virtual offerings this semester. Virtual events allow us to connect to larger audiences unable to attend programming in person and allow speakers to participate in the series no matter their location. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events.

            If you require special assistance relating to a disability, please contact Afton Thomas at amthoma4@olemiss.edu or call 662-915-5993.

          • Thu
            29
            Sep
            2022
            4:00 pm

            For more information, contact 662-915-7020 or philosophy@olemiss.edu

          • Thu
            29
            Sep
            2022
            6:00 pmBryant Hall 209

            Free Admission

            Explore all of the films in the Hispanic Heritage Film Series

            All films have English subtitles • See the trailers at: SpanishFilmClub.com

            For more information, contact Gabriel Garrido, gagarrid@olemiss.edu

            Sponsored by the Department of Modern Languages, the Croft Institute for International Studies, and the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

          • Sun
            02
            Oct
            2022
            7:00 pmKennon Observatory
            We view the Moon, the planets, as well as double stars, though what we can see varies each month, depending on what is visible in the night sky during each scheduled open house.
            The event is free, families are welcome.
            Sponsored by the Department of Physics and Astronomy
          • Mon
            03
            Oct
            2022
            Fri
            18
            Nov
            2022
            8:00AM- 5:00PMFarrington Gallery, Bryant Hall

            The Department of Classics is hosting a traveling photographic and historical exhibit called, “14 Black Classicists”. The exhibit, conceived and curated by Dr. Michele Valerie Ronnick of Wayne State University, reflects on the role of advanced education (and especially of the study of Classics) in building a free and prosperous Black community in the United States. Dr. Ronnick has collected the stories of nineteenth-century Black Americans who chose to pursue advanced education in Greek and Latin language and ancient history, literature and art, and went on to teach in the field. The exhibit is open until November 18th, Monday through Friday, 8 am to 7 pm in the Farrington Gallery on the first floor of Bryant Hall.

            In addition to the exhibit, we will be hosting Dr. Ronnick for a talk on Thursday, November 3 at 5:30 in Bryant 209, with a reception and exhibit event preceding the talk, beginning at 4:00 in Farrington Gallery. Dr. Ronnick will provide “A Brief History of Black Classicism”. Monica Granderson-Little, who teaches in English at Jackson State University, will be delivering preliminary remarks that will help connect Dr. Ronnick’s talk and the exhibit to the broader history of Black education, with a particular focus on the history and the future of JSU.

            Visitor and handicap parking for both events is available on the Lyceum Circle. ADA-compliant access to Bryant Hall is through the Fulton Chapel side door.

            If you have any questions, or if you require a disability related accommodation to fully participate in this event, please contact Molly Pasco-Pranger (mpranger@olemiss.edu or 662-915-7097).

          • Tue
            04
            Oct
            2022
            4:00 pmCoulter Hall 211

            "Development and Validation of Different Analytical Techniques for the Quantification of Cannabinoids and Cannflavins in Cannabis and Cannabis-based Products"

          • Wed
            05
            Oct
            2022
            5:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

            Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

            "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee (former Uptown Coffee) by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

            No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

            Meeting dates - Fall 2022: August 24; Sept. 7, 21; October. 5, 19; November 2, 16, 30

            For information: ikaufman@olemiss.edu

          • Tue
            11
            Oct
            2022
            10AM-1PMUnion Plaza

            Come learn about spring 2023 creative writing classes and participate in fun activities with students and faculty.  

          • Tue
            11
            Oct
            2022
            4:00 pmCoulter Hall 211

            "Studies of Microplastic Pollution in Wastewater Treatment, Airborne Particulate Matter, and Beach Sand, Microplastic Staining with Fluorescent Dyes, and Microplastic-Mercury Affinity"

          • Wed
            12
            Oct
            2022
            12:00 pmVirtual Event

            “Region, Race, and History: Racial Palimpsests in the Southern US”

            Angel Parham

            The racial history of the US is too often defined monolithically in terms of a Black/White color line which has consistently dominated the country. But careful attention to particular regional histories, particularly in the US South with its connections to Latin America and the Caribbean, make clear that there have always been regional nuances that complicate the Black/White dualism often assumed to shape understandings of race across the United States.

            Angel Adams Parham is associate professor of sociology and senior fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture at the University of Virginia. Her research is in the area of historical and comparative-historical sociology of race. She is the author of American Routes: Racial Palimpsests and the Transformation of Race, which examines changes in race and racialization in New Orleans under the French, Spanish, and Anglo-American administrations.

            This event is cosponsored by the envisioned University of Mississippi Center for the Study of Race and Racism.

            SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. There are quite a few interesting virtual offerings this semester. Virtual events allow us to connect to larger audiences unable to attend programming in person and allow speakers to participate in the series no matter their location. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events.

            If you require special assistance relating to a disability, please contact Afton Thomas at amthoma4@olemiss.edu or call 662-915-5993.

          • Thu
            13
            Oct
            2022
            10:30 amGallery 130, Meek Hall
          • Thu
            13
            Oct
            2022
            6:00 pmBryant Hall 209

            Free Admission

            Explore all of the films in the Hispanic Heritage Film Series

            All films have English subtitles • See the trailers at: SpanishFilmClub.com

            For more information, contact Gabriel Garrido, gagarrid@olemiss.edu

            Sponsored by the Department of Modern Languages, the Croft Institute for International Studies, and the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

          • Sun
            16
            Oct
            2022
            6:00 pmThe Grove Stage

            The Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies announces a concert and film screening pop-up on the University of Mississippi campus in partnership with the Center for the Study of Southern Culture and the Southern Documentary Project.

            The event will feature a screening of Christina Huff’s documentary, “Big Clown” followed by a performance of the Memphis-based punk band, Big Clown.

            The energetic show represents a modern connection to this year’s Sarahfest Art Show which focused on the Pensacola punk music scene in the 90s.

            Located on campus at the Grove Stage- 218 Student Union Drive- the concert will begin at 6:00pm. The Tupelo Room in the Barnard Observatory will serve as a back-up location in the event of rain. The event is free and open to the public.

            For more information on Sarahfest and for assistance related to a disability, contact Kevin at (662)915-5916 or email at isomctr@olemiss.edu.

          • Mon
            17
            Oct
            2022
            Fri
            04
            Nov
            2022
            Gallery 130, Meek Hall
          • Mon
            17
            Oct
            2022
            2:00 pmHonors College Kitchen

            Join our time for casual conversation in Spanish.

          • Mon
            17
            Oct
            2022
            5:00 pmBondurant 204C Auditorium

            “The East India Company, Families, and Trade in Global Perspective in the Seventeenth Century”

            With Alison Games, Dorothy M. Brown Distinguished Professor of History at Georgetown University

            For more information or assistance relating to a disability, please contact
            Myra Gilmore at msgilmo1@olemiss.edu or (662) 915-7439

          • Tue
            18
            Oct
            2022
            4:00 pmCoulter Hall 211

            "Electrochemistry and spectroscopy of lanthanides in bistrifluoromethulsulfonyl-amide based ionic liquids"

          • Tue
            18
            Oct
            2022
            6:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

            Dr. Jan Strube, Institute for Fundamental Science at the University of Oregon and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

            The field of particle physics started with the study of charged particles from cosmic radiation that originate high up in the Earth's atmosphere and reach the surface, where they can be detected. Curiosity about these particles led to the development of instruments and facilities that allowed us to produce them in the laboratory and study them in detail. While these experiments increased our understanding of nature, of the cosmological evolution, and of the origin of matter, they kept growing, leading to today's large international collaborations that steward investments of billions of dollars. What are the questions still left unanswered for today's particle physicists? What kind of questions are we looking to answer with the next generation of big science, and what are the facilities proposed to study them? Can we not get the same results with smaller investments? The author will present arguments that big scientific collaborations benefit fundamental physics, applied research, and society and the general public and looks forward to an interesting question and answer session after the presentation.

             

            Available via Zoom

          • Wed
            19
            Oct
            2022
            10AM-1PMUnion Plaza

            Come learn about spring 2023 creative writing classes and participate in fun activities with students and faculty.  

