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College of Liberal Arts
University of Mississippi

Event Calendar

If you have questions or require assistance relating to a disability, please contact the College of Liberal Arts at ventress@olemiss.edu or (662) 915-1778, or contact the phone or email that may be listed for the particular event. 

  • Thu
    19
    Jan
    2023
    Tue
    31
    Jan
    2023
    J.D. Williams Library

    Eleven University of Mississippi graduate students have curated an exhibition of LGBTQ+ Mississippi materials as a part of a multidisciplinary study on the history of the queer South.

    Amy McDowell, associate professor of sociology, and Eva Payne, assistant professor of history, are leading the cross-listed course Queer Mississippi, in which students study and exhibit evidence of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer communities in the state.

    Read more about this exhibition. 

  • Tue
    24
    Jan
    2023
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Tiffany Lewis:  Building Blocks for Blazars
    Astroparticle Physics Lab
    Goddard Space Flight Center

    Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

  • Wed
    25
    Jan
    2023
    12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

    “Seeing the Unseen” presented by Michael Fagans    

    Too often we walk past things without seeing them for what they are or what they could be. Expanding how we think about images allows us to see the world in a different and broader way. This SouthTalk is an expansion of Fagans’s University of Mississippi TEDx talk, allowing for interaction and conversation with attendees.

    Michael Fagans is a photojournalist, author, and documentary filmmaker and an assistant professor at the School of Journalism and New Media. Fagans enjoys telling people’s stories, and his journey has taken him to the Navajo Nation, Malawi, India, Austria, Afghanistan, Scotland, Canada, the Dominican Republic, Belize, Guatemala, and now Mississippi.

  • Wed
    25
    Jan
    2023
    12:00 pmJohnson Commons Room 212E

    Is student success in human anatomy and physiology impossible, or is it the result of old-school, hard work? 

    Facilitator: Dr. Carol Britson, Instructional Professor of Biology

    Join Dr. Carol Britson from the Department of Biology as she presents the impacts of course design best-practices, student preparation, and the COVID-19 pandemic on student performance in one of the most life-changing courses students may take in college.

    Registration required.

    For assistance related to a disability, contact Melissa Wilson: mwilson@olemiss.edu | 662-915-1391

     

  • Wed
    25
    Jan
    2023
    5:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

    Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

    "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

    No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

    For assistance related to a disability, contact Irene Kaufmann Cotelo: ikaufman@olemiss.edu 

     

  • Thu
    26
    Jan
    2023
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Giacomo Fragione
    Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics
    Northwestern University

    Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

  • Sun
    29
    Jan
    2023
    5:45PM-7:00PMKennon Observatory

    We offer astronomy open houses that are centered around viewings with our telescopes. We view the Moon, the planets, as well as double stars, though what we can see varies each month, depending on what is visible in the night sky during each scheduled open house. We are also planning to schedule additional astronomy themed presentations.

    All these events are weather permitting; however, our additional presentations will be available in case of poor weather conditions.

    Admission is free. Children are welcome!

  • Wed
    01
    Feb
    2023
    12:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    Blackout: The Continuing Assault against Black Bodies” a virtual SouthTalk presented by Barbara Harris Combs

    Blackness in a society built largely on anti-Black sentiments simultaneously renders Black bodies both a heightened sense of visibility and invisibility in society. In this talk, Combs shares insights from her new book, Bodies out of Place: Theorizing Anti-Blackness in U.S. Society, which examines practices of racial entrenchment as they have manifested in post-Obama expressions of anti-Blackness in discursive, legal, interactional, and extralegal contexts. Combs examines recent incidents of everyday racism against Black persons (the killing of Ahmaud Arbery, the Central Park birding incident, various cases on college campuses, among others) to arrive at a theorization of what expectations about bodies, space, and belonging tell us about the way racism is perpetuated in US society.

    Barbara Harris Combs is professor of sociology and chair of the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice at Kennesaw State University. Combs is also the author of From Selma to Montgomery: The Long March to Freedom. Her forthcoming book, Black Places and Spaces of Political Empowerment, with coauthors Todd C. Shaw and Kirk Foster, is under contract with Oxford University Press.

    Preregister for this SouthTalk.

  • Wed
    01
    Feb
    2023
    5:30 pmCenter for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

    Do you identify as bi-racial, multi-racial, multi-ethnic, mixed? Join us on February 1 in the CICCE to meet other bi-racial, multi-racial, multi-ethnic, mixed students at the University, build community, and discuss future opportunities.
    Please use this RSVP form to let us know if you can join us.

    Sponsored by the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

  • Thu
    02
    Feb
    2023
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Michael Fausnaugh
    Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research
    Massachusetts Institute for Technology

    Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

  • Sat
    04
    Feb
    2023
    10AM-12PMUniversity Museum

    Black History Month Series: A look into southern Black people’s rich tradition of Folk Art. Art of the people, for the people, and by the people! Folk Art is made by artists whose creative skills tell tales about their community’s authentic cultural identity. Everyone in the family, adults and children, will embrace their inner Folk Artist and create artwork using non-traditional materials and expressive subject matters. Venture into the Museum to learn and make art inspired by fabulous folk artists like Clementine Hunter, Luster Willis, M.B. Mayfield, LV Hull, and more. Free, open to all ages, pre-registration is not required, free refreshments.

    Sponsored by the University Museum and Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

  • Tue
    07
    Feb
    2023
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Nicholas MacDonald
    Radio Astronomy/VLBI Group
    Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy

    Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

  • Tue
    07
    Feb
    2023
    4:30 pmFulton Chapel

    "What Poets can do" featuring U.S. Poet Laureate Ada Limón

    Ada Limón is the author of six books of poetry, including The Carrying, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry. Limón was also the host of the critically-acclaimed poetry podcast, The Slowdown. Her new book of poetry, The Hurting Kind, is out now from Milkweed Editions. She is the 24th Poet Laureate of The United States.

