skip to main content
College of Liberal Arts
University of Mississippi

Event Calendar

  • Fri
    15
    Jan
    2021
    Sun
    17
    Jan
    2021
    Intensive training opportunity for emerging artists features leading baritone, Lucas Meachem, and pianist Irina Meachem
    The Metropolitan Opera :: Salzburg Festival :: NY Philharmonic
    San Francisco Opera :: GRAMMY Award-winner
    The Living Music Institute offers emerging musicians an intensive training experience designed to help them take their professional musicianship to the next level. Soprano Nancy Maria Balach co-founded the Institute with her UM Music faculty colleague, collaborative pianist and vocal coach Amanda Johnston.
    LMI brings young musicians from across the U.S. and Canada to UM to work with Balach and Johnston and noted guest artists. This year's guest clinicians are of the highest caliber: baritone Lucas Meachem is among opera's most celebrated stars, and pianist Irina Meachem is a renowned collaborative pianist.
    The 2021 Institute will be January 15-17, 2021, and for the first time, LMI will accept applications from instrumentalists as well as singers.
    Because of Covid-19, LMI's trademark feedback and training will be delivered online. Luckily, LMI's parent organization, the Living Music Resource™, has always been committed to online experiences that connect people no matter the location, and Lucas and Irina Meachem are pros at conducting virtual performances, conversations, and events with partners such as the San Francisco Opera/Merola Opera Program.
    Not only are the Meachems acclaimed performers, they are also advocates for greater diversity within classical music. The couple founded The Perfect Day Music Foundation to explore classical music as a way to "address current issues through a traditional art form." To this end, they champion composers of color and sponsor competitions, blogs and events that hand the spotlight to classical singers of color.
    "The Meachems are a fantastic example of artists who excel in their art form, and then use that art form to make a difference in the world around them," said Balach. "They are dream partners who exemplify the concept of 'The Performer as Entrepreneur,' and their willingness to engage individually with the LMI participants is truly unique."
    This is the second year that the Living Music Institute will coach participants not only on technique, tone, and performance, but will also support them as entrepreneurs who want to put their music to work. "We will award both a Performance Winner and an Entrepreneurial Winner -- both carry cash prizes," Balach said.
  • Tue
    19
    Jan
    2021
    Fri
    05
    Feb
    2021
    Gallery 130 Meek Hall

    Department of Art & Art History Spring 2021 MFA Student Show

    Gallery 130 is open M–F, 8 AM to 5 PM. You can view the exhibition in-person, masked, and with social distancing.

  • Tue
    19
    Jan
    2021
    6:00 pm

    Invitation: Science is fun at the Oxford Science Cafe! Come and join us for a presentation by Dr. Wayne Gray, instructional assistant professor, from the UM Biology Department. He will be talking to us on "Understanding Vaccines: Preventing Diseases from Smallpox to COVID-19."

    These days everyone is talking about vaccines and hoping for an end to the COVID-19 pandemic. Vaccines are a miracle of modern medicine. At this month’s science café, we’ll address several questions concerning vaccines: How do they work to prevent disease? How safe are vaccines and why do some people have concerns about vaccines? What is herd immunity? What are the various types of vaccines? We’ll review the history of vaccines and discuss several of the more than 20 vaccines that are now routinely given to children and adults. Finally, we’ll examine the current COVID-19 vaccines and consider their effectiveness and safety. Issues regarding COVID-19 vaccine distribution will be discussed.
    When: Tuesday, January 19, 2020, 6pm - 7pm CT.
    Where: Zoom! Meeting ID: 975 6831 5885 
    or click on the following link: https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/97568315885
    Cost: Free!

    Oxford Science Café: Monthly conversations about the science we know and
    the science we don't know. Everyone is invited, and children are welcome!
    Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.
  • Wed
    20
    Jan
    2021
    4:00 pm

    Two Southern Studies virtual open houses are planned. The first option is Wednesday, Jan. 20 at 4 p.m. CST and the second option is Friday, Jan. 22 at 1 p.m. CST. Both events are opportunities for people to ask questions and learn more about the graduate programs at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture. To register, click here.

  • Fri
    22
    Jan
    2021
    1:00 pm

    Two Southern Studies virtual open houses are planned. The first option is Wednesday, Jan. 20 at 4 p.m. CST and the second option is Friday, Jan. 22 at 1 p.m. CST. Both events are opportunities for people to ask questions and learn more about the graduate programs at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture. To register, click here.

  • Wed
    27
    Jan
    2021
    12:00 pm

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) exploring the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public.

    Due to COVID-19, we’ve gone virtual. To watch the prerecorded talks, click in the individual event below or visit our YouTube channel, and register here to receive the link for live Q&A with presenters.

    In early 1960 Black students across the nation launched nonviolent direct-action campaigns in more than seventy cities across the nation, challenging Jim Crow segregation and violence. These students took courageous action knowing they would face arrest, expulsion, or even lose their lives. So why did they do it? Anthony Siracusa argues that the political philosophy of religious nonviolence was a key motivation for many. Siracusa excavates the history of this idea in his forthcoming book, Nonviolence Before King: The Politics of Being and the Black Freedom Struggle, and explains how what he calls a “politics of being” came to occupy a central place in the Black freedom struggle.

    A historian of modern America and a civic engagement professional in higher education, Anthony Siracusa works at the intersection of the community and the academy. He has written extensively about nonviolence and the Black freedom movement, and his first book, Nonviolence Before King: The Politics of Being and the Black Freedom Struggle, will be released by UNC Press in June 2021. He teaches a variety of courses on African American history, religion, and politics in addition to community-based learning courses. He also develops and administers projects and programs in partnership with communities beyond the campus to enhance student learning and strengthen community impacts. Siracusa is a native of Memphis, Tennessee, and lives in Oxford, Mississippi.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Thu
    28
    Jan
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    01/28/2021 Prof. Ellen Sletten (UCLA) will present a seminar to the chemistry department

  • Tue
    09
    Feb
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    Feb. 9, 4:00 p.m., the Department of Philosophy and Religion is hosting a webinar with Dr. Frances Flannery, from James Madison University, "Peacebuilding in an Era of Radical Right Extremism:  Where to Go From Here."  Dr. Flannery specializes in violent extremism and apocalyptic movements.  Registration is required (easy and free) and the link is included below; it's also available on myolemiss.

    You are invited to a Zoom webinar.

    When: Feb 9, 2021 04:00 PM Central Time (US and Canada)
    Topic: Dr. Frances Flannery, James Madison University

    Peacebuilding in an Era of Radical Right Extremism: Where to Go From Here

     

    On January 6, 2021, tens of thousands streamed to Washington DC to speak out against what they saw as a fraudulent election that would unfairly elect Joe Biden as President and oust Donald Trump. Among the protestors were representatives of violent organizations, including Christian Nationalists, QAnon, and white supremacist hate groups who would proceed to commit domestic terrorism by storming the Capitol building in search of Congresspersons to attack, punish, and even kill. This lecture will explain the apocalyptic roots of radical right extremism to understand what makes the ideology of violent extremism appealing to so many, what we can expect in the future, and how we can finally begin to stem the cycle of radicalization and heal our nation.

    Register in advance for this webinar:
    https://olemiss.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_7fpVVxwOR7eV_X_izFXsiA

     

  • Wed
    10
    Feb
    2021
    12:00 pm@Online

    SouthTalks: “Southern Journey: The Migrations of the American South, 1790–2020” @ Online
    Feb 10 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

    In this talk, Edward L. Ayers narrates the evolution of southern history from the founding of the nation to the present day by focusing on the set­tling, unsettling, and resettling of the South. Using migration as the dominant theme of southern his­tory and including Indigenous, white, Black, and immigrant people in the story, Ayers cuts across the usual geographic, thematic, and chronological boundaries that subdivide southern history.