          • Wed
            19
            Oct
            2022
            12:00 pmVirtual Event

            “Race in The Secret Lives of Church Ladies

            Deesha Philyaw and Ethel Scurlock

            Readers and critics alike embraced Deesha Philyaw’s The Secret Lives of Church Ladies, a collection of nine short stories focused on Black women, sex, and the Black church. Yet the collection is rarely discussed as being “about race,” with emphasis placed instead on issues related to gender, sexuality, and religion. In this conversation between Ethel Scurlock and Philyaw, they will explore the significance of race in the book’s stories.

            Philyaw’s short story collection won the 2021 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, the 2020/2021 Story Prize, the 2020 Los Angeles Times’ Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and was a finalist for the 2020 National Book Award for fiction. Philyaw is also a Kimbilio Fiction Fellow and will be the 2022–23 John and Renée Grisham Writer in Residence at the University of Mississippi.

            Scurlock is dean of the University of Mississippi’s Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College, associate professor of English and African American studies, and senior fellow of the Luckyday Residential College. Scurlock became a faculty member at the University of Mississippi in 1996 and has taught honors courses for more than sixteen years. Prior to being named dean, Scurlock was also the director of African American studies.

            SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. There are quite a few interesting virtual offerings this semester. Virtual events allow us to connect to larger audiences unable to attend programming in person and allow speakers to participate in the series no matter their location. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events.

            If you require special assistance relating to a disability, please contact Afton Thomas at amthoma4@olemiss.edu or call 662-915-5993.

          • Thu
            20
            Oct
            2022
            4:00 pm

            For more information, contact 662-915-7020 or philosophy@olemiss.edu

          • Thu
            20
            Oct
            2022
            6:00 pmBryant Hall 209

            Free Admission

            Explore all of the films in the Hispanic Heritage Film Series

            All films have English subtitles • See the trailers at: SpanishFilmClub.com

            For more information, contact Gabriel Garrido, gagarrid@olemiss.edu

            Sponsored by the Department of Modern Languages, the Croft Institute for International Studies, and the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

          • Mon
            24
            Oct
            2022
            2:00 pmHonors College Kitchen

            Join our time for casual conversation in Spanish.

          • Tue
            25
            Oct
            2022
            4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

            Recent Progress Towards the Detection of Dark Matter

            Scott Hertel
            Department of Physics
            University of Massachusetts Amherst

            Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

          • Wed
            26
            Oct
            2022
            5:30 pmDoxey Auditorium, Rust College

            “Slavery and Race in Holly Springs”

            Jodi Skipper, panel moderator

            This panel will be moderated by Jodi Skipper, author of the book Behind the Big House: Reconciling Slavery, Race, and Heritage in the US South, and feature cofounders of the Behind the Big House Program, Chelius Carter and Jenifer Eggleston, Members of Gracing the Table, Rkhty Jones and Wayne Jones, and cofounder of Gracing the Table, Alisea Williams-McLeod. Panelists will discuss the development of the Behind the Big House slave dwelling education program and its impacts and role in telling more inclusive historical narratives in the South.

            This event is cosponsored by Rust College.

            Doxey Auditorium, Rust College

            150 Rust Ave., Holly Springs, MS 38635

            SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. There are quite a few interesting virtual offerings this semester. Virtual events allow us to connect to larger audiences unable to attend programming in person and allow speakers to participate in the series no matter their location. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events.

            If you require special assistance relating to a disability, please contact Afton Thomas at amthoma4@olemiss.edu or call 662-915-5993.

          • Thu
            27
            Oct
            2022
            6:00 pmBryant Hall 209

            Free Admission

            Explore all of the films in the Hispanic Heritage Film Series

            All films have English subtitles • See the trailers at: SpanishFilmClub.com

            For more information, contact Gabriel Garrido, gagarrid@olemiss.edu

            Sponsored by the Department of Modern Languages, the Croft Institute for International Studies, and the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

          • Fri
            28
            Oct
            2022
            3:00 pmBondurant 204C Auditorium

            Come enjoy food, trivia, a special presentation, and breakout conversations to learn more about Modern Languages and the programs that they offer!

          • Fri
            28
            Oct
            2022
            6:00 pmLewis Hall

            The annual Halloween-themed open house at the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

            Bring your kids and friends to learn about energy, electricity, magnetism, sound and waves, the physics of ultracold temperatures and more. But beware! Expect a hair-raising experience -- literally: we'll shoot enough electricity through your body to make your hair stand up -- and other ‘nefarious’ experiments involving a bed of nails, lasers, superconductors and electromagnets. All harmless activities, of course! The night will also include food and fun, a Halloween costume contest for children, and liquid nitrogen ice cream for everybody, ‘freshly’ made at -320 F degrees.

            Demo shows full of fun and excitement will be held at 6:15 and 7:30 pm in Lewis Hall 101 and 109. Additional demos will be presented by students, staff, and faculty throughout the evening in and outside of Lewis Hall.

            Spooky Physics Night visitors may park in the University Circle, surrounding areas alongside or behind Turner Complex and the Intensive English building (just west of Turner), in the Pavilion garage or in the Tad Smith coliseum parking lot.

            For assistance related to a disability, contact Jake Bennett: jvbennet@olemiss.edu 

          • Sun
            30
            Oct
            2022
            6:30 pmKennon Observatory
            We view the Moon, the planets, as well as double stars, though what we can see varies each month, depending on what is visible in the night sky during each scheduled open house.
            The event is free, families are welcome.
            Sponsored by the Department of Physics and Astronomy
          • Mon
            31
            Oct
            2022
            2:00 pmHonors College Kitchen

            Join our time for casual conversation in Spanish.

          • Tue
            01
            Nov
            2022
            12:15 pmFarrington Gallery, Bryant Hall

            Brown Bag: Informal discussions and current 'religion in the news' stories and items

            First Tuesdays luncheon will be held throughout the semester. Each meeting will discuss a current religion in the news story; themes and readings will be posted within a week of the luncheons.

            For assistance related to a disability, contact Mary Thurlkill: maryt@olemiss.edu 

          • Tue
            01
            Nov
            2022
            4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

            Jan Strube
            Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate
            Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

            Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

          • Tue
            01
            Nov
            2022
            5:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

            "Vote with Your Feet: James Meredith, William Melvin Kelley, and Henry David Thoreau"

            Kinohi Nishikawa, Associate Professor of English and African American Studies, Princeton University delivers the 2021-2022 Baine Lecture.

            Inspired by UM’s 60th anniversary of integration, the talk will be on Black experimental novelist William Melvin Kelley’s debut A Different Drummer, which came out in 1962 and offers a fascinating contemporary view of integration in the Deep South.

            Co-sponsored by UM Libraries

          • Tue
            01
            Nov
            2022
            6:30 pmOxford Skate Park

            “Skating South: Oral Histories and Music”

            Southern Studies students enrolled in SST 533 will present their work, which includes oral histories and videos that document the skateboarding community in Mississippi. The presentation will be followed by a performance from the punk band School Drugs.

            Oxford Skate Park

            400 Bramlett Blvd., across from the Oxford-Lafayette Public Library

            SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. There are quite a few interesting virtual offerings this semester. Virtual events allow us to connect to larger audiences unable to attend programming in person and allow speakers to participate in the series no matter their location. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events.

            If you require special assistance relating to a disability, please contact Afton Thomas at amthoma4@olemiss.edu or call 662-915-5993.

          • Wed
            02
            Nov
            2022
            12:00 pmVirtual Event

            “Humanists as Activists: Exploring Our Social Responsibility as Writers”

            Clinnesha D. Sibley

            This interactive SouthTalk will allow participants to explore characters and dramatic situations that reflect injustices in our current world. In the spirit of social change, urgency, and activism, participants will be able to create and discuss original literature that encourages radical empathy, activates the human heart, and holds the writer accountable.

            Clinnesha D. Sibley is the author of plays, blogs, poetry, prose, essays, and creative nonfiction. Her work contributes authentic narratives about Mississippians, southerners, and Black women to the contemporary literary canon and has been recognized by Penumbra Theatre, Eugene O’Neill Theatre Center, Kentucky Women Writers Conference, Fade to Black Reading Series, and the New Stage Theatre, among others.

            SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. There are quite a few interesting virtual offerings this semester. Virtual events allow us to connect to larger audiences unable to attend programming in person and allow speakers to participate in the series no matter their location. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events.