    Lecture at 5:30 p.m.
    Book signing before and after the event, starting at 4:30 p.m.
    Books will be available for purchase.
    Please wear a mask to this event.

    For more information or assistance relating to a disability, please contact Myra Gilmore, engl@olemiss.edu or 662.915.7439.

  • Wed
    08
    Feb
    2023
    10:00AM-2:00PMGertrude C. Ford Student Union Ballroom

    Do you want to study abroad? Come visit the Study Abroad Fair in the Student Union Ballroom! There will be representatives from various UM Study Abroad partners to speak with you about all of the opportunities related to studying abroad with Ole Miss! Study Abroad programs are offered throughout all terms including summer, intersessions, semesters, and academic year – all for academic credit! Come meet to discuss and learn about how studying abroad can fit into your degree! We are open to all majors on campus!

    Sponsored by the Study Abroad Office

  • Wed
    08
    Feb
    2023
    12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

    “I Don’t Wanna Say the Wrong Thing! How to Reconcile with Race in the Classroom” presented by  Frederick Gooding Jr.

    Discussing topics centering around race can often be awkward and uncomfortable—but it doesn’t always have to be! Uncover and discover how we are closer to racial reconciliation than we think by learning the three key steps we can take inside of our classrooms. This session will persuade attendees to reflect upon their campus practices and consider additional ways in which they can provide welcoming and culturally relevant institutionalized experiences for both their current and future students.

    Frederick Gooding Jr. is an associate history professor and the Dr. Ronald E. Moore Endowed Professor of the Humanities at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, Texas. Featured in national publications such as the New York Times and USA Today, Gooding critically analyzes images within mainstream culture and engages audiences on racial patterns hidden in plain sight. “Dr. G,” as he is affectionately known, has also provided social commentary on CBS, NBC, and Fox News networks, and served as inaugural Chair of TCU’s Race & Reconciliation Initiative.

    Preregister for this SouthTalk.

  • Wed
    08
    Feb
    2023
    4:00 pmGertrude C. Ford Ole Miss Student Union – Room 326

    Join The Center for Inclusion & Cross Cultural Engagement & VIP: Survivor Support Services for a Healthy Relationships Workshop on February 8th, from 4-5p.m in the Student Union room 326. This workshop will allow participants to exploring personal boundaries, practice communication creating personalized communication toolbox, identify green, gray and red flags exploring healthy and unhealthy relationship characteristics. Participants will be invited to engage in individual reflection, small group and large group discussion across different topics throughout the workshop.

    Please feel free to reach out to VIP Program Manager, Christin Dobbs at : cdobbs@olemiss.edu for further information or questions regarding the workshop.

    Registration Required: Registration Form

    Sponsored by VIP: Survivor Support Services & Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

  • Wed
    08
    Feb
    2023
    5:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

    Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

    "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

    No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

    For assistance related to a disability, contact Irene Kaufmann Cotelo: ikaufman@olemiss.edu 

     

  • Thu
    09
    Feb
    2023
    4:00 pmCoulter Hall 211

    featuring Professor Andrew Wilson (Louisville)

  • Thu
    09
    Feb
    2023
    4:00 pmCoulter Hall 211

    Featuring Professor Andrew Wilson (Louisville)

  • Thu
    09
    Feb
    2023
    5:30 pmOverby Center Auditorium

    In 1887 two formerly enslaved cousins bought 840 acres of swampland in the Mississippi Delta. Benjamin T. Green and Isaiah T. Montgomery used the site to found Mound Bayou, which went on to prosper as the largest and most self-sufficient all-Black town in the United States. Promised Land: A Story about Mound Bayou “not only tells the history of Mound Bayou, it celebrates the achievements of its residents and contributes to the conversation about its future,” said Claire Winn, director of programs for the Mississippi Heritage Trust, which funded the project alongside the National Park Service and others.

    A discussion and Q&A will follow the film screening. Castel Sweet, director of UM Center for Community Engagement, will moderate the discussion, and W. Ralph Eubanks, the Black Power at Ole Miss Faculty Fellow at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, will provide opening remarks. Sweet and Eubanks are joined by Mound Bayou-natives and community leaders, Hermon Johnson Jr., Darryl Johnson, and Hermon Johnson Sr.

    Hermon Johnson Jr. is a Mound Bayou native. To support the revitalization of Mound Bayou and the Mississippi Delta area, he cofounded the Mound Bayou Movement nonprofit with his brother, Darryl Johnson, and his father, Hermon Johnson Sr. Hermon is now the executive director of the Mound Bayou Museum of African American Culture and History.

    Darryl Johnson is the founding pastor of the Walk of Faith Covenant Church. He is a former mayor of Mound Bayou, one of five founders of Historic Black Towns and Settlements Alliance, and vice president of World Conference of Mayors.

    Hermon Johnson Sr. is referred to by many as “the man behind the scenes.” After graduating from Southern A&M College and serving in the military, he moved to Mound Bayou, where he originally worked as a field officer for the Magnolia Mutual Life Insurance Company under Dr. T. R. M. Howard, replacing Medgar Evers. Hermon is former vice mayor of Mound Bayou and cofounder and former president of Delta Housing and Development Corporation.

    This event is cosponsored by the Center for the Study of Southern Culture and the Center for Community Engagement.