    Ayers explains the major contours and events of the southern past from a fresh perspective, weav­ing geography with history in innovative ways. He uses unique color maps created with sophisticated tools to in­terpret massive data sets from a humanistic per­spective, providing a view of movement within the South with a clarity, detail, and continuity we have not seen before. The South has never stood still; it is—and always has been—changing in deep, radical, sometimes contradictory ways, often in divergent directions. Ayers will be in conversation with Ted Ownby, professor of history and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi.

    Edward L. Ayers has been named National Professor of the Year, received the National Humanities Medal from President Obama at the White House, won the Bancroft, Beveridge, and Lincolns Prizes in American history, was a finalist for the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize, served as president of the Organization of American Historians, and worked as the founding chair of the board of the American Civil War Museum. He is executive director of New American, dedicated to sharing innovative work in words, maps, audio, and video with broad audiences and the nation’s schools. He is Tucker-Boatwright Professor of the Humanities and president emeritus at the University of Richmond, as well as a former dean of arts and sciences at the University of Virginia.

    Ted Ownby is William F. Winter Professor of History and Southern Studies, coeditor of The Mississippi Encyclopedia, and author of Hurtin’ Words: Debating Family Problems in the Twentieth-Century South and other works.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Wed
    10
    Feb
    2021
    5:00 pm

    Join the Department of Classics for a bardic performance of original songs based on Homer's Iliad, with discussion following. (mpranger@olemiss.edu).

    Join us on Zoom (https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/95241795849) or for a live watch-party in Bryant 209 (maximum 30 in person; performance will still be remote).
    If you plan to watch live please register by emailing mpranger@olemiss.edu.

    For assistance related to a disability, contact Molly Pasco-Pranger: mpranger@olemiss.edu | 662-915-7097

  • Thu
    11
    Feb
    2021
    12:00 pm@ Online

    SouthTalks: “Protests in Pro Football, 1965–2020” @ Online

    Feb 11 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

    Chuck Ross’s “Protests in Pro Football, 1965–2020” talk examines both the events leading up to the 1965 American Football League All-Star game protest and the events that led to Colin Kapernick’s 2016 NFL protest. Ross will also discuss the legacy of Kapernick’s actions in the wake of the death of George Floyd and the different responses by professional sports leagues and teams in America.

    Chuck Ross is a native of Columbus, Ohio, and currently is professor of history and African American studies at the University of Mississippi. He holds a B.A. in history from Stillman College. He has an M.A. in Black studies, an M.A. in history, and a Ph.D. in history, each from The Ohio State University. He is the author of, Mavericks, Money, and Men: The AFL, Black Players, and the Evolution of Modern Football, which was published by Temple University Press in 2016, and Outside the Lines: African Americans and the Integration of the National Football League, which was released by New York University Press in 1999. His teaching interests include twentieth-century US history, African American history, and sports history. He has appeared on ESPN’s Outside the Lines and on ESPN Radio.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Thu
    11
    Feb
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    02/11/2021 Prof. Vikas Nanda (Rutgers) will present a seminar to the department

    4:00 pm, Zoom, https://chemistry.olemiss.edu/

  • Wed
    17
    Feb
    2021
    12:00 pm@ Online

    SouthTalks: “Masked Man, Black: Pandemic and Protest Poems” @ Online

    Feb 17 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

    Frank X Walker will read from and discuss his latest collection of poems, Masked Man, Black: Pandemic and Protest Poems. The poems document in real time the myriad of challenges presented by the multiple pandemics of Covid-19 and racial injustice. They also offer edifying pockets of solace as the poet shares his family’s survival tips, strategies, and discoveries in midst of so much loss, while properly laying blame at the feet of the administration that unnecessarily politicized, misled, and further complicated this country’s response to the virus. University of Mississippi associate professor of English and African American studies Derrick Harriell will facilitate the Q&A portion of this event.

    Frank X Walker is the first African American writer to be named Kentucky Poet Laureate. He has published eleven collections of poetry, including Masked Man, Black: Pandemic and Protest Poems and Turn Me Loose: The Unghosting of Medgar Evers, which was awarded the 2014 NAACP Image Award for Poetry and the Black Caucus American Library Association Honor Award for Poetry. Voted one of the most creative professors in the South, Walker coined the term “Affrilachia” and cofounded the Affrilachian Poets. He is the founding editor of pluck! The Journal of Affrilachian Arts and Culture and serves as professor of English and African American and Africana studies at the University of Kentucky in Lexington.

    Derrick Harriell is the Otillie Schillig Associate Professor of English and African American Studies at the University of Mississippi. His poem collections are Cotton (2010), Ropes (2013, winner of the 2014 Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters award in poetry), and Stripper in Wonderland (2017). His poems, stories, and essays have been published widely.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Thu
    18
    Feb
    2021
    12:00 am

    Many Crofties come into college knowing two things: they want to do international studies and they want to live in Washington DC after graduation. This panel will be made up of Croft alumni who are now living and working in DC. They will share their experiences on finding, applying, and working their way through all the challenges to get to DC.

  • Thu
    18
    Feb
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    All events will be held via Zoom. To get more information or to register, visit https://sarahisomcenter.org/events

    Shennette Garrett-Scott, associate professor of history and African American Studies, will discuss the life and impact of Mary Cordelia Montgomery Booze in our first Sarahtalk of the semester.

    About Mary Cordelia Montgomery Booze:

    Born Mary Montgomery in March 1878 to parents who had been enslaved when young, she grew up in the Mississippi Delta. Her father, Isaiah T. Montgomery (1847-1924), was a cotton producer politically allied with the famous Republican educator Booker T. Washington. In 1887, the Montgomerys moved to Bolivar County south of Clarksdale in the rich delta country of northwestern Mississippi. There Montgomery founded an all-black agricultural community, Mound Bayou, located along the Mississippi River. Mary was educated locally before going to New Orleans, Louisiana, where she studied for two years at the historically black Straight University. She returned to Mound Bayou and worked as a bookkeeper in the family business. She also taught at the teacher-training Mound Bayou Normal Institute.

    Despite state restrictions that effectively disenfranchised most blacks, Booze joined the Republican Party. Beginning in 1924, she served as a committeewoman from Mississippi to the Republican National Committee, the first African-American woman to hold that position.

  • Wed
    24
    Feb
    2021
    12:00 pm@ Online

    SouthTalks: “The Emmett Till Generation: Youth Activism, Radical Protest, and Social Change in Jim Crow Mississippi” @ Online

    Feb 24 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

    Daphne Chamberlain’s talk highlights the role of children as leaders and participants in the Mississippi civil rights movement between 1946 and 1965. This presentation also offers a new perspective on the origins of the civil rights struggle and gives credence to how instrumental young people were to engaging in radical protest and grassroots activism in Mississippi.

    Chamberlain completed her undergraduate studies at Tougaloo College in 2001 and received her M.A. and Ph.D. in history from the University of Mississippi. Before returning to Tougaloo as a faculty member, Chamberlain was the founding director of the COFO Civil Rights Education Center at Jackson State University. In 2013 Chamberlain returned to Tougaloo College, where she is an associate professor of history and the associate provost and vice president for academic affairs.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Wed
    24
    Feb
    2021
    5:00 pm@Online

    In addition to the many artists the Department of Art & Art History invites to campus through student organizations they also have an established visiting artist program called Art Talks. This program creates access to artists via webcam and in-person lectures, and it provides students access to keep pace with critical thought, contemporary artistic practice, and emerging technology used in cultural production today.

    February 24, 2021 at 5:00 pm

    Margaret Vendryes, Art Historian, Artist, and Curator | mrvendryes.com

    Margaret Rose Vendryes entered the faculty of York College and The Graduate Center in 2000. She is the author of Barthé, A Life in Sculpture (2008). Vendryes returned to York College, in 2013, as Distinguished Lecturer in Fine Arts and Director of the York College Fine Arts Gallery after a seven-year absence during which she established a successful studio practice. As a visual artist, Vendryes is best known for her painting series The African Diva Project which merges African masks with commercial images of popular black women soloists. She is currently Chair of the Department of Performing and Fine Arts.