            If you require special assistance relating to a disability, please contact Afton Thomas at amthoma4@olemiss.edu or call 662-915-5993.

          • Wed
            02
            Nov
            2022
            4:00 pmGertrude C. Ford Student Union Auditorium (Room 124)

            bring your bars.. your lines.. your caesuras.. your virgules.. your skin.. your bones

            Featuring Derrick Harriell

            Interim Director of African American Studies
            Ottilie Schillig Associate Professor
            English and African American Studies

            Acclaimed poet Derrick Harriell will read selections from his new book Come Kingdom. A question and answer period and book signing will follow the poetry reading session.


            Sponsored by The College of Liberal Arts
            For Additional information Contact ideasforum@olemiss.edu or 662.915.2784.

            For questions about accessibility or to request accommodations, please contact the College of Liberal Arts by calling or emailing Valeria Ross at 662.915.2784 or vross@olemiss.edu. Thank you for submitting these request(s) as soon as possible.

          • Thu
            03
            Nov
            2022
            Sat
            05
            Nov
            2022
            The Inn at Ole Miss

            We are pleased to invite you to the 89th Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Section of the American Physical Society (SESAPS). SESAPS 2022 will be held November 3-5, 2022 at The Inn at Ole Miss on the University of Mississippi campus. Established in 1937, SESAPS exists for the advancement and diffusion of knowledge of physics within the southeastern region of the United States, including the states of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia; the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico; and the US Virgin Islands. We especially encourage undergraduate and graduate students to attend and submit abstracts for oral and/or poster presentations. Limited travel support is available for students. We will also have numerous exciting special sessions, including a session to promote discussion on diversity issues in physics.

            SESAPS 2022 will include sessions covering a broad range of current topics in physics research, a student poster session, a graduate program fair, and the presentation of the annual SESAPS awards in teaching (Pegram), research (Beams), and service (Slack). Undergraduate students will have the chance to compete for prizes for best oral and poster presentations. The meeting banquet will feature a keynote address aimed towards a general audience.

            Please reach out to the SESAPS 2022 local organizing committee at sesaps22@phy.olemiss.edu if you have any questions about the meeting.

            Please visit the SESAPS 2022 website for more information and see the SESAPS Program for a full list of events. 

             

          • Thu
            03
            Nov
            2022
            10:30 amGallery 130, Meek Hall
          • Thu
            03
            Nov
            2022
            4:00 pm

            For more information, contact 662-915-7020 or philosophy@olemiss.edu

          • Thu
            03
            Nov
            2022
            6:00 pmBryant Hall 209

            Free Admission

            Explore all of the films in the Hispanic Heritage Film Series

            All films have English subtitles • See the trailers at: SpanishFilmClub.com

            For more information, contact Gabriel Garrido, gagarrid@olemiss.edu

            Sponsored by the Department of Modern Languages, the Croft Institute for International Studies, and the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

          • Mon
            07
            Nov
            2022
            2:00 pmHonors College Kitchen

            Join our time for casual conversation in Spanish.

          • Thu
            10
            Nov
            2022
            6:00 pmBryant Hall 209

            Free Admission

            Explore all of the films in the Hispanic Heritage Film Series

            All films have English subtitles • See the trailers at: SpanishFilmClub.com

            For more information, contact Gabriel Garrido, gagarrid@olemiss.edu

            Sponsored by the Department of Modern Languages, the Croft Institute for International Studies, and the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

          • Mon
            14
            Nov
            2022
            Fri
            18
            Nov
            2022
            Gallery 130, Meek Hall
          • Mon
            14
            Nov
            2022
            2:00 pmHonors College Kitchen

            Join our time for casual conversation in Spanish.

          • Tue
            15
            Nov
            2022
            4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

            The First Stars, Black Holes, and Galaxies in the Universe

            John Wise
            Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics
            Georgia Institute of Technology

            Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

             

          • Thu
            17
            Nov
            2022
            10:30 amGallery 130, Meek Hall
          • Sun
            27
            Nov
            2022
            5:15 pmKennon Observatory
            We view the Moon, the planets, as well as double stars, though what we can see varies each month, depending on what is visible in the night sky during each scheduled open house.
            The event is free, families are welcome.
            Sponsored by the Department of Physics and Astronomy
          • Mon
            28
            Nov
            2022
            2:00 pmHonors College Kitchen

            Join our time for casual conversation in Spanish.

          • Tue
            29
            Nov
            2022
            4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

            Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

            Fernanda Psihas
            Neutrino Division
            Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

          • Fri
            02
            Dec
            2022
            6:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room and Gammill Gallery

            The Fall Documentary Showcase is a celebration of the work by our documentary students. Each artist will present their work, followed by a Q&A session.

            SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. There are quite a few interesting virtual offerings this semester. Virtual events allow us to connect to larger audiences unable to attend programming in person and allow speakers to participate in the series no matter their location. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events.

            If you require special assistance relating to a disability, please contact Afton Thomas at amthoma4@olemiss.edu or call 662-915-5993.

          • Thu
            19
            Jan
            2023
            Tue
            31
            Jan
            2023
            J.D. Williams Library

            Eleven University of Mississippi graduate students have curated an exhibition of LGBTQ+ Mississippi materials as a part of a multidisciplinary study on the history of the queer South.

            Amy McDowell, associate professor of sociology, and Eva Payne, assistant professor of history, are leading the cross-listed course Queer Mississippi, in which students study and exhibit evidence of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer communities in the state.

            Read more about this exhibition. 

          • Tue
            24
            Jan
            2023
            4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

            Tiffany Lewis:  Building Blocks for Blazars
            Astroparticle Physics Lab
            Goddard Space Flight Center

            Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

          • Wed
            25
            Jan
            2023
            12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

            “Seeing the Unseen” presented by Michael Fagans    

            Too often we walk past things without seeing them for what they are or what they could be. Expanding how we think about images allows us to see the world in a different and broader way. This SouthTalk is an expansion of Fagans’s University of Mississippi TEDx talk, allowing for interaction and conversation with attendees.

            Michael Fagans is a photojournalist, author, and documentary filmmaker and an assistant professor at the School of Journalism and New Media. Fagans enjoys telling people’s stories, and his journey has taken him to the Navajo Nation, Malawi, India, Austria, Afghanistan, Scotland, Canada, the Dominican Republic, Belize, Guatemala, and now Mississippi.

          • Wed
            25
            Jan
            2023
            12:00 pmJohnson Commons Room 212E

            Is student success in human anatomy and physiology impossible, or is it the result of old-school, hard work? 

            Facilitator: Dr. Carol Britson, Instructional Professor of Biology

            Join Dr. Carol Britson from the Department of Biology as she presents the impacts of course design best-practices, student preparation, and the COVID-19 pandemic on student performance in one of the most life-changing courses students may take in college.

            Registration required.

            For assistance related to a disability, contact Melissa Wilson: mwilson@olemiss.edu | 662-915-1391

             

          • Wed
            25
            Jan
            2023
            5:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

            Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

            "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

            No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

            For assistance related to a disability, contact Irene Kaufmann Cotelo: ikaufman@olemiss.edu 

             

          • Thu
            26
            Jan
            2023
            4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

            Giacomo Fragione
            Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics
            Northwestern University

            Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

          • Sun
            29
            Jan
            2023
            5:45PM-7:00PMKennon Observatory

            We offer astronomy open houses that are centered around viewings with our telescopes. We view the Moon, the planets, as well as double stars, though what we can see varies each month, depending on what is visible in the night sky during each scheduled open house. We are also planning to schedule additional astronomy themed presentations.

            All these events are weather permitting; however, our additional presentations will be available in case of poor weather conditions.

            Admission is free. Children are welcome!

          • Wed
            01
            Feb
            2023
            12:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

            Blackout: The Continuing Assault against Black Bodies” a virtual SouthTalk presented by Barbara Harris Combs

            Blackness in a society built largely on anti-Black sentiments simultaneously renders Black bodies both a heightened sense of visibility and invisibility in society. In this talk, Combs shares insights from her new book, Bodies out of Place: Theorizing Anti-Blackness in U.S. Society, which examines practices of racial entrenchment as they have manifested in post-Obama expressions of anti-Blackness in discursive, legal, interactional, and extralegal contexts. Combs examines recent incidents of everyday racism against Black persons (the killing of Ahmaud Arbery, the Central Park birding incident, various cases on college campuses, among others) to arrive at a theorization of what expectations about bodies, space, and belonging tell us about the way racism is perpetuated in US society.