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  • Tue
    14
    Feb
    2023
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Ayush Dhital, Aniket Khairnar : Student Research Presentations
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

  • Wed
    15
    Feb
    2023
    12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

    Koji Motomura, who is currently working on the translation of Eudora Welty’s Delta Wedding into Japanese, will take up various issues surrounding his translation and discuss them with Annette Trefzer. His topics include the overall reception of Welty’s oeuvre in Japan, the Japanese translations of Welty’s major works, a comparison between the two existing Japanese translations of Delta Wedding, and the difficulties and problems of translating Delta Wedding.

    Koji Motomura is a professor of English at Komazawa University in Tokyo, Japan. He has written twenty-one articles on American literature and published five literary reviews in journals or magazines in Japan. He is the author of sixteen books in Japanese: fifteen books were written jointly with other scholars, and one book, The Dialogue between Texts: A Reading of William Faulkner and Eudora Welty, is single-authored.

    Annette Trefzer is a professor of English at the University of Mississippi. She is the author of Exposing Mississippi: Eudora Welty’s Photographic Reflections and Disturbing Indians: The Archaeology of Southern Fiction. She is coeditor of five volumes in the Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Series published by the University of Mississippi Press.

     

  • Wed
    15
    Feb
    2023
    5:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    Art Talks with Ellen Lupton: typographer, graphic designer, author, and Curator at the Cooper-Hewitt/Smithsonian Design Museum.

    Preregister for this Art Talks

  • Wed
    15
    Feb
    2023
    5:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    Art Talks with Ellen Lupton – typographer, graphic designer, author, and Curator at the Cooper-Hewitt/Smithsonian Design Museum.
    Register for Ellen Lupton's talk

  • Thu
    16
    Feb
    2023
    1:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    “Vietnamese, Cubans, and Mexicans in the South: An Intertwined History”  a virtual SouthTalk presented by Perla M. Guerrero

    How are the histories of Vietnamese, Cubans, and Mexicans in the South articulated through national policies but defined through regional specificities? Perla M. Guerrero’s talk will focus on the Asian and Latinx communities in Arkansas in the last quarter of the twentieth century to explore placemaking. Guerrero argues that to fully understand the experiences of Asians and Latinxs in the South, we must also understand the history of place-specific ideologies that are at the center of more recent instantiations of racialized relationships.

    Guerrero is associate professor of American studies and US Latina/o Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. Her research and teaching interests include relational race and ethnicity with a focus on Latinxs and Asian Americans, space and place, immigration and legality, labor, and US history. She has received multiple awards, including a Ford Postdoctoral Fellowship and two fellowships from the Smithsonian Institution. She is working on her second book about deportation and coerced return to Mexico.

    Preregister for this SouthTalk.

    This event is cosponsored by the University of Mississippi Center for the Study of Race and Racism.

     

  • Thu
    16
    Feb
    2023
    3:00 pmGertrude C. Ford Ole Miss Student Union – Room 326

    Documentary Screening with a discussion to follow with the Black History Month Keynote speaker and director of the film, Dr. Judy Meredith

    Sponsored by the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

  • Thu
    16
    Feb
    2023
    4:00 pmLGBTQIA+ Lounge, Lamar Hall 4th Floor

    Presented by LaToya Faulk, MFA (Writing and Rhetoric).

    Feminine hygiene is a billion-dollar industry and women of color are the largest consumers of feminine hygiene products. Studies link excessive use of feminine hygiene products to harmful endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that cause cancer.

    Earlier last year, I learned of Jacqueline Fox, an Alabama woman who died in 2016 of an ovarian cancer linked to talcum use, and I discovered there were countless other women like her.  Reports show Johnson & Johnson both knew about the link between talcum and ovarian cancer yet marketed the product to Black and Hispanic women after learning that using baby powder was a vaginal hygiene practice used widely among girls and women in Black and Hispanic communities. In researching hygiene rituals, the expression “fresh and clean” showed up repeatedly when Black women shared feelings that came with their use of tampons, powders, soaps, sprays, douches, wipes, lotions, suppositories, napkins, and creams guaranteed to tame the odorous, fluid draining, and menstruating vagina. The idiom “fresh and clean” isn’t just about the importance and continuous presentation of a newly washed female body, though corporations widely use the phrase in this way. Religious conviction, sexism, and racism are corollaries of the frequent use of harmful, unregulated hygiene products.

    I see fiction as a powerful tool for calling into question and reimagining engrained rituals and widely held ideas. We shape the stories we tell, but stories also shape us.  In telling the story of two sisters who struggle with ideas of moral uprightness and obsessive feminine cleanliness, the novel FRESH AND CLEAN interrogates the surveillance of Black female bodies and the ways cleanliness instigates ideas about a woman’s worthiness. I also want readers to consider the deadly consequences of our current consumer culture and how easily we place trust in feminine hygiene products simply because they’re on the shelf.

    About: LaToya Faulk is a recent fiction graduate of the University of Mississippi’s MFA program and a First-Year Writing instructor in The Department of Writing and Rhetoric.  Her work has been published in Scalawag, Southwest Review, Amherst College’s The Common, and Splinter Magazine’s Think Local series. She received a 2022 Pushcart special mention for the essay “In Search of Homeplace,” and she has a forthcoming essay soon to be published in The Global South called “Love is Wanting you Alive.” She lives with her two children in Oxford, Mississippi.

  • Thu
    16
    Feb
    2023
    6:00 pmGertrude C. Ford Student Union Ballroom

    Join us for the Black History Month Keynote featuring Dr. Judy Meredith. As we continue celebrating the legacy of James Meredith and the 60th Anniversary of Integration at the University of Mississippi, Dr. Judy Meredith will share remarks, “The Mystic, The Man: Who is James Meredith?.” The Lift Every Voice award will be presented at the keynote and a reception will follow the keynote.