    Zoom Meeting Information
    Register in advance for this meeting:
    https://olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIpcOCopzIuGtYAKPHbQp7w8c0Jkd8KQy2a
    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

  • Thu
    25
    Feb
    2021
    Sun
    28
    Feb
    2021
    SFA Zoom Room

    2021 SFA Writing Workshop

    Announcing the 2021 SFA Writing Workshop

    The Southern Foodways Alliance tells stories about American food culture. We commission great writing. And we foster emerging and mid-career writers whose work explores food and foodways. With those goals in mind, we are now taking applications for an SFA nonfiction writing workshop to be held via Zoom February 25-28, 2021. SFA director John T. Edge and managing editor Sara Camp Milam are your leaders. Together they bring nearly three decades of editorial experience and twenty books (written, cowritten, or edited) to the table.

    Applicants should be at work on a book or longform feature story at the time of application. It does not have to be under contract or placed for publication. The work must be nonfiction and closely tied to themes of food or foodways. Preference is given to applicants whose work is set in, or tied to, the American South. Applicants at work on a longform audio story are eligible for consideration.

    Wondering if this workshop is for you? Past workshop participants have included chefs working on their first cookbooks, journalists aiming to direct their attention to food and foodways, and academics who wish to present their scholarship to a general audience.

    Vivian Howard, chef, television host, and author of Deep Run Roots, is a graduate.

    “When I attended the SFA writer’s workshop I doubted I had the know-how to write anything other than a noteworthy email,” she told us. “But the collaborative experience of writing, reading and listening to other authors allowed me the opportunity to hear my voice in a way that validated it. The experience was a turning point that armed me with confidence, direction and community.”

    Workshop graduates have published essays and reportage in Gravy, the SFA’s quarterly journal. And they have written award-winning books that got better under SFA guidance. If you’re looking for guidance, great conversation, and time to step away from your day job and into the writing life, you’ll find it here.

    The workshop begins at 5 pm on Thursday, February 25, and ends at Noon on Sunday, February 28. It provides a mix of group discussion, one-on-one editorial consultation, and self-directed writing time. Tuition of $100 includes all instruction.

    HOW  TO APPLY:

    A complete application consists of 3 parts: cover letter, project description, and writing sample.

    Cover letter: No more than one page, telling us about yourself as a writer—previous publications, areas of interest, etc.

    Project description: No more than one page, describing your project. What is it about? Who is the intended audience? Where are you now, and where do you plan to be when you arrive for the workshop? What do you hope to gain from working with SFA editors?

    Writing sample: 5-10 pages in length, nonfiction, published or unpublished. The sample may consist of one longer piece or multiple shorter works. It does not have to be related to the project you wish to pursue for the workshop.

    Please submit your application via email to Melissa Booth Hall at melissa@southernfoodways.org. Subject line should read “[Your last name] – Writing Workshop Application.” Please attach your application components as Word documents or PDFs.

    There is no application fee. One scholarship is available. Please indicate in your cover letter if you wish to be considered for the scholarship. The scholarship covers workshop tuition.

    APPLICATIONS ARE DUE at 5 pm Central Time on Friday, January 15, 2021. Late applications will not be reviewed. Successful applicants will be notified of their acceptance by Monday, January 25, 2021.

  • Thu
    25
    Feb
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    02/25/2021 Prof. Jorge Gonzalez (University of Valencia) will present a seminar to the department

    4:00 pm, Zoom, https://chemistry.olemiss.edu/

  • Wed
    03
    Mar
    2021
    12:00 pm@ Online

    SouthTalks: “White Kids: Growing Up with Privilege in a Racially Divided America” @ Online

    Mar 3 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
    American children are living in a world of ongoing public debates about race, daily displays of racial violence, and for some, an increased awareness of inequality. Based on two years of ethnographic research with affluent white kids and their families, Margaret A. Hagerman’s talk examines how white kids learn about race, racism, inequality, and privilege in the contexts of their everyday lives. This talk explores how white racial socialization is a process that stretches beyond white parents’ explicit conversations with their white children and includes not only the choices parents make about neighborhoods, schools, peer groups, extracurricular activities, and media, but also the choices made by the kids themselves.

    Margaret A. Hagerman is an associate professor of sociology at Mississippi State University and is a faculty affiliate in the African American studies and gender studies programs there. She is the author of White Kids: Growing Up with Privilege in a Racially Divided America (2019), and she is a nationally recognized expert on white racial socialization. Her research can be found in publications such as the Journal of Marriage and Family, Sociology of Race and Ethnicity, and Ethnic and Racial Studies, among others. She has visited a number of schools and communities across the country to share her work with parents, teachers, neighborhood associations, school administrators, and young people.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Wed
    03
    Mar
    2021
    4:30 pmZoom

    The Department of Classics and The Archaeological Institute of America Present a Virtual Lecture

    ProfessorCarrie Atkins, The Department of Historical Studies, The University of Toronto, Mississauga

    “Shipwrecks and the Transport of Luxury in the Roman Mediterranean”

    https://utoronto.zoom.us/j/85949519411

    Wednesday, March 3rd at 4:30 PM

  • Wed
    03
    Mar
    2021
    5:00 pm@Online

    In addition to the many artists the Department of Art & Art History invites to campus through student organizations, they also have an established visiting artist program called Art Talks. This program creates access to artists via webcam and in-person lectures, and it provides students access to keep pace with critical thought, contemporary artistic practice, and emerging technology used in cultural production today.

    March 03, 2021 at 5:00 pm

    Ben Snell, Artist | bensnell.io

    Ben Snell is an artist who listens to and amplifies the inner dialogues of machines. Using contemporary techniques and traditional motifs, he navigates the space between creation and automation, suggesting a humanist approach to technology.

    Zoom Meeting Information
    Register in advance for this meeting:
    https://olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJcud-2trz4vE92bBQAclp9ZKEpulg7ee1A6
    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

  • Thu
    04
    Mar
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    All events will be held via Zoom. To get more information or to register, visit https://sarahisomcenter.org/events

    Join the Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies for a roundtable discussion with women chairs in the College of Liberal Arts as they discuss their own experiences and challenges. Those schedule to participate are:

    • Nancy Maria Balach - Music
    • Kirsten Dellinger - Sociology/College of Liberal Arts
    • Katie McKee - Center for the Study of Southern Culture
    • Molly Pasco-Pranger - Classics
    • Rebekah Smith - Psychology
    • Caroline Wigginton - English
    • Noell Wilson - History
    • Ethel Young-Scurlock - African American Studies
    • Jaime Harker - Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies (moderator)
  • Fri
    05
    Mar
    2021
    2:00 pmZoom

    Date: Friday, March 5, 2021, 2:00 – 2:50pm

    Speaker: Dr. Chris Muir
    Assistant professor, School of Life Sciences, University of Hawaii
    Seminar title: Global syntheses of stomatal evolution and local adaptationa

    Host: Dr. Peter Zee, assistant professor of biology, zee@olemiss.edu

    All biology seminars will be held via Zoom. Please contact host for further information.

  • Mon
    08
    Mar
    2021
    Fri
    12
    Mar
    2021
    Virtual

    https://oxfordconferenceforthebook.com/

    Founded by the Center and Square Books, the conference brings together fiction and nonfiction writers, journalists, artists, poets, publishers, teachers, students, and literacy advocates for three days of conversation in the literary town of Oxford, Mississippi.

    The 27th Oxford Conference for the Book will take place March 8 – March 12, 2021. DUE TO COVID-19, ALL EVENTS ARE VIRTUAL.