            Barbara Harris Combs is professor of sociology and chair of the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice at Kennesaw State University. Combs is also the author of From Selma to Montgomery: The Long March to Freedom. Her forthcoming book, Black Places and Spaces of Political Empowerment, with coauthors Todd C. Shaw and Kirk Foster, is under contract with Oxford University Press.

            Preregister for this SouthTalk.

          • Wed
            01
            Feb
            2023
            5:30 pmCenter for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

            Do you identify as bi-racial, multi-racial, multi-ethnic, mixed? Join us on February 1 in the CICCE to meet other bi-racial, multi-racial, multi-ethnic, mixed students at the University, build community, and discuss future opportunities.
            Please use this RSVP form to let us know if you can join us.

            Sponsored by the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

          • Thu
            02
            Feb
            2023
            4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

            Michael Fausnaugh
            Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research
            Massachusetts Institute for Technology

            Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

          • Sat
            04
            Feb
            2023
            10AM-12PMUniversity Museum

            Black History Month Series: A look into southern Black people’s rich tradition of Folk Art. Art of the people, for the people, and by the people! Folk Art is made by artists whose creative skills tell tales about their community’s authentic cultural identity. Everyone in the family, adults and children, will embrace their inner Folk Artist and create artwork using non-traditional materials and expressive subject matters. Venture into the Museum to learn and make art inspired by fabulous folk artists like Clementine Hunter, Luster Willis, M.B. Mayfield, LV Hull, and more. Free, open to all ages, pre-registration is not required, free refreshments.

            Sponsored by the University Museum and Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

          • Tue
            07
            Feb
            2023
            4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

            Nicholas MacDonald
            Radio Astronomy/VLBI Group
            Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy

            Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

          • Tue
            07
            Feb
            2023
            4:30 pmFulton Chapel

            "What Poets can do" featuring U.S. Poet Laureate Ada Limón

            Ada Limón is the author of six books of poetry, including The Carrying, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry. Limón was also the host of the critically-acclaimed poetry podcast, The Slowdown. Her new book of poetry, The Hurting Kind, is out now from Milkweed Editions. She is the 24th Poet Laureate of The United States.

            Lecture at 5:30 p.m.
            Book signing before and after the event, starting at 4:30 p.m.
            Books will be available for purchase.
            Please wear a mask to this event.

            For more information or assistance relating to a disability, please contact Myra Gilmore, engl@olemiss.edu or 662.915.7439.

          • Wed
            08
            Feb
            2023
            10:00AM-2:00PMGertrude C. Ford Student Union Ballroom

            Do you want to study abroad? Come visit the Study Abroad Fair in the Student Union Ballroom! There will be representatives from various UM Study Abroad partners to speak with you about all of the opportunities related to studying abroad with Ole Miss! Study Abroad programs are offered throughout all terms including summer, intersessions, semesters, and academic year – all for academic credit! Come meet to discuss and learn about how studying abroad can fit into your degree! We are open to all majors on campus!

            Sponsored by the Study Abroad Office

          • Wed
            08
            Feb
            2023
            12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

            “I Don’t Wanna Say the Wrong Thing! How to Reconcile with Race in the Classroom” presented by  Frederick Gooding Jr.

            Discussing topics centering around race can often be awkward and uncomfortable—but it doesn’t always have to be! Uncover and discover how we are closer to racial reconciliation than we think by learning the three key steps we can take inside of our classrooms. This session will persuade attendees to reflect upon their campus practices and consider additional ways in which they can provide welcoming and culturally relevant institutionalized experiences for both their current and future students.

            Frederick Gooding Jr. is an associate history professor and the Dr. Ronald E. Moore Endowed Professor of the Humanities at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, Texas. Featured in national publications such as the New York Times and USA Today, Gooding critically analyzes images within mainstream culture and engages audiences on racial patterns hidden in plain sight. “Dr. G,” as he is affectionately known, has also provided social commentary on CBS, NBC, and Fox News networks, and served as inaugural Chair of TCU’s Race & Reconciliation Initiative.

            Preregister for this SouthTalk.

          • Wed
            08
            Feb
            2023
            4:00 pmGertrude C. Ford Ole Miss Student Union – Room 326

            Join The Center for Inclusion & Cross Cultural Engagement & VIP: Survivor Support Services for a Healthy Relationships Workshop on February 8th, from 4-5p.m in the Student Union room 326. This workshop will allow participants to exploring personal boundaries, practice communication creating personalized communication toolbox, identify green, gray and red flags exploring healthy and unhealthy relationship characteristics. Participants will be invited to engage in individual reflection, small group and large group discussion across different topics throughout the workshop.

            Please feel free to reach out to VIP Program Manager, Christin Dobbs at : cdobbs@olemiss.edu for further information or questions regarding the workshop.

            Registration Required: Registration Form

            Sponsored by VIP: Survivor Support Services & Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

          • Wed
            08
            Feb
            2023
            5:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

            Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

            "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

            No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

            For assistance related to a disability, contact Irene Kaufmann Cotelo: ikaufman@olemiss.edu 

             

          • Thu
            09
            Feb
            2023
            4:00 pmCoulter Hall 211

            featuring Professor Andrew Wilson (Louisville)

          • Thu
            09
            Feb
            2023
            4:00 pmCoulter Hall 211

            Featuring Professor Andrew Wilson (Louisville)

          • Thu
            09
            Feb
            2023
            5:30 pmOverby Center Auditorium

            In 1887 two formerly enslaved cousins bought 840 acres of swampland in the Mississippi Delta. Benjamin T. Green and Isaiah T. Montgomery used the site to found Mound Bayou, which went on to prosper as the largest and most self-sufficient all-Black town in the United States. Promised Land: A Story about Mound Bayou “not only tells the history of Mound Bayou, it celebrates the achievements of its residents and contributes to the conversation about its future,” said Claire Winn, director of programs for the Mississippi Heritage Trust, which funded the project alongside the National Park Service and others.

            A discussion and Q&A will follow the film screening. Castel Sweet, director of UM Center for Community Engagement, will moderate the discussion, and W. Ralph Eubanks, the Black Power at Ole Miss Faculty Fellow at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, will provide opening remarks. Sweet and Eubanks are joined by Mound Bayou-natives and community leaders, Hermon Johnson Jr., Darryl Johnson, and Hermon Johnson Sr.

            Hermon Johnson Jr. is a Mound Bayou native. To support the revitalization of Mound Bayou and the Mississippi Delta area, he cofounded the Mound Bayou Movement nonprofit with his brother, Darryl Johnson, and his father, Hermon Johnson Sr. Hermon is now the executive director of the Mound Bayou Museum of African American Culture and History.

            Darryl Johnson is the founding pastor of the Walk of Faith Covenant Church. He is a former mayor of Mound Bayou, one of five founders of Historic Black Towns and Settlements Alliance, and vice president of World Conference of Mayors.

            Hermon Johnson Sr. is referred to by many as “the man behind the scenes.” After graduating from Southern A&M College and serving in the military, he moved to Mound Bayou, where he originally worked as a field officer for the Magnolia Mutual Life Insurance Company under Dr. T. R. M. Howard, replacing Medgar Evers. Hermon is former vice mayor of Mound Bayou and cofounder and former president of Delta Housing and Development Corporation.

            This event is cosponsored by the Center for the Study of Southern Culture and the Center for Community Engagement.

            o

             

          • Tue
            14
            Feb
            2023
            4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

            Ayush Dhital, Aniket Khairnar : Student Research Presentations
            Department of Physics and Astronomy
            University of Mississippi

            Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

          • Wed
            15
            Feb
            2023
            12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

            Koji Motomura, who is currently working on the translation of Eudora Welty’s Delta Wedding into Japanese, will take up various issues surrounding his translation and discuss them with Annette Trefzer. His topics include the overall reception of Welty’s oeuvre in Japan, the Japanese translations of Welty’s major works, a comparison between the two existing Japanese translations of Delta Wedding, and the difficulties and problems of translating Delta Wedding.