    Sponsored by the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

  • Fri
    17
    Feb
    2023
    6:00 pmThe Inn at Ole Miss

    Sponsored by the Black Student Union

  • Fri
    17
    Feb
    2023
    Sun
    26
    Feb
    2023
    7:30 pmMeek Auditorium

    Written by Naomi Iizuka
    Directed by Beth Reeves
    February 17 – 18; Feburary 21 – 25 @ 7:30pm
    February 18 – 19; February 25 – 26 @ 2:00pm
    Meek Auditorium

    A visceral blend of classical mythology and real life stories told by street kids, Naomi lizuka's Polaroid Stories journeys into a dangerous world where myth-making fulfills a fierce need for transcendence, where storytelling has the power to transform a reality in which characters' lives are continually threatened, devalued and effaced. Not all the stories these characters tell are true; some are lies, wild yams, clever deceits, baroque fabrications. But whether or not a homeless kid invents an incredible history for himself isn't the point, explains diarist-of-the-street Jim Grimsley. "All these stories and lies add up to something like the truth." Inspired in part by Ovid's Metamorphoses, Iizuka's Polaroid Stories takes place on an abandoned pier on the outermost edge of a city, a way stop for dreamers, dealers and desperadoes, a no-man's land where runaways seek camaraderie, refuge and escape. Serpentine routes from the street to the heart characterize the interactions in this spellbinding tale of young people pushed to society's fringe. Informed, as well, by interviews with young prostitutes and street kids, Polaroid Stories conveys a whirlwind of psychic disturbance, confusion and longing. Like their mythic counterparts, these modem-day mortals are engulfed by needs that burn and consume. Their language mixes poetry and profanity, imbuing the play with lyricism and great theatrical force.

     

  • Mon
    20
    Feb
    2023
    6:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

    "The Mentor as Cartographer:  Seeing Harold Fisk’s Meander Maps as Metaphor" by Beth Spencer, Senior Lecturer in English and 2023 University of Mississippi Humanities Council Teacher of the Year

    A reception will follow the lecture.

  • Tue
    21
    Feb
    2023
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Akshay Khadse, Purnima Narayan: Student Research Presentations
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

  • Wed
    22
    Feb
    2023
    12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

    “Reconciliation: The University and the History of the Ole Miss 89″ presented by Ralph Eubanks and Amirhea Bishop

    On the evening of February 25, 1970, during a performance of the clean-cut and upbeat traveling musical ensemble Up with People, members of the Black Student Union (BSU) engaged in a peaceful protest to get the university to listen to their demands, which included a Black studies program, Black professors and administrators, and scholarships to attract more Black students. Eighty-nine students were arrested that evening and eventually eight of those eighty-nine were expelled. At the time, none of them yet knew they were under surveillance by the FBI and the university.

    W. Ralph Eubanks and Amirhea Bishop will discuss the ways they are seeking to collect and preserve the oral histories of the “Ole Miss 89” and the ways their work is seeking to give the 1970 “Up with People protest” the place it deserves in the history and memory of activism at the University of Mississippi. Ralph Eubanks is the Black Power at Ole Miss Faculty Fellow at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture. A writer and essayist whose work focuses on race, identity, and the American South, his most recent book is A Place Like MississippiA Journey through a Real and Imagined Literary Landscape. 

    Amirhea Bishop is a native of Madison, Mississippi. She is an alumna of Jackson State University and is a first-year MA student in the Center’s Southern Studies program. Amirhea serves as Eubanks’s research assistant for the Black Power at Ole Miss Task Force committee, which documents the stories and preserves the legacy of the Ole Miss 89 through oral histories.

     

  • Wed
    22
    Feb
    2023
    5:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

    Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

    "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

    No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

    For assistance related to a disability, contact Irene Kaufmann Cotelo: ikaufman@olemiss.edu 

     

  • Wed
    22
    Feb
    2023
    5:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

    Gallery Walk: “Within the Bittersweet” with Allison Grant

    Within the Bittersweet is a dark, pastoral narrative about raising children amid concerns about the impacts of climate change and environmental contamination. All the photographs in the exhibition were taken in and around Grant’s home in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, where dense vegetation and natural beauty intersect with industrial and fossil-fuel facilities that dot the region. These industries spread noxious particulates and hazardous toxins across the terrain and into the air, water, and our bodies.

    In Grant’s artwork, the dark realities of the landscape we live in are interlaced with representations of her deep love for her children and the physical world around them—a living tapestry of incredible complexity that her daughters are just coming to know. The climate crisis will undoubtedly reshape the world they inherit, and through these photographs Grant negotiates the beauty and heartbreak of raising them on a wondrous planet amid such rapid and impactful change.

    Allison Grant is an artist, writer, curator, and assistant professor of photography at the University of Alabama. Her artworks have been widely exhibited. She holds an MFA from Columbia College Chicago and BFA from the Columbus College of Art and Design.

  • Sun
    26
    Feb
    2023
    6:15PM-7:30PMKennon Observatory

    We offer astronomy open houses that are centered around viewings with our telescopes. We view the Moon, the planets, as well as double stars, though what we can see varies each month, depending on what is visible in the night sky during each scheduled open house. We are also planning to schedule additional astronomy themed presentations.

    All these events are weather permitting; however, our additional presentations will be available in case of poor weather conditions.

    Admission is free. Children are welcome!

  • Tue
    28
    Feb
    2023
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Woodrow Shew: Brain on the edge: phase transitions and criticality in cerebral cortex
    Department of Physics
    University of Arkansas

    Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

  • Wed
    01
    Mar
    2023
    12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

    Join documentary editor Sarah Garrahan as she talks about strategies for editing documentary feature films, including working with a team, how not to get overwhelmed, and practical skills that help get films to the finish line.