  • Mon
    08
    Mar
    2021
    4:00 pmVirtual

    Brian Foster, assistant professor of sociology and Southern Studies and the 2021 University of Mississippi Humanities Teacher of the Year, will speak on "I Don't Like the Blues: A Lesson on Listening."

    Register in advance for this webinar:

     

  • Mon
    08
    Mar
    2021
    6:30 pmZoom

    Mab Segrest is professor emeritus of gender and women’s studies at Connecticut College and the author of Administrations of Lunacy: Racism and the Haunting of American Psychiatry at the Milledgeville Asylum, Memoir of a Race Traitor, Born to Belonging: Writings on Spirit and Justice, and My Mama’s Dead Squirrel: Lesbian Essays on Southern Culture. A longtime activist in social justice movements and a past fellow at the National Humanities Center, she lives in Durham, North Carolina.

    The Lecture will take place on Monday, March 8th at 6:30 PM.  If you are interested in attending, please click here to register.

    The Lunacy Radio Hour hosted by Mab Segrest with special guests: Dr. Ralph H. Didlake, Dr. Jeni Bond, and Jay Watson will take place on Tuesday, March 9th at 5 PM.  If you are interested in attending, please click here to register.

    If you have any additional questions, please email engl@olemiss.edu.

    Mission Statement
    The Edith T. Baine Lecture Series for Scholars and Writers invites the best and brightest scholars and writers to our campus. The Baine lecturers and writers are chosen on the basis of energetic and engaged scholarship and creative work, innovative approaches, and dynamic presentation styles. The lectures showcase paradigm-shifting research and groundbreaking writing. The visiting scholars and writers are intended to expose undergraduates to the fullness of a life deeply engaged in literature while inspiring graduate students to pursue ambitious work.

    Edith T. Baine
    Mrs. Edith Turley Baine of El Dorado was born November 29, 1945 in Greenville, Mississippi, the daughter of Edith Waits Turley and George Turley. She graduated from Leland High School and the University of Mississippi, where she received B.A.E. and M.A.E. degrees. Mrs. Baine was a member of the First Presbyterian Church of El Dorado, El Dorado Service League, Phi Mu Sorority and Delta Theta Phi Law Fraternity International. She was a former member of the Board of Directors of the Union County Humane Society. She was an El Dorado Jaycettes and later became an El Dorado Jaycee. She was a tree farmer and retired English teacher who taught in Mississippi and at El Dorado High School. On April 13, 2012, Mrs. Baine passed away at Baptist Health Medical Center in Little Rock. Her generous gift to the English Department at the University of Mississippi supports this lecture series and promotes academic and creative exchange.

  • Tue
    09
    Mar
    2021
    5:00 pmZoom

    Mab Segrest is professor emeritus of gender and women’s studies at Connecticut College and the author of Administrations of Lunacy: Racism and the Haunting of American Psychiatry at the Milledgeville Asylum, Memoir of a Race Traitor, Born to Belonging: Writings on Spirit and Justice, and My Mama’s Dead Squirrel: Lesbian Essays on Southern Culture. A longtime activist in social justice movements and a past fellow at the National Humanities Center, she lives in Durham, North Carolina.

    The Lecture will take place on Monday, March 8th at 6:30 PM.  If you are interested in attending, please click here to register.

    The Lunacy Radio Hour hosted by Mab Segrest with special guests: Dr. Ralph H. Didlake, Dr. Jeni Bond, and Jay Watson will take place on Tuesday, March 9th at 5 PM.  If you are interested in attending, please click here to register.

    If you have any additional questions, please email engl@olemiss.edu.

    Mission Statement
    The Edith T. Baine Lecture Series for Scholars and Writers invites the best and brightest scholars and writers to our campus. The Baine lecturers and writers are chosen on the basis of energetic and engaged scholarship and creative work, innovative approaches, and dynamic presentation styles. The lectures showcase paradigm-shifting research and groundbreaking writing. The visiting scholars and writers are intended to expose undergraduates to the fullness of a life deeply engaged in literature while inspiring graduate students to pursue ambitious work.

    Edith T. Baine
    Mrs. Edith Turley Baine of El Dorado was born November 29, 1945 in Greenville, Mississippi, the daughter of Edith Waits Turley and George Turley. She graduated from Leland High School and the University of Mississippi, where she received B.A.E. and M.A.E. degrees. Mrs. Baine was a member of the First Presbyterian Church of El Dorado, El Dorado Service League, Phi Mu Sorority and Delta Theta Phi Law Fraternity International. She was a former member of the Board of Directors of the Union County Humane Society. She was an El Dorado Jaycettes and later became an El Dorado Jaycee. She was a tree farmer and retired English teacher who taught in Mississippi and at El Dorado High School. On April 13, 2012, Mrs. Baine passed away at Baptist Health Medical Center in Little Rock. Her generous gift to the English Department at the University of Mississippi supports this lecture series and promotes academic and creative exchange.

  • Thu
    11
    Mar
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    03/11/2021 Prof. Daniel Crawford (Virginia Tech) will present a seminar to the department

    4:00 pm, Zoom, https://chemistry.olemiss.edu/

  • Sat
    13
    Mar
    2021
    Sun
    14
    Mar
    2021
    @Online

    2021 Spring Symposium: Environments and Transformation

    Tickets go on sale Tuesday, January 19 at 10 a.m. CT.

    The Southern Foodways Alliance is delighted to announce Jon-Sesrie Goff as the guest curator of the 2021 Spring Symposium.  As a multidisciplinary artist whose work crosses different mediums and platforms, Goff is renowned for his penchant to seamlessly integrate social engagement, film, moving image, performance, photography and installation. His practice explores the intersection of race, power, identity, gender and the environment by unearthing the visceral representational value and authenticity behind the images propelled across varying diasporas.

    ***

    Join SFA for the 2021 Spring Symposium, scheduled March 13-14, 2021, when we focus on environments and transformation through the medium of film. Filmmakers ask questions that connect Birmingham’s Greek community and Choctaw Native peoples.  Expect an archival surrealist dive into the lives of the women who powered the Underground railroad.  Learn about Milwaukee as a terminus for the Great Migration.  Those questions begin in the South and span the world.

    Featuring filmmakers Colleen Thurston, Jessica Chriesman, Paavo Hanninen, Devon “Vonnie Quest” Smith, and Madeleine Hunt-Ehrlich, among others, the symposium will be delivered to your smart TV or laptop via the Eventive platform. Live Q&A sessions will offer opportunities to connect with presenters.

    Tickets, priced at $75 each, go on sale January 19, 2021 at 10 a.m. CT.

  • Mon
    15
    Mar
    2021
    Fri
    26
    Mar
    2021
    8:00AM-5:00PMGallery 130 Meek Hall

    Current faculty members in the Department of Art & Art History will have works in Gallery 130! Please practice safe, social distancing.

  • Tue
    16
    Mar
    2021
    12:00 amZoom

    Oxford Science Cafe Quiz Bowl

    Host: Dr. Gavin Davies, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy

    Join us for a night of fun and trivia! Match wits with other science enthusiasts! Win prizes!

    March 16, 2021, 6:00pm - 7:00pm
    Via Zoom

     

  • Wed
    17
    Mar
    2021
    9:00 amZoom

    Philosophy Forum: Professor Maria Rosa Antognazza and The Distinction in Kind between Knowledge and Belief.

    For details, visit:

    https://philosophy.olemiss.edu/33302-2/

     

  • Wed
    17
    Mar
    2021
    12:00 pm@ Online

    SouthTalks: “Indigenous Cultures and Histories of the Southeast” @ Online

    Mar 17 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
    The Original Peoples of the Southeast differed culturally, politically, and linguistically from other tribes across North America. The Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee, and Seminole Nations were forcibly removed from their traditional homelands and relocated to Oklahoma. In her talk, Dwanna L. McKay will examine some of the unique cultural practices and diverse histories of Indigenous Nations originally of the southeastern woodlands from precontact to current day.