            Koji Motomura is a professor of English at Komazawa University in Tokyo, Japan. He has written twenty-one articles on American literature and published five literary reviews in journals or magazines in Japan. He is the author of sixteen books in Japanese: fifteen books were written jointly with other scholars, and one book, The Dialogue between Texts: A Reading of William Faulkner and Eudora Welty, is single-authored.

            Annette Trefzer is a professor of English at the University of Mississippi. She is the author of Exposing Mississippi: Eudora Welty’s Photographic Reflections and Disturbing Indians: The Archaeology of Southern Fiction. She is coeditor of five volumes in the Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Series published by the University of Mississippi Press.

             

          • Wed
            15
            Feb
            2023
            5:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

            Art Talks with Ellen Lupton – typographer, graphic designer, author, and Curator at the Cooper-Hewitt/Smithsonian Design Museum.
            Register for Ellen Lupton's talk

          • Wed
            15
            Feb
            2023
            5:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

            Art Talks with Ellen Lupton: typographer, graphic designer, author, and Curator at the Cooper-Hewitt/Smithsonian Design Museum.

            Preregister for this Art Talks

          • Thu
            16
            Feb
            2023
            1:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

            “Vietnamese, Cubans, and Mexicans in the South: An Intertwined History”  a virtual SouthTalk presented by Perla M. Guerrero

            How are the histories of Vietnamese, Cubans, and Mexicans in the South articulated through national policies but defined through regional specificities? Perla M. Guerrero’s talk will focus on the Asian and Latinx communities in Arkansas in the last quarter of the twentieth century to explore placemaking. Guerrero argues that to fully understand the experiences of Asians and Latinxs in the South, we must also understand the history of place-specific ideologies that are at the center of more recent instantiations of racialized relationships.

            Guerrero is associate professor of American studies and US Latina/o Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. Her research and teaching interests include relational race and ethnicity with a focus on Latinxs and Asian Americans, space and place, immigration and legality, labor, and US history. She has received multiple awards, including a Ford Postdoctoral Fellowship and two fellowships from the Smithsonian Institution. She is working on her second book about deportation and coerced return to Mexico.

            Preregister for this SouthTalk.

            This event is cosponsored by the University of Mississippi Center for the Study of Race and Racism.

             

          • Thu
            16
            Feb
            2023
            3:00 pmGertrude C. Ford Ole Miss Student Union – Room 326

            Documentary Screening with a discussion to follow with the Black History Month Keynote speaker and director of the film, Dr. Judy Meredith

            Sponsored by the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

          • Thu
            16
            Feb
            2023
            4:00 pmLGBTQIA+ Lounge, Lamar Hall 4th Floor

            Presented by LaToya Faulk, MFA (Writing and Rhetoric).

            Feminine hygiene is a billion-dollar industry and women of color are the largest consumers of feminine hygiene products. Studies link excessive use of feminine hygiene products to harmful endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that cause cancer.

            Earlier last year, I learned of Jacqueline Fox, an Alabama woman who died in 2016 of an ovarian cancer linked to talcum use, and I discovered there were countless other women like her.  Reports show Johnson & Johnson both knew about the link between talcum and ovarian cancer yet marketed the product to Black and Hispanic women after learning that using baby powder was a vaginal hygiene practice used widely among girls and women in Black and Hispanic communities. In researching hygiene rituals, the expression “fresh and clean” showed up repeatedly when Black women shared feelings that came with their use of tampons, powders, soaps, sprays, douches, wipes, lotions, suppositories, napkins, and creams guaranteed to tame the odorous, fluid draining, and menstruating vagina. The idiom “fresh and clean” isn’t just about the importance and continuous presentation of a newly washed female body, though corporations widely use the phrase in this way. Religious conviction, sexism, and racism are corollaries of the frequent use of harmful, unregulated hygiene products.

            I see fiction as a powerful tool for calling into question and reimagining engrained rituals and widely held ideas. We shape the stories we tell, but stories also shape us.  In telling the story of two sisters who struggle with ideas of moral uprightness and obsessive feminine cleanliness, the novel FRESH AND CLEAN interrogates the surveillance of Black female bodies and the ways cleanliness instigates ideas about a woman’s worthiness. I also want readers to consider the deadly consequences of our current consumer culture and how easily we place trust in feminine hygiene products simply because they’re on the shelf.

            About: LaToya Faulk is a recent fiction graduate of the University of Mississippi’s MFA program and a First-Year Writing instructor in The Department of Writing and Rhetoric.  Her work has been published in Scalawag, Southwest Review, Amherst College’s The Common, and Splinter Magazine’s Think Local series. She received a 2022 Pushcart special mention for the essay “In Search of Homeplace,” and she has a forthcoming essay soon to be published in The Global South called “Love is Wanting you Alive.” She lives with her two children in Oxford, Mississippi.

          • Thu
            16
            Feb
            2023
            6:00 pmGertrude C. Ford Student Union Ballroom

            Join us for the Black History Month Keynote featuring Dr. Judy Meredith. As we continue celebrating the legacy of James Meredith and the 60th Anniversary of Integration at the University of Mississippi, Dr. Judy Meredith will share remarks, “The Mystic, The Man: Who is James Meredith?.” The Lift Every Voice award will be presented at the keynote and a reception will follow the keynote.

            Sponsored by the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

          • Fri
            17
            Feb
            2023
            6:00 pmThe Inn at Ole Miss

            Sponsored by the Black Student Union

          • Fri
            17
            Feb
            2023
            Sun
            26
            Feb
            2023
            7:30 pmMeek Auditorium

            Written by Naomi Iizuka
            Directed by Beth Reeves
            February 17 – 18; Feburary 21 – 25 @ 7:30pm
            February 18 – 19; February 25 – 26 @ 2:00pm
            Meek Auditorium

            A visceral blend of classical mythology and real life stories told by street kids, Naomi lizuka's Polaroid Stories journeys into a dangerous world where myth-making fulfills a fierce need for transcendence, where storytelling has the power to transform a reality in which characters' lives are continually threatened, devalued and effaced. Not all the stories these characters tell are true; some are lies, wild yams, clever deceits, baroque fabrications. But whether or not a homeless kid invents an incredible history for himself isn't the point, explains diarist-of-the-street Jim Grimsley. "All these stories and lies add up to something like the truth." Inspired in part by Ovid's Metamorphoses, Iizuka's Polaroid Stories takes place on an abandoned pier on the outermost edge of a city, a way stop for dreamers, dealers and desperadoes, a no-man's land where runaways seek camaraderie, refuge and escape. Serpentine routes from the street to the heart characterize the interactions in this spellbinding tale of young people pushed to society's fringe. Informed, as well, by interviews with young prostitutes and street kids, Polaroid Stories conveys a whirlwind of psychic disturbance, confusion and longing. Like their mythic counterparts, these modem-day mortals are engulfed by needs that burn and consume. Their language mixes poetry and profanity, imbuing the play with lyricism and great theatrical force.

             

          • Mon
            20
            Feb
            2023
            6:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

            "The Mentor as Cartographer:  Seeing Harold Fisk’s Meander Maps as Metaphor" by Beth Spencer, Senior Lecturer in English and 2023 University of Mississippi Humanities Council Teacher of the Year

            A reception will follow the lecture.

          • Tue
            21
            Feb
            2023
            4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

            Akshay Khadse, Purnima Narayan: Student Research Presentations
            Department of Physics and Astronomy
            University of Mississippi

            Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

          • Wed
            22
            Feb
            2023
            12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

            “Reconciliation: The University and the History of the Ole Miss 89″ presented by Ralph Eubanks and Amirhea Bishop

            On the evening of February 25, 1970, during a performance of the clean-cut and upbeat traveling musical ensemble Up with People, members of the Black Student Union (BSU) engaged in a peaceful protest to get the university to listen to their demands, which included a Black studies program, Black professors and administrators, and scholarships to attract more Black students. Eighty-nine students were arrested that evening and eventually eight of those eighty-nine were expelled. At the time, none of them yet knew they were under surveillance by the FBI and the university.

            W. Ralph Eubanks and Amirhea Bishop will discuss the ways they are seeking to collect and preserve the oral histories of the “Ole Miss 89” and the ways their work is seeking to give the 1970 “Up with People protest” the place it deserves in the history and memory of activism at the University of Mississippi. Ralph Eubanks is the Black Power at Ole Miss Faculty Fellow at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture. A writer and essayist whose work focuses on race, identity, and the American South, his most recent book is A Place Like MississippiA Journey through a Real and Imagined Literary Landscape. 