    Sarah Garrahan is a documentary producer and editor from San Antonio, Texas. She is based in Los Angeles, California. She co-produced and was an additional editor on the hybrid documentary The Infiltrators by Cristina Ibarra and Alex Rivera, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 2019 and was awarded the NEXT Audience and Innovator Awards. She edited the Emmy-nominated feature documentary Building the American Dream by Chelsea Hernandez, which premiered at SXSW in 2019 and was broadcast nationally on PBS. She edited the short documentary Status Pending by Priscilla González Sainz, which was supported by IF/Then Shorts and acquired by Al Jazeera. She edited the feature documentary Silent Beauty by Jasmin López, which premiered at the 2022 Hot Docs Film Festival. She holds an MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts from Duke University. She is a former Flaherty Fellow and Felsman Fellow.

  • Wed
    01
    Mar
    2023
    5:30 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105 and on Zoom (preregister with the link below)

    An African American Dilemma: A History of School Integration and Civil Rights in the North presented by Zoë Burkholder

    Since Brown v. Board of Education in 1954, Americans have viewed school integration as a central tenet of the Black civil rights movement. Yet, school integration was not the only—or even always the dominant—civil rights strategy. At times, African Americans also fought for separate, Black-controlled schools dedicated to racial uplift and community empowerment.

    To date, much of what we know about the history of school integration comes from the South. In her book An African American Dilemma: A History of School Integration and Civil Rights in the North, Burkholder offers the first and most comprehensive analysis of the history of Black struggles for educational equality in the North. She argues that since the 1840s, African Americans have employed multiple strategies to fight for equal educational opportunities, including school integration and its opposite—separate, Black-controlled schools. This study considers what is unique about Black struggles for school integration in the North, how these struggles differed from those in the South, and why these regional distinctions matter in shedding light on the complex relationship between school integration and the larger Black freedom struggle.

    Zoë Burkholder is an historian of education, professor of educational foundations, and the founding director of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Human Rights Education Project at Montclair State University.

    This event will also be available for virtual attendance. Register for the webinar.

  • Thu
    02
    Mar
    2023
    4:00 pm

    For more information, contact 662-915-7020 or philosophy@olemiss.edu

  • Thu
    02
    Mar
    2023
    5:00 pmGertrude C. Ford Ole Miss Student Union – Room 323

    We probably all know the unfortunate statistic that women spend nearly twice as much time on housework and childcare as their male counterparts. But more shocking than that calculation is the reality that that is in fact an underestimate of the true gender gap. Allison Daminger introduces us to the idea of cognitive labor, a form of work akin to project management, and demonstrates that this invisible burden falls disproportionately on women. In the pages of both glossy magazines and sober academic journals, household contributions are primarily measured in minutes and documented through time-use diaries. But Daminger argues that we must consider mind-use alongside time-use; the work of constantly anticipating children’s needs, for example, cannot be adequately captured on a time diary. Yet such cognitive labor is a ubiquitous feature of family life, and it represents a burden disproportionately borne by women in different-gender couples—even when those couples aspire to equality.

    Daminger provides new language and conceptual tools to explain why even in egalitarian partnerships, inequality is likely to be explained away or covered up by talk of ‘personality types’. She will also show how cognitive labor inequality emerges in the first place and what forces sustain it.

    Sponsored by the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement, College of Liberal Arts, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies

  • Tue
    07
    Mar
    2023
    12:00 pmGertrude C. Ford Student Union Ballroom

    The University of Mississippi Career Center invites you to participate in the Spring 2023 All Majors Career Expo and Internship Fair. The event is open to all students and all majors! Both internship and full-time job opportunities will be available. Please bring copies of your resume and meet potential employers. PROFESSIONAL DRESS REQUIRED.

    Questions about the career fair? Contact the Career Center at 662-915-7174. Remember we are available to guide you to the right career!

    Sponsored by the Career Center

  • Tue
    07
    Mar
    2023
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Alexey Petrov
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of South Carolina

    Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

  • Wed
    08
    Mar
    2023
    11:00 amGertrude C. Ford Student Union Ballroom

    The University of Mississippi Career Center invites you to participate in the Spring 2023 STEM Fair. The event is open to all students classifications. Both internship/co-op and full-time job opportunities will be available. Please bring copies of your resume and meet potential employers. PROFESSIONAL DRESS REQUIRED.

    Questions about the career fair? Contact the Career Center at 662-915-7174. Remember we are available to guide you to the right career!

    Sponsored by the Career Center

  • Wed
    08
    Mar
    2023
    12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105 and on Zoom (preregister with the link below)

    What Has Been Will Be Again: Place, Time, and the Politics of Remembrance presented by Jared Ragland

    In a moment of pandemic, protest, and polarization, photographer Jared Ragland has journeyed across more than twenty-five thousand miles and into each of Alabama’s sixty-seven counties to survey his home state’s cultural and physical landscape. By tracing the Trail of Tears, the Old Federal Road, and Hernando de Soto’s 1540 expedition route, What Has Been Will Be Again contends with Alabama’s fraught past and present and reveals problematic patterns at the nexus of broader American identity. In this presentation, Ragland will discuss the project’s strategic focus on the importance of place, the passage of time, and the political dimension of remembrance as means of confronting White supremacist myths of American exceptionalism.

    Jared Ragland is a fine art and documentary photographer and former White House photo editor. His visual practice critically confronts issues of identity, marginalization, and history of place through social science, literary, and historical research methodologies.

    The UM Department of Art and Art History and the Do Good Fund helped make this exhibit and presentation possible. Ragland’s exhibit, What Has Been Will Be Again, will show in the Gammill Gallery February 27–March 31, 2023. Ragland has also exhibited his work in a photo essay of the same name in Study the South, the Center’s online scholarly journal.