    Dwanna L. McKay is a citizen of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation and an assistant professor in the race, ethnicity, and migration studies program at Colorado College. McKay holds a PhD in sociology, a graduate certificate in Indigenous studies, an MS in sociology, an MBA in management science, and a BA in political science. Raised culturally within the boundaries of her tribal nation in Oklahoma, McKay centers her teaching, research, service, and activism on an overall commitment to social justice. Her research focuses on social inequality and Indigenous identity, and has been published in numerous scholarly journals, including Sociological Compass, Sociology of Race and Ethnicity, American Indian Quarterly, American Indian Culture and Research Journal, and the European Sociological Review. She has also authored multiple book chapters, poems, essays, and opinion editorials. McKay currently serves on the national advisory committee for the Native American Student Advocacy Institute and previously held an appointment as Secretary of Education for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Thu
    18
    Mar
    2021
    Fri
    19
    Mar
    2021
    Virtual

    “Identity Across the Curriculum,” an interdisciplinary virtual conference that explores how identity informs, complicates, inspires, and challenges research, teaching and learning at the University of Mississippi, will be held March 18-19, 2021. Visit https://sarahisomcenter.org/iac for more information.

     

  • Thu
    18
    Mar
    2021
    7:30 pmYouTube Premiere

    The University of Mississippi Department of Music Black History Month Concert premieres on YouTube on March 18th at 7:30 pm. Get the concert program here.

    Featuring New Orleans Jazz legend, clarinetist Doreen Ketchens, the Ole Miss African Drum and Dance Ensemble, and the Mississippians Jazz Ensemble.

  • Fri
    19
    Mar
    2021
    2:00 pmZoom

    Date: Friday, March 19, 2021, 2:00 – 2:50pm

    Speaker: Dr. Lynn Siefferman
    Associate professor,  Biology Department, Appalachian State University
    Seminar title: TBD

    Host: Dr. Susan Balenger, assistant professor of biology, balenger@olemiss.edu

    All biology seminars will be held via Zoom. Please contact host for further information.

  • Mon
    22
    Mar
    2021
    7:00 pm

    Croft Virtual Speaker: Dr. Judith Shapiro

    “As China Goes, So Goes the Planet”

    Monday, March 22
    7:00 pm.-8:00 p.m.

    What does it mean for the rest of us when "China Goes Green"?  Is "ecological civilization" everything that it promises?  In this talk, Prof. Judith Shapiro will explore a new age of coercive environmentalism in China and its implications for how a rising superpower wields its economic and political might overseas.

    Save the date for this Virtual Speaker webinar!

  • Mon
    22
    Mar
    2021
    7:30 pmFord Center for the Performing Arts

    The University of Mississippi Department of Music presents the LOU Symphony Orchestra, Dr. Selim Giray, Director

    March 22nd, in a live-only performance at the Ford Center .

    The LOU Symphony Orchestra performs live with 2020 Concerto Competition winners Angelina Meeks and Will Hamilton on Monday, March 22nd at 7:30 at the Ford Center. The program includes a clarinet concerto by Finzi, and "Creation of the World" by Milhaud.
    Tickets are $10 ($5 if you have a UM ID) and can be reserved through the UM Box Office at 915-7411 or umbo@olemiss.edu. The audience will be limited due to distancing requirements, so get your ticket now.
  • Tue
    23
    Mar
    2021
    12:00 amZoom

    Are you interested in learning about graduate school or internships in Museum Studies?

    Join a virtual question & answer session on March 23rd at 6:00PM.

    RSVP to kfuqua@olemiss.edu for Zoom link.

    Museum Studies 2021 Q&A

  • Tue
    23
    Mar
    2021
    8:00 pmYouTube

    University of Mississippi Department of Music Virtual Concert

    Sonic Explorations
    March 23
    8:00 pm
    Featuring work composed by Stephanie Ann Boyd for piano, piano and flute, and piano and cello, performed by UM Music faculty members Adrienne Park, Christine Kralik, and Nave Graham.
  • Thu
    25
    Mar
    2021
    5:30 pmZoom

    The Mind-Body Connection and the Secret Life of your Immune System

    Dr. Staci Bilbo, Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University

    Activation of the immune system via illness, poor nutrition, or a stressful environment in youth can alter early brain development and impact adult mood, physical health, and ability to think and can influence health outcomes like obesity and drug use. Understanding how the immune system interacts with the body and brain to produce these results guides our ability to lessen their harm. Social factors like poverty, pollution, and addiction contribute to activation of the immune system. Thus, it is also important to work with communities to dampen the devastating influence of these social factors on the growing brain. Dr. Bilbo will talk about research in an animal model examining the impact of combined environmental stressors during pregnancy on offspring mental health outcomes, and how these impacts may be mitigated by targeting the immune system.

    Special time and place! Thursday, March 25, 2021, 5:30pm - 6:30pm
    Via Zoom

  • Fri
    26
    Mar
    2021
    2:00 pmZoom

    Date: Friday, March 26, 2021, 2:00 – 2:50pm

    Speaker: Dr. Staci Bilbo
    Professor,  Systems and Integrative Neuroscience Group, Duke University
    Seminar title: TBD

    Host: Dr. Lainy Day, associate professor of biology and neuroscience minor director, lainyday@olemiss.edu – Neuroscience Symposium

    All biology seminars will be held via Zoom. Please contact host for further information.

  • Tue
    30
    Mar
    2021
    12:00 pmZoom

    Lecture Title: Medical Migration and the NHS's Permanent Recruitment Crisis

    Speaker: Julian M. Simpson

    When: Tuesday, March 30, at noon CST via Zoom.

    Registration: To register for the virtual lecture, simply click on the following link: olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/regist

    Lecture Abstract: Using oral history interviews and archival research I will explore the complex nature of the relationship between the UK’s National Health Service and the medical migrants who have played an essential role in staffing it since its inception in 1948. While lip service has been paid to their numerical importance, there has been less focus on the specific nature of the roles they have performed in the British healthcare system and what this reveals about the culture of medicine and the structure of the NHS. Medical migrants need to be understood as providing ‘special’ labour rather than simply ‘additional’ labour. In the first four decades of the NHS, migrant doctors were disproportionately represented in the provision of care for the least affluent and most vulnerable sections of society. I would argue that this is the core function of the NHS, hence that they were its architects. Their presence in fields such as psychiatry or areas of medicine such as inner-city general practice was not simply the product of a shortage of doctors in absolute terms. It was about the low-status of these forms of work within the British medical profession, and the emigration of their UK colleagues who chose to shun the opportunities that migrants used to build careers. Similar patterns in the deployment of medics can be observed in other westernised medical systems and I will conclude by highlighting the different ways in which this history is relevant to our understanding of global public health. 

    Speaker biography: Julian M. Simpson is an independent writer, researcher, and translator. He has worked in a number of capacities for various organisations, including the BBC World Service, the Scottish Refugee Council, the l’Afrique à Newcastle Festival and the University of Manchester. He is the author of Migrant architects of the NHS: South Asian doctors and the reinvention of British general practice (1940s-1980s) (Manchester University Press, 2018) and co-editor of History, Historians and the Immigration Debate: Going Back to Where We Came From (Palgrave, 2019).

     

  • Wed
    31
    Mar
    2021
    12:00 pmZoom

    SouthTalks: I Don’t Like the Blues: Race, Place, and the Backbeat of Black Life with B. Brian Foster
    In the last six years, B. Brian Foster has talked with hundreds of Black Mississippians about race, the blues, politics, memory, community, and more. In this talk, he shares with us some of what they’ve shared with him, and he considers what it all might mean both now and for the future. Some of that work is included in his new book, I Don’t Like the Blues: Race, Place, and the Backbeat of Black Life, in which he considers the value of non-affirming sensibilities like pessimism, frustration, and exhaustion for how we think about Black identity and lived experience.