            Amirhea Bishop is a native of Madison, Mississippi. She is an alumna of Jackson State University and is a first-year MA student in the Center’s Southern Studies program. Amirhea serves as Eubanks’s research assistant for the Black Power at Ole Miss Task Force committee, which documents the stories and preserves the legacy of the Ole Miss 89 through oral histories.

             

          • Wed
            22
            Feb
            2023
            5:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

            Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

            "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

            No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

            For assistance related to a disability, contact Irene Kaufmann Cotelo: ikaufman@olemiss.edu 

             

          • Wed
            22
            Feb
            2023
            5:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

            Gallery Walk: “Within the Bittersweet” with Allison Grant

            Within the Bittersweet is a dark, pastoral narrative about raising children amid concerns about the impacts of climate change and environmental contamination. All the photographs in the exhibition were taken in and around Grant’s home in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, where dense vegetation and natural beauty intersect with industrial and fossil-fuel facilities that dot the region. These industries spread noxious particulates and hazardous toxins across the terrain and into the air, water, and our bodies.

            In Grant’s artwork, the dark realities of the landscape we live in are interlaced with representations of her deep love for her children and the physical world around them—a living tapestry of incredible complexity that her daughters are just coming to know. The climate crisis will undoubtedly reshape the world they inherit, and through these photographs Grant negotiates the beauty and heartbreak of raising them on a wondrous planet amid such rapid and impactful change.

            Allison Grant is an artist, writer, curator, and assistant professor of photography at the University of Alabama. Her artworks have been widely exhibited. She holds an MFA from Columbia College Chicago and BFA from the Columbus College of Art and Design.

          • Sun
            26
            Feb
            2023
            6:15PM-7:30PMKennon Observatory

            We offer astronomy open houses that are centered around viewings with our telescopes. We view the Moon, the planets, as well as double stars, though what we can see varies each month, depending on what is visible in the night sky during each scheduled open house. We are also planning to schedule additional astronomy themed presentations.

            All these events are weather permitting; however, our additional presentations will be available in case of poor weather conditions.

            Admission is free. Children are welcome!

          • Tue
            28
            Feb
            2023
            4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

            Woodrow Shew: Brain on the edge: phase transitions and criticality in cerebral cortex
            Department of Physics
            University of Arkansas

            Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

          • Wed
            01
            Mar
            2023
            12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

            Join documentary editor Sarah Garrahan as she talks about strategies for editing documentary feature films, including working with a team, how not to get overwhelmed, and practical skills that help get films to the finish line.

            Sarah Garrahan is a documentary producer and editor from San Antonio, Texas. She is based in Los Angeles, California. She co-produced and was an additional editor on the hybrid documentary The Infiltrators by Cristina Ibarra and Alex Rivera, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 2019 and was awarded the NEXT Audience and Innovator Awards. She edited the Emmy-nominated feature documentary Building the American Dream by Chelsea Hernandez, which premiered at SXSW in 2019 and was broadcast nationally on PBS. She edited the short documentary Status Pending by Priscilla González Sainz, which was supported by IF/Then Shorts and acquired by Al Jazeera. She edited the feature documentary Silent Beauty by Jasmin López, which premiered at the 2022 Hot Docs Film Festival. She holds an MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts from Duke University. She is a former Flaherty Fellow and Felsman Fellow.

          • Wed
            01
            Mar
            2023
            5:30 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105 and on Zoom (preregister with the link below)

            An African American Dilemma: A History of School Integration and Civil Rights in the North presented by Zoë Burkholder

            Since Brown v. Board of Education in 1954, Americans have viewed school integration as a central tenet of the Black civil rights movement. Yet, school integration was not the only—or even always the dominant—civil rights strategy. At times, African Americans also fought for separate, Black-controlled schools dedicated to racial uplift and community empowerment.

            To date, much of what we know about the history of school integration comes from the South. In her book An African American Dilemma: A History of School Integration and Civil Rights in the North, Burkholder offers the first and most comprehensive analysis of the history of Black struggles for educational equality in the North. She argues that since the 1840s, African Americans have employed multiple strategies to fight for equal educational opportunities, including school integration and its opposite—separate, Black-controlled schools. This study considers what is unique about Black struggles for school integration in the North, how these struggles differed from those in the South, and why these regional distinctions matter in shedding light on the complex relationship between school integration and the larger Black freedom struggle.

            Zoë Burkholder is an historian of education, professor of educational foundations, and the founding director of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Human Rights Education Project at Montclair State University.

            This event will also be available for virtual attendance. Register for the webinar.

          • Thu
            02
            Mar
            2023
            4:00 pm

            For more information, contact 662-915-7020 or philosophy@olemiss.edu

          • Thu
            02
            Mar
            2023
            5:00 pmGertrude C. Ford Ole Miss Student Union – Room 323

            We probably all know the unfortunate statistic that women spend nearly twice as much time on housework and childcare as their male counterparts. But more shocking than that calculation is the reality that that is in fact an underestimate of the true gender gap. Allison Daminger introduces us to the idea of cognitive labor, a form of work akin to project management, and demonstrates that this invisible burden falls disproportionately on women. In the pages of both glossy magazines and sober academic journals, household contributions are primarily measured in minutes and documented through time-use diaries. But Daminger argues that we must consider mind-use alongside time-use; the work of constantly anticipating children’s needs, for example, cannot be adequately captured on a time diary. Yet such cognitive labor is a ubiquitous feature of family life, and it represents a burden disproportionately borne by women in different-gender couples—even when those couples aspire to equality.

            Daminger provides new language and conceptual tools to explain why even in egalitarian partnerships, inequality is likely to be explained away or covered up by talk of ‘personality types’. She will also show how cognitive labor inequality emerges in the first place and what forces sustain it.

            Sponsored by the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement, College of Liberal Arts, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies

          • Tue
            07
            Mar
            2023
            12:00 pmGertrude C. Ford Student Union Ballroom

            The University of Mississippi Career Center invites you to participate in the Spring 2023 All Majors Career Expo and Internship Fair. The event is open to all students and all majors! Both internship and full-time job opportunities will be available. Please bring copies of your resume and meet potential employers. PROFESSIONAL DRESS REQUIRED.

            Questions about the career fair? Contact the Career Center at 662-915-7174. Remember we are available to guide you to the right career!

            Sponsored by the Career Center

          • Tue
            07
            Mar
            2023
            4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

            Alexey Petrov
            Department of Physics and Astronomy
            University of South Carolina

            Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

          • Wed
            08
            Mar
            2023
            11:00 amGertrude C. Ford Student Union Ballroom

            The University of Mississippi Career Center invites you to participate in the Spring 2023 STEM Fair. The event is open to all students classifications. Both internship/co-op and full-time job opportunities will be available. Please bring copies of your resume and meet potential employers. PROFESSIONAL DRESS REQUIRED.

            Questions about the career fair? Contact the Career Center at 662-915-7174. Remember we are available to guide you to the right career!

            Sponsored by the Career Center

          • Wed
            08
            Mar
            2023
            12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105 and on Zoom (preregister with the link below)

            What Has Been Will Be Again: Place, Time, and the Politics of Remembrance presented by Jared Ragland

            In a moment of pandemic, protest, and polarization, photographer Jared Ragland has journeyed across more than twenty-five thousand miles and into each of Alabama’s sixty-seven counties to survey his home state’s cultural and physical landscape. By tracing the Trail of Tears, the Old Federal Road, and Hernando de Soto’s 1540 expedition route, What Has Been Will Be Again contends with Alabama’s fraught past and present and reveals problematic patterns at the nexus of broader American identity. In this presentation, Ragland will discuss the project’s strategic focus on the importance of place, the passage of time, and the political dimension of remembrance as means of confronting White supremacist myths of American exceptionalism.

            Jared Ragland is a fine art and documentary photographer and former White House photo editor. His visual practice critically confronts issues of identity, marginalization, and history of place through social science, literary, and historical research methodologies.