     

  • Wed
    08
    Mar
    2023
    5:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

    Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

    "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

    No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

    For assistance related to a disability, contact Irene Kaufmann Cotelo: ikaufman@olemiss.edu 

     

  • Thu
    09
    Mar
    2023
    4:00 pmZoom (Details below)

    Presented by Elizabeth Venell, Ph.D. (Gender Studies).

    Modern paradigms of sexuality and visibility are nowhere more intertwined than in “queer cinema,” and in 2023, LGBTQ+ representation in film has never been more prevalent. Yet popular writing on queer cinema often laments the normalization of today’s proliferating images. Venell traces the origin and irony of this critical discontent, and reimagines the function of queer cinema from being a diagnostic tool to becoming a transformative one. Recent films in foreign horror comprise test cases for this new approach.

    This Sarahtalk will take place via Zoom.

    About: Elizabeth Venell earned a PhD from Emory University in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies with a concentration in Film and Media Studies. She has been an Instructional Assistant Professor of Gender Studies at the University of Mississippi since 2018.

  • Thu
    09
    Mar
    2023
    4:00 pmCoulter Hall 211

    featuring Professor Daniel Tabor (Texas A&M)

  • Thu
    09
    Mar
    2023
    4:00 pmCoulter Hall 211

    Featuring Professor Daniel Tabor (Texas A&M)

  • Wed
    22
    Mar
    2023
    12:00 pmStudent Union Auditorium, Room 124

    “Truman Capote, Ellen DeGeneres, and Miley Cyrus: Southern Stars and the South’s Queer Myths” presented by Tison Pugh

    How do queer southern celebrities adapt the myths of the South to burnish their star personas? This presentation examines three vastly different queer southern stars—Truman Capote, Ellen DeGeneres, and Miley Cyrus—to consider the ways in which the South’s mythologies influence their presentation of their selves, their star personas, and their sexualities. Capote embodied gothic southern decadence during an era of blanket homophobia, DeGeneres presented herself as an avatar of kindness until the façade crumbled, and Cyrus crossed red state/blue state borders first by enacting the tween fantasies of Hannah Montana and then by representing a new brand of out and proud pansexuality. For each of these celebrities, and for a range of other southern stars, queer or not, the South is inextricably linked to their stardom, and its myths both haunt and inspire their celebrity in myriad fascinating ways.

    Tison Pugh, Pegasus Professor of English at the University of Central Florida, is the author or editor of over twenty volumes. His book The Queer Fantasies of the American Family Sitcom won the 2019 Popular Culture Association John Leo and Dana Heller Award for the Best Work in LGBTQ Studies. He is author of Truman Capote: A Literary Life at the MoviesPrecious Perversions: Humor, Homosexuality, and the Southern Literary Canon, and Queer Chivalry: Medievalism and the Myth of White Masculinity in Southern Literature.

    This event is in partnership with the Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies and the Center for Inclusion and Cross-Cultural Engagement.

  • Wed
    22
    Mar
    2023
    5:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

    Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

    "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

    No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

    For assistance related to a disability, contact Irene Kaufmann Cotelo: ikaufman@olemiss.edu 

     

  • Thu
    23
    Mar
    2023
    4:00 pmStudent Union Auditorium, Room 124

    Where does the association of trans womanhood and sex work come from? This talk considers the remarkable life of Mary Jones, a Black trans woman arrested in 1836 in New York City. At trial, Jones testified to the Black social world in which she lived and worked, including a reference to visiting New Orleans. Following the riddle of her journey from New York to the Mississippi Valley, Jones prompts how trans womanhood as a modern way of life may have been built into the emergence of the service economy in the antebellum era, with Black gender caught in the contradictions and symbiosis between enslaved labor and wage labor.

    Sponsored by the Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies and Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

  • Sun
    26
    Mar
    2023
    7:30PM-8:30PMKennon Observatory

    We offer astronomy open houses that are centered around viewings with our telescopes. We view the Moon, the planets, as well as double stars, though what we can see varies each month, depending on what is visible in the night sky during each scheduled open house. We are also planning to schedule additional astronomy themed presentations.

    All these events are weather permitting; however, our additional presentations will be available in case of poor weather conditions.

    Admission is free. Children are welcome!

  • Tue
    28
    Mar
    2023
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Umberto Tamponi
    Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare

    Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

  • Wed
    29
    Mar
    2023
    Fri
    31
    Mar
    2023

    WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2022

    5:00 p.m.  An OCB Warm-up Event
    Sam Pink (The Ice Cream Man and Other Stories), Big Bruiser Dope Boy (Something Gross), with guest musician Thomas Dollbaum
    The End of All Music

    6:30 p.m. The Future of the South Lecture
    Imani Perry (South to America: A Journey below the Mason-Dixon to Understand the Soul of a Nation), with Derrick Harriell
    Nutt Auditorium

    7:30 p.m. Book Conference Authors Party
    Memory House
    406 University Ave.
    (Advance Ticket Required) 

    THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2022

    9:30 a.m.  The Fight for Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer
    Kate Clifford Larson (Walk with Me: A Biography of Fannie Lou Hamer), in conversation with Ted Ownby
    Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics

    11:00 a.m.  Welcome Lunch at Archives and Special Collections
    Hosted by the Friends of the Library
    Archives and Special Collections
    J.D. Williams Library
    (Lunch is free, but registration appreciated)

    11:30 a.m. Mississippi Humanities Council Presents “Reflecting Mississippi
    Ralph Eubanks (A Place Like Mississippi: A Journey through a Real and Imagined Literary Landscape), welcome by Jennifer Ford
    Archives and Special Collections
    J.D. Williams Library