    B. Brian Foster is a writer and storyteller from Mississippi. He earned his PhD in sociology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and currently works as assistant professor of sociology and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi. Foster also serves as coeditor of the journal Sociology of Race and Ethnicity and is director of the Mississippi Hill Country Oral History Collective.

    Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Southern Culture

    Noon

    https://olemiss.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_nTvRpDCHRZuQLjnibBGEEA

  • Thu
    01
    Apr
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    All events will be held via Zoom. To get more information or to register, visit https://sarahisomcenter.org/events

    Join Sarah Heying, Ph.D. Candidate in English, as she discusses the importance of confronting the entanglement of shame and intimacy as a queer research practice, using Dorothy Allison’s papers as a case study.

  • Wed
    07
    Apr
    2021
    5:00 pm@Online

    In addition to the many artists the Department of Art & Art History invites to campus through student organizations, they also have an established visiting artist program called Art Talks. This program creates access to artists via webcam and in-person lectures, and it provides students access to keep pace with critical thought, contemporary artistic practice, and emerging technology used in cultural production today.

    April 07, 2021 at 5:00 pm

    Karen Barber, Art Historian

    Dr. Karen Barber received her Ph.D. at the Graduate Center, City University of New York, with a dissertation entitled “Writing with Light: Cameraless Photography and Its Narrative in the 1920s.” She specializes in the history of photography and 20th-century art. Her work has been published in Exposure and Studies in Photography. With a background in museums, she has worked in photography collections at SFMOMA, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, and the California Museum of Photography. She is currently working on a manuscript on cameraless photography and its publications in the 1920s.

    Zoom Meeting Information
    Register in advance for this meeting:
    https://olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYld-mvrj0vG9cIlLwkKpzj1Pcje8gixikb
    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

  • Wed
    07
    Apr
    2021
    7:00 pmZoom
    The Forty-Eighth James Edwin Savage Lecture in the Renaissance: “Ghosts, Devils, and the Haunting of History — or the Minister Meets his Match” by Kathryn A. Edwards, professor of history at the University of South Carolina
    April 7, 2021 @ 7 p.m. via Zoom.
  • Fri
    09
    Apr
    2021
    11:00 amYouTube Livestream

    Are you missing the community that iron pours bring? Is molten metal something that you find interesting or exciting? This Spring, the UM Sculpture Society is proud to bring the iron pour to you! Livestream 4/9 @ 11:00 AM CST via Youtube:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Po5b5FtMyzA

     

  • Mon
    12
    Apr
    2021
  • Wed
    14
    Apr
    2021
    12:00 pm@Online

    SouthTalks: “Still Worth Fighting For” @ Online

    Apr 14 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
    Black students have struggled to reimagine the university. That struggle is one still worth fighting for. In the 1980s, when the rightward momentum shook the world to its core, Black student movements offered an alternative vision. Joshua M. Myers’s presentation will look to Howard students during that era as a model for what we still might do with the university.

    Myers’s book, We Are Worth Fighting For, is the first history of the 1989 Howard University protest. The three-day occupation of the university’s administration building was a continuation of the student movements of the sixties and a unique challenge to the politics of the eighties. Upset at the university’s appointment of the Republican strategist Lee Atwater to the Board of Trustees, students forced the issue by shutting down the operations of the university. The protest, inspired in part by the emergence of “conscious” hip-hop, helped to build support for the idea of student governance and drew upon a resurgent Black Nationalist ethos.

    At the center of this story is a student organization known as Black Nia F.O.R.C.E. (Freedom Organization for Racial and Cultural Enlightenment). Cofounded by Ras Baraka, the group was at the forefront of organizing the student mobilization at Howard during the spring of 1989 and thereafter. We Are Worth Fighting For explores how Black student activists—young men and women— helped shape and resist the rightward shift and neoliberal foundations of American politics. This history adds to the literature on Black campus activism, Black Power studies, and the emerging histories of African American life in the 1980s.

    Joshua M. Myers is an associate professor of Africana studies in the Department of Afro-American Studies at Howard University. He is the author of We Are Worth Fighting For: A History of the Howard University Student Protest of 1989 (2019) and the editor of A Gathering Together: Literary Journal.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Wed
    21
    Apr
    2021
    12:00 amZoom

    The last Oxford Science Café of the semester! We will have Dr. Sabetta Matsumoto, Assistant Professor in the School of Physics at the Georgia Institute of Technology, give us a presentation titled "Knotty Knits and Evening of Math and Crafts."

     

    Dr. Matsumoto will be discussing creative crafts and math research. What can physics learn from crochet? How does a simple stitch change the stretch of a scarf, and how are modern materials and manufacturing learning from their wooly ancestors? Join Dr. Matsumoto for a talk about curvature using pattern making, symmetries using quilt squares and flags, hyperbolic space using quilting at crochet, and knot theory and coding using knits.

    For your reading pleasure, check out this linked NYTimes article on her research!

     

    When: Tuesday, April 20 2021, 6:00pm - 7:00pm CT.

    Where: Zoom! Meeting ID: 975 6831 5885 or click on the following link: https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/97568315885

    Cost: Free!

    If you are unable to attend, you can always watch the recordings on our website!

     

    Oxford Science Café: Monthly conversations about the science we know and 

    the science we don't know. Everyone is invited, and children are welcome! 

    Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

  • Wed
    21
    Apr
    2021
    2:00PM-5:00PMBryant Hall

    Invitation: Join us to celebrate spring and Rome's birthday with readings from Greek and Latin literature and safely served snacks!

    Come celebrate the Parilia, Rome's birthday and a spring shepherd's festival, on Wednesday, April 21. Drop in anytime between 2 and 5 to read from your favorite Greek or Roman author, or just to listen and visit!

    We'll be outside for safety, but will still maintain some distance, and masks are expected unless actively eating or reading at the microphone.

    For assistance related to a disability, contact Molly Pasco-Pranger: mpranger@olemiss.edu | 6629157097

    Sponsored by: Eta Sigma Phi, Classics

  • Fri
    23
    Apr
    2021
    7:30 pmFacebook

    University of Mississippi Department of Music Virtual Concert

    UM Wind Ensemble
    April 23
    7:30 pm
    Live streamed from Ford Center
    The UM Wind Ensemble is celebrated for good reason: the full, rich sound of woodwinds, brass, and percussion lends itself to stirring music. Experience it for yourself on April 23 -- live at the Ford Center or via livestream on the UM Band Facebook page.
  • Sun
    25
    Apr
    2021
    3:00 pmYouTube Premiere

    University of Mississippi Department of Music Virtual Concert

    Faculty Recital Featuring
    Dr. Adam Estes and Dr. Nave Graham
    April 25
    3:00 pm
    Estes (saxophone, bassoon) and Graham (flute) team up for a recital that explores new music and established classics for wind instruments.
  • Fri
    30
    Apr
    2021
    7:30 pmYouTube Premiere

    University of Mississippi Department of Music Virtual Concert

    UM Opera Theatre
    April 30
    7:30 pm
    Join the UM Opera Theatre for a program of scenes from opera and music theatre that feature your favorite fairy-tale tough girl, Cinderella.
  • Mon
    17
    May
    2021
    Sat
    21
    Aug
    2021
    Online

    ONLINE GALLERY

    The Department of Art & Art History will announce award winners later this summer.