            The UM Department of Art and Art History and the Do Good Fund helped make this exhibit and presentation possible. Ragland’s exhibit, What Has Been Will Be Again, will show in the Gammill Gallery February 27–March 31, 2023. Ragland has also exhibited his work in a photo essay of the same name in Study the South, the Center’s online scholarly journal.

             

          • Wed
            08
            Mar
            2023
            5:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

            Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

            "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

            No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

            For assistance related to a disability, contact Irene Kaufmann Cotelo: ikaufman@olemiss.edu 

             

          • Thu
            09
            Mar
            2023
            4:00 pmZoom (Details below)

            Presented by Elizabeth Venell, Ph.D. (Gender Studies).

            Modern paradigms of sexuality and visibility are nowhere more intertwined than in “queer cinema,” and in 2023, LGBTQ+ representation in film has never been more prevalent. Yet popular writing on queer cinema often laments the normalization of today’s proliferating images. Venell traces the origin and irony of this critical discontent, and reimagines the function of queer cinema from being a diagnostic tool to becoming a transformative one. Recent films in foreign horror comprise test cases for this new approach.

            This Sarahtalk will take place via Zoom.

            About: Elizabeth Venell earned a PhD from Emory University in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies with a concentration in Film and Media Studies. She has been an Instructional Assistant Professor of Gender Studies at the University of Mississippi since 2018.

          • Thu
            09
            Mar
            2023
            4:00 pmCoulter Hall 211

            featuring Professor Daniel Tabor (Texas A&M)

          • Thu
            09
            Mar
            2023
            4:00 pmCoulter Hall 211

            Featuring Professor Daniel Tabor (Texas A&M)

          • Wed
            22
            Mar
            2023
            12:00 pmStudent Union Auditorium, Room 124

            “Truman Capote, Ellen DeGeneres, and Miley Cyrus: Southern Stars and the South’s Queer Myths” presented by Tison Pugh

            How do queer southern celebrities adapt the myths of the South to burnish their star personas? This presentation examines three vastly different queer southern stars—Truman Capote, Ellen DeGeneres, and Miley Cyrus—to consider the ways in which the South’s mythologies influence their presentation of their selves, their star personas, and their sexualities. Capote embodied gothic southern decadence during an era of blanket homophobia, DeGeneres presented herself as an avatar of kindness until the façade crumbled, and Cyrus crossed red state/blue state borders first by enacting the tween fantasies of Hannah Montana and then by representing a new brand of out and proud pansexuality. For each of these celebrities, and for a range of other southern stars, queer or not, the South is inextricably linked to their stardom, and its myths both haunt and inspire their celebrity in myriad fascinating ways.

            Tison Pugh, Pegasus Professor of English at the University of Central Florida, is the author or editor of over twenty volumes. His book The Queer Fantasies of the American Family Sitcom won the 2019 Popular Culture Association John Leo and Dana Heller Award for the Best Work in LGBTQ Studies. He is author of Truman Capote: A Literary Life at the MoviesPrecious Perversions: Humor, Homosexuality, and the Southern Literary Canon, and Queer Chivalry: Medievalism and the Myth of White Masculinity in Southern Literature.

            This event is in partnership with the Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies and the Center for Inclusion and Cross-Cultural Engagement.

          • Wed
            22
            Mar
            2023
            5:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

            Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

            "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

            No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

            For assistance related to a disability, contact Irene Kaufmann Cotelo: ikaufman@olemiss.edu 

             

          • Thu
            23
            Mar
            2023
            4:00 pmStudent Union Auditorium, Room 124

            Where does the association of trans womanhood and sex work come from? This talk considers the remarkable life of Mary Jones, a Black trans woman arrested in 1836 in New York City. At trial, Jones testified to the Black social world in which she lived and worked, including a reference to visiting New Orleans. Following the riddle of her journey from New York to the Mississippi Valley, Jones prompts how trans womanhood as a modern way of life may have been built into the emergence of the service economy in the antebellum era, with Black gender caught in the contradictions and symbiosis between enslaved labor and wage labor.

            Sponsored by the Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies and Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

          • Sun
            26
            Mar
            2023
            7:30PM-8:30PMKennon Observatory

            We offer astronomy open houses that are centered around viewings with our telescopes. We view the Moon, the planets, as well as double stars, though what we can see varies each month, depending on what is visible in the night sky during each scheduled open house. We are also planning to schedule additional astronomy themed presentations.

            All these events are weather permitting; however, our additional presentations will be available in case of poor weather conditions.

            Admission is free. Children are welcome!

          • Tue
            28
            Mar
            2023
            4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

            Umberto Tamponi
            Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare

            Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

          • Wed
            29
            Mar
            2023
            Fri
            31
            Mar
            2023

            WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2022

            5:00 p.m.  An OCB Warm-up Event
            Sam Pink (The Ice Cream Man and Other Stories), Big Bruiser Dope Boy (Something Gross), with guest musician Thomas Dollbaum
            The End of All Music

            6:30 p.m. The Future of the South Lecture
            Imani Perry (South to America: A Journey below the Mason-Dixon to Understand the Soul of a Nation), with Derrick Harriell
            Nutt Auditorium

            7:30 p.m. Book Conference Authors Party
            Memory House
            406 University Ave.
            (Advance Ticket Required) 

            THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2022

            9:30 a.m.  The Fight for Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer
            Kate Clifford Larson (Walk with Me: A Biography of Fannie Lou Hamer), in conversation with Ted Ownby
            Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics

            11:00 a.m.  Welcome Lunch at Archives and Special Collections
            Hosted by the Friends of the Library
            Archives and Special Collections
            J.D. Williams Library
            (Lunch is free, but registration appreciated)

            11:30 a.m. Mississippi Humanities Council Presents “Reflecting Mississippi
            Ralph Eubanks (A Place Like Mississippi: A Journey through a Real and Imagined Literary Landscape), welcome by Jennifer Ford
            Archives and Special Collections
            J.D. Williams Library

            1:00 p.m. Remediating Region: New Media and the US South
            Gina Caison, Austin Svedjan, Sherita Johnson, and Margaret T. McGehee, with Katie McKee introducing session
            Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics

            2:30 p.m. National Book Foundation Presents
            Robert Jones Jr. (The Prophets) and Jason Mott (Hell of a Book), with Ralph Eubanks moderating
            Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics

            4:30 p.m. Poetry in the Gallery
            Charlotte Pence (Code), Joshua Nguyen (Come Clean), and Marcela Sulak (City of Skypapers), with Beth Ann Fennelly introducing session
            Southside Gallery on the Oxford Square

            6:00 p.m. Thacker Mountain Radio
            Poet Kendra Allen (The Collection Plate: Poems), authors Jason Mott (Hell of a Book) and Nathan Harris (The Sweetness of Water), and musician Thomas Dollbaum
            The Old Armory Pavilion (an open-air facility on the corner of Bramlett Blvd. and University Ave.)

            FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 2022

            10:30 a.m. “Each Unhappy Family”: Memoir and Memory
            Liz Scheier (Never Simple: A Memoir) and Maud Newton (Ancestor Trouble: A Reckoning and a Reconciliation)
            The Old Armory Pavilion (an open-air facility on the corner of Bramlett Blvd. and University Ave.)

            12:00 p.m. Poetry Talk and Lunch
            Marcela Sulak (City of Skypapers)
            Lafayette County and Oxford Public Library
            (Lunch is free, but registration appreciated)

            1:30 p.m. Writing from the Southwest Review
            Sam Pink (The Ice Cream Man and Other Stories), Kendra Allen (The Collection Plate: Poems), and William Boyle (Shoot the Moonlight Out), with Bobby Rea moderating
            The Old Armory Pavilion (an open-air facility on the corner of Bramlett Blvd. and University Ave.)

            2:45 p.m. Reading and Conversation
            Raven Leilani (Luster), with introduction by Christy Conner and Q&A with Ser Álida
            The Old Armory Pavilion (an open-air facility on the corner of Bramlett Blvd. and University Ave.)