    1:00 p.m. Remediating Region: New Media and the US South
    Gina Caison, Austin Svedjan, Sherita Johnson, and Margaret T. McGehee, with Katie McKee introducing session
    Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics

    2:30 p.m. National Book Foundation Presents
    Robert Jones Jr. (The Prophets) and Jason Mott (Hell of a Book), with Ralph Eubanks moderating
    Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics

    4:30 p.m. Poetry in the Gallery
    Charlotte Pence (Code), Joshua Nguyen (Come Clean), and Marcela Sulak (City of Skypapers), with Beth Ann Fennelly introducing session
    Southside Gallery on the Oxford Square

    6:00 p.m. Thacker Mountain Radio
    Poet Kendra Allen (The Collection Plate: Poems), authors Jason Mott (Hell of a Book) and Nathan Harris (The Sweetness of Water), and musician Thomas Dollbaum
    The Old Armory Pavilion (an open-air facility on the corner of Bramlett Blvd. and University Ave.)

    FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 2022

    10:30 a.m. “Each Unhappy Family”: Memoir and Memory
    Liz Scheier (Never Simple: A Memoir) and Maud Newton (Ancestor Trouble: A Reckoning and a Reconciliation)
    The Old Armory Pavilion (an open-air facility on the corner of Bramlett Blvd. and University Ave.)

    12:00 p.m. Poetry Talk and Lunch
    Marcela Sulak (City of Skypapers)
    Lafayette County and Oxford Public Library
    (Lunch is free, but registration appreciated)

    1:30 p.m. Writing from the Southwest Review
    Sam Pink (The Ice Cream Man and Other Stories), Kendra Allen (The Collection Plate: Poems), and William Boyle (Shoot the Moonlight Out), with Bobby Rea moderating
    The Old Armory Pavilion (an open-air facility on the corner of Bramlett Blvd. and University Ave.)

    2:45 p.m. Reading and Conversation
    Raven Leilani (Luster), with introduction by Christy Conner and Q&A with Ser Álida
    The Old Armory Pavilion (an open-air facility on the corner of Bramlett Blvd. and University Ave.)

    4:00 p.m. The Presentation of the Willie Morris Awards in Southern Writing
    Monica Weatherly (“If I Had My Grandmama’s Praise”), introduction by Susan Kinsolving and in conversation with Derrick Harriell, and Nathan Harris (The Sweetness of Water), introduction by Jonathan Haupt and in conversation with Amber Nichols-Buckley
    Off Square Books on the Oxford Square

    5:15 p.m. A Willie Morris Awards and Oxford Conference for the Book Celebration
    Reception and Book Signing
    Hosted by the Willie Morris Awards in Southern Writing
    Off Square Books on the Oxford Square

  • Wed
    05
    Apr
    2023
    12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

    “Civil War Memory and the History of Homosexuality” presented by Andrew Donnelly

    Two developments took place at the end of the nineteenth century: one, a national shift of sympathies retrospectively toward the lost Confederate cause and, two, the emergence of homosexuality as an identity in medicine and the law. This talk brings these two seemingly disconnected phenomena together to narrate how the emergence of homosexuality operated alongside Lost Cause ideology to foster nostalgia for a pre-homosexual and pre–Civil War past.

    Andrew Donnelly is a visiting assistant professor of English and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi. His work on Civil War–era culture and the history of sexuality has been published in Civil War HistoryAmerican LiteratureWomen’s Studies, and other venues. He also works with the Freedom Project Network in Mississippi and launched their Freedom Summer Collegiate program, which brings PhD students and university faculty members to teach summer courses at the Freedom Projects in Sunflower, Rosedale, and Meridian, Mississippi.

     

  • Wed
    05
    Apr
    2023
    5:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

    Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

    "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

    No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

    For assistance related to a disability, contact Irene Kaufmann Cotelo: ikaufman@olemiss.edu 

     

  • Tue
    11
    Apr
    2023
    5:30 pmGertrude C. Ford Student Union Plaza

    We encourage student, faculty, and staff to come out and walk with us to raise awareness of campus sexual violence and show support for survivors at Take Back the Night. This is our largest, most impactful annual event to raise awareness of campus sexual violence and support survivors.  We know 1 in 5 women and 1 in 16 men are impacted by sexual violence. Our LGBTQIA+ students, People of Color, and other minoritized identities are disproportionately impacted.  We welcome and would appreciate anyone from the University to come to support this event. We will have an organization fair and time to connect with campus partners, we will have speakers, break the silence walk, refreshments, and then a survivor speak out at the end.

    Sponsored by Rallying Against Sexual Assault (RASA), The Sarah Isom Center For Women and Gender Studies, Violence Intervention and Prevention Services, University Police Department, Student Activity Fee Fund, Ole Miss Athletics 

  • Thu
    13
    Apr
    2023
    5:00 pmStudent Union Auditorium, Room 124

    Sponsored by the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

  • Tue
    18
    Apr
    2023
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Kristin Lewis
    Project Director, Public Engagement
    American Association for the Advancement of Science

    Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

  • Wed
    19
    Apr
    2023
    5:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

    Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

    "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

    No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

    For assistance related to a disability, contact Irene Kaufmann Cotelo: ikaufman@olemiss.edu 

     

  • Thu
    20
    Apr
    2023
    4:00 pmLGBTQIA+ Lounge, Lamar Hall 4th Floor

    Presented by Melanie Ho, MFA (SouthernDocs).

    What are you supposed to do when you are no longer able to love someone you’re supposed to? what we don’t talk about unpacks gendered familial tensions in the moments leading up to a wedding.