    This year's Juror is Paul David Seeman. Paul is a native Texan, born in Houston, raised in Austin, and now living and working in San Antonio, Texas. Paul earned his MFA in Sculpture at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi and a BFA in studio art from Texas State University in San Marcos. His sculptures and installations are designed with passion and love. They are shaped by fire, muscle, blood, and sweat. Paul believes that medium is dictated by meaning, passion, form, and function rather than obligation. Learning to work with new materials is part of the artist's experience to Paul. His recent works are composed of cast metal, ceramics, wood, string, plastic, and of course, dancing metal. To Paul, sculpture is an engaging way to bring awareness, emotion, color, and beauty into a place.

  • Sat
    12
    Jun
    2021
    4:00 pmThe Grove

    The Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies is bringing the annual celebration of the LGBTQ community to the center of campus – the Grove.

    “Out in the Grove: A Pride Celebration” will take place June 12, starting at 4 p.m.

    For a schedule of Out in the Grove events and more information on Oxford Pride, visit OxfordPride.rocks.

  • Sun
    13
    Jun
    2021
    6:00 pmGrove Stage

    There will be four Summer Sunset Series concerts in June, with the Center for the Study of Southern Culture sponsoring the Sunday, June 13 event at 6 p.m. with James “Super Chikan” Johnson, a blues musician based in Clarksdale, Mississippi.

    Other concerts are:

    June 6 – The Soul Tones sponsored by the Yoknapatawpha Arts Council

    June 13 – James “Super Chikan” Johnson sponsored by the Center for the Study of Southern Culture

    June 20 – Blackwater Trio sponsored by the University of Mississippi Museum

    June 27 – Thacker Mountain Radio sponsored by the Ford Center for the Performing Arts and the Mississippi Arts Commission

     

  • Sun
    18
    Jul
    2021
    Wed
    21
    Jul
    2021
    Remote

    Faulkner, Welty, Wright: A Mississippi Confluence

    Due to continuing concerns related to the COVID pandemic, the 2021 Faulkner & Yoknapatawpha conference will be held remotely.

    Please visit this site for full conference details, including the program schedule and online registration instructions.

    http://www.outreach.olemiss.edu/events/faulkner/

  • Sun
    15
    Aug
    2021
    8:00PM-10:00PMKennon Observatory

    The Department of Physics and Astronomy offers astronomy open houses centered around viewings with telescopes. View the Moon, the planets, as well as double stars, depending on what is visible in the night sky during each scheduled open house.

    The current schedule is:

    • August         15   8:00 -   10:00 PM

    All these events are weather permitting. Admission is free.
    Children are welcome!

  • Mon
    30
    Aug
    2021
    Fri
    17
    Sep
    2021
    Gallery 130 Meek Hall

    Gallery 130, Meek Hall

    Closing Reception, September 16, 4:40–6:00 PM

  • Fri
    03
    Sep
    2021
    7:30 pmNutt Auditorium

    A saxophone recital with pianist Stacy Rodgers.

    Free admission.

  • Tue
    07
    Sep
    2021
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Martin Frank
    Department of Physics
    University of South Alabama

    First Results from NOνA's Magnetic Monopole Search

    The existence of the magnetic monopole has eluded physicists for centuries. The NOνA far detector (FD), used for neutrino oscillation searches, also has the ability to identify slowly moving magnetic monopoles (v < c /100). With a surface area of 4,100 m2 and a location near the earth's surface, the 14 kt FD provides us with the unique opportunity to be sensitive to potential low-mass monopoles unable to penetrate underground experiments. We have designed a novel data-driven triggering scheme that continuously searches the FD's live data for monopole-like patterns. At the offline level, the largest challenge in reconstructing monopoles is to reduce the 148,000 Hz speed-of-light cosmic ray background. In this talk, I will present the first results of the NOνA monopole search for slow monopoles.

     

    Join Zoom Meeting

    https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/91928227187

    Meeting ID: 919 282 27187

  • Wed
    08
    Sep
    2021
    12:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    Roy DeBerry discusses 'Voices from the Mississippi Hill Country: The Benton County Civil Rights Movement'

    Voices from the Mississippi Hill Country is a collection of interviews with residents of Benton County, Mississippi—an area with a long and fascinating civil rights history. The product of more than twenty-five years of work by the Hill Country Project, the book examines a revolutionary period in American history through the voices of farmers, teachers, sharecroppers, and students. No other rural farming county in the American South has yet been afforded such a deep dive into its civil rights experiences and their legacies. These accumulated stories truly capture life before, during, and after the movement.

    In this SouthTalk, coauthor of Voices from the Mississippi Hill Country Roy DeBerry will discuss the region’s history and the everyday struggles of African American residents of Benton County, who had been organizing since the 1930s.

    Roy DeBerry is executive director of the Hill Country Project. He recently retired as vice president for economic development and local governmental affairs at Jackson State University, where he also served as executive vice president and vice president of external relations.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the ongoing health crisis, many events will be virtual, free, and made accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for information about all Center events.

    Register to receive the Zoom link at https://olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMlcOivrjMuH9JR7pPlDJSu-xLHjkgaHkur 

  • Thu
    09
    Sep
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    The 90s are back, or at least we can pretend for an hour while indulging our nostalgic desire on September 9 from 4-5 pm when Dr. Cookie Woolner presents the first SarahTalk for the Fall ‘21 lineup, “‘Where the Girls Are’: Riot Grrl, Feminism, and Queer 1990s Culture.”

    Woolner, an assistant professor in the History department at the University of Memphis, is a cultural historian who focuses on race, gender, and sexuality. Her recent scholarship includes a chapter in Historicizing Fat in Anglo-American Culture and a manuscript entitled, “‘The Famous Lady Lovers:’ African-American Women and Same-Sex Desire Before Stonewall,” which is the first in-depth examination of black women who loved women in the nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries in the U.S.

    She adds that “unlike my usual historical work, this talk will be mostly based on my knowledge and experience from the time period. This will also hopefully be part of a new upcoming research project on the history of “sex-positive feminism” in the U.S.”

    When asked about the current generation’s obsession with 90s culture, Woolner says, “It seems like 90s nostalgia has been going on for quite a while; it’s been almost a decade since an interest in riot grrrl resurged, with the publication of books like Girls to the Front: The True Story of the Riot Grrrl Revolution (2012)  by Sara Marcus and the Riot Grrrl Collection (2013) zine book. Around that time the Russian band Pussy Riot was also active, who many saw as influenced by riot grrrl as well. And today with films like Moxie, riot grrrl bands are being reintroduced to young people, even though the originators are old enough to be their moms today, and some are, which was the plot of that recent Netflix film based on a novel.”

    The riot grrrl movement was more than a girl-focused punk music scene. It also heavily focused on cultural production - creating the art, music, and self-publications, like zines, in addition to holding local meetings and grassroots organizing with an emphasis on feminist issues.

    “Riot grrrl in the 1990s was primarily an analog subculture, although the internet was just beginning to come into use in the early 1990s when it began. It would not have existed without copy machines and the Kinko’s copy chain store, 8-track recorders, typewriters, word processors, wite-out, glue sticks, and the US postal system. These were the technologies that helped us create our pre-internet networks – the homemade magazines called fanzines that we poured our hearts out in and traded in the mail or sold for a dollar and stamps,” Woolner says.

    Wolner admits to being a “teenaged, fanzine-making queer riot grrrl in the 1990s myself. When asked about how the different technologies affected the movement, she said, “We also relied on personal ads and pen pal ads in music zines and for queer women, personal ads in magazines like On Our Backs, which today’s Lex dating app is modeled after. Chainsaw Records, a queer indie record label, had an online message board that was very popular with queer women into punk in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Print culture and the early internet were both important ways queer women found each other in an era when lesbian bars were still prevalent, so in retrospect, we had a lot of options.”