            4:00 p.m. The Presentation of the Willie Morris Awards in Southern Writing
            Monica Weatherly (“If I Had My Grandmama’s Praise”), introduction by Susan Kinsolving and in conversation with Derrick Harriell, and Nathan Harris (The Sweetness of Water), introduction by Jonathan Haupt and in conversation with Amber Nichols-Buckley
            Off Square Books on the Oxford Square

            5:15 p.m. A Willie Morris Awards and Oxford Conference for the Book Celebration
            Reception and Book Signing
            Hosted by the Willie Morris Awards in Southern Writing
            Off Square Books on the Oxford Square

          • Wed
            05
            Apr
            2023
            12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

            “Civil War Memory and the History of Homosexuality” presented by Andrew Donnelly

            Two developments took place at the end of the nineteenth century: one, a national shift of sympathies retrospectively toward the lost Confederate cause and, two, the emergence of homosexuality as an identity in medicine and the law. This talk brings these two seemingly disconnected phenomena together to narrate how the emergence of homosexuality operated alongside Lost Cause ideology to foster nostalgia for a pre-homosexual and pre–Civil War past.

            Andrew Donnelly is a visiting assistant professor of English and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi. His work on Civil War–era culture and the history of sexuality has been published in Civil War HistoryAmerican LiteratureWomen’s Studies, and other venues. He also works with the Freedom Project Network in Mississippi and launched their Freedom Summer Collegiate program, which brings PhD students and university faculty members to teach summer courses at the Freedom Projects in Sunflower, Rosedale, and Meridian, Mississippi.

             

          • Wed
            05
            Apr
            2023
            5:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

            Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

            "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

            No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

            For assistance related to a disability, contact Irene Kaufmann Cotelo: ikaufman@olemiss.edu 

             

          • Tue
            11
            Apr
            2023
            5:30 pmGertrude C. Ford Student Union Plaza

            We encourage student, faculty, and staff to come out and walk with us to raise awareness of campus sexual violence and show support for survivors at Take Back the Night. This is our largest, most impactful annual event to raise awareness of campus sexual violence and support survivors.  We know 1 in 5 women and 1 in 16 men are impacted by sexual violence. Our LGBTQIA+ students, People of Color, and other minoritized identities are disproportionately impacted.  We welcome and would appreciate anyone from the University to come to support this event. We will have an organization fair and time to connect with campus partners, we will have speakers, break the silence walk, refreshments, and then a survivor speak out at the end.

            Sponsored by Rallying Against Sexual Assault (RASA), The Sarah Isom Center For Women and Gender Studies, Violence Intervention and Prevention Services, University Police Department, Student Activity Fee Fund, Ole Miss Athletics 

          • Thu
            13
            Apr
            2023
            5:00 pmStudent Union Auditorium, Room 124

            Sponsored by the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

          • Tue
            18
            Apr
            2023
            4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

            Kristin Lewis
            Project Director, Public Engagement
            American Association for the Advancement of Science

            Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

          • Wed
            19
            Apr
            2023
            5:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

            Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

            "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

            No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

            For assistance related to a disability, contact Irene Kaufmann Cotelo: ikaufman@olemiss.edu 

             

          • Thu
            20
            Apr
            2023
            4:00 pmLGBTQIA+ Lounge, Lamar Hall 4th Floor

            Presented by Melanie Ho, MFA (SouthernDocs).

            What are you supposed to do when you are no longer able to love someone you’re supposed to? what we don’t talk about unpacks gendered familial tensions in the moments leading up to a wedding.

            About: Melanie is a queer Vietnamese American filmmaker and writer with roots in Florida and Mississippi. Her work focuses on trauma, familial relationships, gender, displacement, and intimacy.

            Since graduating from the UCSC’s Social Documentation MFA program, Mel has worked on various projects as an editor and a cinematographer. She is currently a director/producer at the University of Mississippi’s Southern Documentary Project (SouthDocs), creating intentional storytelling in the South. Mel is a 2022 NeXtDoc Fellow and Gotham/HBO DDI Fellow.

          • Fri
            21
            Apr
            2023
            Sun
            23
            Apr
            2023
            7:30 pmMeek Auditorium

            Book and Lyrics by Howard Ashman
            Music by Alan Menken
            Directed by John Carden

            April 21 – 22 at 7:30pm
            April 22 – 23 at 2:00pm
            Fulton Chapel

            A deviously delicious Broadway and Hollywood sci-fi smash musical, Little Shop Of Horrors has devoured the hearts of theatre goers for over 30 years. Howard Ashman and Alan Menken (Disney's The Little Mermaid, Beauty And The Beast, and Aladdin) are the creative geniuses behind what has become one of the most popular shows in the world.

            The meek floral assistant Seymour Krelborn stumbles across a new breed of plant he names "Audrey II" - after his coworker crush. This foul-mouthed, R&B-singing carnivore promises unending fame and fortune to the down and out Krelborn as long as he keeps feeding it, BLOOD. Over time, though, Seymour discovers Audrey II's out of this world origins and intent towards global domination!

          • Tue
            25
            Apr
            2023
            4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

            Robyn Sanderson
            Department of Physics and Astronomy
            University of Pennsylvania
            Center for Computational Astrophysics, Flatiron Institute

            Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

          • Wed
            26
            Apr
            2023
            12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

            “Race and the College Mobility Trap” presented by Ryan Parsons

            Educators are used to telling students that education, and especially higher education, is a reliable pathway to social mobility. For many students, especially young people of color from disadvantaged communities, this pathway is marked by detours, potholes, and other obstacles to “conventional” success. In this talk, Parsons revisits the idea of “the mobility trap”— situations in which people must choose between mobility options that make sense locally and mobility options that make sense nationally—through interviews with a cohort of current Black college students from Sunflower County, Mississippi. These students are enrolled in a range of institutions from local community colleges to private HBCUs to flagship institutions like the University of Mississippi. How are they doing? What does success in college mean for their social networks at home? What do these successes (and challenges) mean for higher education?

            Ryan Parsons is an assistant professor of sociology and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi. In his research, Parsons explores how questions of space and race intersect to structure mobility opportunities, especially in rural and depopulated communities. His dissertation was a community study of Sunflower County in the Mississippi Delta, where he spent three years working with a cohort of young people who aspired to go to college. His teaching draws on these experiences as he helps students think critically about what it means to study a community, and in particular a community they have chosen to call home.

          • Sun
            30
            Apr
            2023
            Sat
            06
            May
            2023
          • Sun
            30
            Apr
            2023
            8:00PM-9:00PMKennon Observatory

            We offer astronomy open houses that are centered around viewings with our telescopes. We view the Moon, the planets, as well as double stars, though what we can see varies each month, depending on what is visible in the night sky during each scheduled open house. We are also planning to schedule additional astronomy themed presentations.

            All these events are weather permitting; however, our additional presentations will be available in case of poor weather conditions.

            Admission is free. Children are welcome!

          • Tue
            02
            May
            2023
            4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

            Matthew Rudolph
            Department of Physics
            Syracuse University

            Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

          • Wed
            03
            May
            2023
            5:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

            Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

            "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

            No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

            For assistance related to a disability, contact Irene Kaufmann Cotelo: ikaufman@olemiss.edu 

             

          • Thu
            04
            May
            2023
            4:00 pmThe Inn at Ole Miss

            Registration and more information to come..

            Sponsored by the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

          • Fri
            05
            May
            2023
            6:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room and Gammill Gallery

            The Spring Documentary Showcase is a celebration of the work by Southern Studies documentary students. Each artist will present their work, followed by a Q&A session.

          • Sun
            28
            May
            2023
            8:30PM-9:30PMKennon Observatory

            We offer astronomy open houses that are centered around viewings with our telescopes. We view the Moon, the planets, as well as double stars, though what we can see varies each month, depending on what is visible in the night sky during each scheduled open house. We are also planning to schedule additional astronomy themed presentations.

            All these events are weather permitting; however, our additional presentations will be available in case of poor weather conditions.

            Admission is free. Children are welcome!

          • Wed
            25
            Oct
            2023
            Sat
            28
            Oct
            2023
            Durham, NC

            The SERMACS 2023 Organizing Committee proudly invites you to join us at the 2023 Southeast Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society (SERMACS) in Durham, NC from October 25-28, 2023.

            Hosted by the North Carolina Section of the American Chemical Society (NCACS). the conference highlights a theme of innovation in the modern chemical sciences. Featuring a vibrant, diverse program of researchers from all disciplines of chemistry, this conference will be fully in-person, providing a welcome opportunity to network, grow together, and reinvigorate science.