    About: Melanie is a queer Vietnamese American filmmaker and writer with roots in Florida and Mississippi. Her work focuses on trauma, familial relationships, gender, displacement, and intimacy.

    Since graduating from the UCSC’s Social Documentation MFA program, Mel has worked on various projects as an editor and a cinematographer. She is currently a director/producer at the University of Mississippi’s Southern Documentary Project (SouthDocs), creating intentional storytelling in the South. Mel is a 2022 NeXtDoc Fellow and Gotham/HBO DDI Fellow.

  • Fri
    21
    Apr
    2023
    Sun
    23
    Apr
    2023
    7:30 pmMeek Auditorium

    Book and Lyrics by Howard Ashman
    Music by Alan Menken
    Directed by John Carden

    April 21 – 22 at 7:30pm
    April 22 – 23 at 2:00pm
    Fulton Chapel

    A deviously delicious Broadway and Hollywood sci-fi smash musical, Little Shop Of Horrors has devoured the hearts of theatre goers for over 30 years. Howard Ashman and Alan Menken (Disney's The Little Mermaid, Beauty And The Beast, and Aladdin) are the creative geniuses behind what has become one of the most popular shows in the world.

    The meek floral assistant Seymour Krelborn stumbles across a new breed of plant he names "Audrey II" - after his coworker crush. This foul-mouthed, R&B-singing carnivore promises unending fame and fortune to the down and out Krelborn as long as he keeps feeding it, BLOOD. Over time, though, Seymour discovers Audrey II's out of this world origins and intent towards global domination!

  • Tue
    25
    Apr
    2023
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Robyn Sanderson
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Pennsylvania
    Center for Computational Astrophysics, Flatiron Institute

    Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

  • Wed
    26
    Apr
    2023
    12:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room 105

    “Race and the College Mobility Trap” presented by Ryan Parsons

    Educators are used to telling students that education, and especially higher education, is a reliable pathway to social mobility. For many students, especially young people of color from disadvantaged communities, this pathway is marked by detours, potholes, and other obstacles to “conventional” success. In this talk, Parsons revisits the idea of “the mobility trap”— situations in which people must choose between mobility options that make sense locally and mobility options that make sense nationally—through interviews with a cohort of current Black college students from Sunflower County, Mississippi. These students are enrolled in a range of institutions from local community colleges to private HBCUs to flagship institutions like the University of Mississippi. How are they doing? What does success in college mean for their social networks at home? What do these successes (and challenges) mean for higher education?

    Ryan Parsons is an assistant professor of sociology and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi. In his research, Parsons explores how questions of space and race intersect to structure mobility opportunities, especially in rural and depopulated communities. His dissertation was a community study of Sunflower County in the Mississippi Delta, where he spent three years working with a cohort of young people who aspired to go to college. His teaching draws on these experiences as he helps students think critically about what it means to study a community, and in particular a community they have chosen to call home.

  • Sun
    30
    Apr
    2023
    Sat
    06
    May
    2023
  • Sun
    30
    Apr
    2023
    8:00PM-9:00PMKennon Observatory

    We offer astronomy open houses that are centered around viewings with our telescopes. We view the Moon, the planets, as well as double stars, though what we can see varies each month, depending on what is visible in the night sky during each scheduled open house. We are also planning to schedule additional astronomy themed presentations.

    All these events are weather permitting; however, our additional presentations will be available in case of poor weather conditions.

    Admission is free. Children are welcome!

  • Tue
    02
    May
    2023
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Matthew Rudolph
    Department of Physics
    Syracuse University

    Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

  • Wed
    03
    May
    2023
    5:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Boulevard Suite G, Oxford Square

    Are you a member of the Oxford community? Have you taken Spanish in the past, but forgotten most of it? Have you ever used your Spanish in actual conversation?  Are you taking Spanish classes now,  and want to find a place outside of class to use it? Are you a Spanish heritage speaker? Are you a native Spanish speaker?

    "La hora de español en Oxford" invites you to join us. We meet at Heartbreak Coffee by the Square, every two Wednesdays, at 5:00 PM.

    No registration required. Just show up. You will make new friends while practicing your Spanish in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

    For assistance related to a disability, contact Irene Kaufmann Cotelo: ikaufman@olemiss.edu 

     

  • Thu
    04
    May
    2023
    4:00 pmThe Inn at Ole Miss

    Registration and more information to come..

    Sponsored by the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

  • Fri
    05
    May
    2023
    6:00 pmBarnard Observatory, Tupelo Room and Gammill Gallery

    The Spring Documentary Showcase is a celebration of the work by Southern Studies documentary students. Each artist will present their work, followed by a Q&A session.

  • Sun
    28
    May
    2023
    8:30PM-9:30PMKennon Observatory

    We offer astronomy open houses that are centered around viewings with our telescopes. We view the Moon, the planets, as well as double stars, though what we can see varies each month, depending on what is visible in the night sky during each scheduled open house. We are also planning to schedule additional astronomy themed presentations.

    All these events are weather permitting; however, our additional presentations will be available in case of poor weather conditions.

    Admission is free. Children are welcome!

  • Wed
    25
    Oct
    2023
    Sat
    28
    Oct
    2023
    Durham, NC

    The SERMACS 2023 Organizing Committee proudly invites you to join us at the 2023 Southeast Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society (SERMACS) in Durham, NC from October 25-28, 2023.

    Hosted by the North Carolina Section of the American Chemical Society (NCACS). the conference highlights a theme of innovation in the modern chemical sciences. Featuring a vibrant, diverse program of researchers from all disciplines of chemistry, this conference will be fully in-person, providing a welcome opportunity to network, grow together, and reinvigorate science.