    The outsider status of the riot grrrl movement in a male-dominated punk scene also gave queer folx a space to express themselves that wasn’t available in the largely hetero- and bro-centric alternative music scene that dominated the 90s. While the Riot Grrl movement was a powerful influence on white women and queer folx, for some critics, though, it seemed there was not a lot of emphasis on issues that effected women of color. Woolner disputes that by reminding us that “punk scholar Mimi Thi Nguyen, [writes] about how the dominant narrative of riot grrrl highlights white women by focusing on Washington DC and Olympia, WA, where the movement first began. But there were also many women of color involved in the West and Southwest branches of riot grrrl, as local chapters opened all over the country. Bands like Emily’s Sassy Lime and zines like Mimi Nguyen’s Aim Your Dick and Slant are just a few examples of the important work by riot grrrls of color that have been left out of the simplified histories of the movement that focus on the bigger bands only.”

    Learn more about the Riot Grrl movement and its place in feminist history and in the production of queer culture by attending Dr. Woolner’s talk on September 9, at 4pm.

    Register for Zoom below: 

    https://olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMtf-CvqDIjE9KOePbt2EE5EOpatqJXFfZT

  • Fri
    10
    Sep
    2021
    5:00PM-6:00PMTrustmark Building 106 Courthouse Square, Oxford, MS

    Upper-Level of Trustmark Building on the Square. Free parking in the parking garage and parking lot. Enter through the door on the left of main entrance, go up the stairs to the venue.

    Featuring Poetry by Jacob Montalvo-Santiago

    Fiction by Vinh Hoang

    Moderated by Michael Pontacoloni

    BYOB

    Social Hour at the Blind Pig after!

    We kindly ask that if you are unvaccinated and choose to attend, that you remain masked and social distance from others.

  • Fri
    10
    Sep
    2021
    7:30PM-8:30PMOld Armory Pavillion

     

    The Center for the Study of Southern Culture and Yoknapatawpha Arts Council partner for the premiere of Mississippi Creates, an event that pairs musical performance with short documentary films, providing a glimpse into the creative life and environments of two local musicians: Tyler Keith and Schaefer Llana. This pair of films is part of a larger series that highlights artists and performers who have been influenced or inspired by the culture and sounds of Mississippi. The screening includes a live musical performance by Schaefer Llana and will be followed by a brief Q&A with the musician and film directors Annemarie Anderson and Kelly Spivey.

    Annemarie Anderson is the oral historian for the Southern Foodways Alliance. She manages and conducts oral history work throughout the South. At age 10 Schaefer Llana moved from St. Louis, Missouri, to Batesville, Mississippi, where she learned to play piano and guitar. Kelly Spivey is a documentarian living and working in Memphis, Tennessee. She holds a BFA in photography from SCAD, and both an MA in Southern Studies and an MFA in Documentary Expression from the University of Mississippi.

    Mississippi Creates is made possible by Cathead, the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, and the Mississippi Humanities Council.

    This event is free to the public and open to all ages. Bring your own chairs and refreshments. Doors at 7:30 p.m., show starts at 8 p.m.

  • Mon
    13
    Sep
    2021
    1:00 pmNutt Auditorium

    Host Nancy Maria Balach interviews musicians featured in the September 14th Voices of Mississippi Concert.

    Free admission.

  • Tue
    14
    Sep
    2021
    7:30 pmGertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts

    Concert highlighting the range of music and people from our great state.

    Tickets available here and at the UM Box Office (915-7411).

  • Wed
    15
    Sep
    2021
    1:00 pmNutt Auditorium

    Musicians featured in the Voices of Mississippi Concert work with UM Music students.

    Free admission.

  • Wed
    15
    Sep
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    IDEAS Forum: Inclusion, Diversity Equity - Advancing through Scholarship

    Speaker Lynn Woo

    Senior Research Associate, Center for Population Studies and the State Data Center of Mississippi Coordinator, Society and Health Minor

    A common perception of Mississippi, especially the Mississippi Delta, is of a place lacking in racial and ethnic diversity and culture. However, when one looks more deeply, there are populations of diverse people who have carved out spaces for themselves within this southern landscape. This talk will focus on the Mississippi Delta Chinese and how their story is woven into the fabric of Mississippi.

    The IDEAS Forum features work that highlights how inclusion, diversity, and equity are advancing through scholarship in the College. We dedicate the opening talk of the 2021–22 series to the efforts, begun last Spring in the wake of the tragic shootings of members of the AAPI community in Atlanta, to increase knowledge about the vast diversity of experiences within the Asian, Asian American, and Pacific Islander community with the express purpose of combating hate and inequity.

    Register in advance for this meeting:
    https://libarts.olemiss.edu/bamboo-and-cotton-the-mississippi-chinese/
    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

  • Thu
    16
    Sep
    2021
    7:30 pmNutt Auditorium

    Bassoonist Peter Kolkay, of Vanderbilt University, in recital.

    Free admission.

  • Thu
    16
    Sep
    2021
    4:30–6:00 PMGallery 130 Meek Hall

    August 30 – September 17
    Graduate Students' Art Exhibition Closing Reception
    Closing Reception: Thursday, September 16, 4:30–6:00 PM

  • Fri
    17
    Sep
    2021
    1:00 pmNutt Auditorium

    Accomplished bassoonist works with UM students in a master class setting. Public is welcome to observe this interesting process.

    Free admission.

  • Sun
    19
    Sep
    2021
    4:00 pmGertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts

    Featuring Renée Fleming in a conversation about music and the brain.

    Free admission. 

  • Mon
    20
    Sep
    2021
    7:30 pmGertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts

    Concert featuring the legendary performer.

    Tickets available here and at the UM Box Office (915-7411).

     

  • Tue
    21
    Sep
    2021
    Thu
    23
    Sep
    2021
    Bryant Hall, Gallery and Room 209

    With guest speaker Dr. Roland Betancourt, University of California-Irvine

    AGENDA:
    Tuesday, Sept. 21
    7:00 p.m. – Dr. Betancourt Dinner with Faculty

    Wednesday, Sept. 22
    Noon
    Bryant Hall Gallery
    Lunch Reception with students

    5:30 p.m.
    Lecture – Bryant Room 209
    Topic: “Thinking Through Medieval Categories of Gender, Sexuality, and Race”,

    Thursday, Sept. 23
    Dr. Betancourt – a.m. class visit

    Noon
    Bryant Hall Gallery
    Lunch Reception with students

    For more information regarding Religion Forum Series events, contact eastland@olemiss.edu or 662-915-7020.

  • Tue
    21
    Sep
    2021
    6:00 pmvia Zoom (connection details will follow)

    Dr. Lainy Day
    Department of Biology
    University of Mississippi

    The Sexiest Dancers are Made of the Right Stuff

    An amazing family of birds living in Central and South America, the manakins, are known for acrobatic courtship displays. Males of many manakin species attract females with elaborate dances. High-speed cameras have been used to identify the specific mechanism by which unique body-created sounds (sonations) are made and how hormones, bones, muscles, and brains support such intense dance routines. However, not all species’ displays appear to have as many dance steps or acrobatic elements. So, working with my team and with collaborators’ teams, I set out to record the dances of over a dozen diverse manakin species so we could then ask, what is the “right stuff” required to engineer specific types of athletic dancers. What type of brain and brawn is required for a pirouette compared to a moon-walk? And if displays are happening faster than the eye can see, how do we even know if we have missed something? We don’t. Allow me to reveal to you the hidden biomechanical diversity of manakin displays and throw in a bit of neuroendocrine physiology, muscular adaptations, and evolution that will eventually allow us to reverse engineer the ultimate dancer with the “right stuff."

  • Tue
    21
    Sep
    2021
    11:00 pmGertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts

    Renée Fleming works with UM Voice students in a masterclass setting.

    Free admission, open to an audience.

  • Wed
    22
    Sep
    2021
    5:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    Presenting on the work of African-American artist Fred Wilson.
    https://www.mcad.edu/faculty/anna-chisholm

    Register in advance for this meeting:
    https://olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJUvd–uqT8sHN3RqZdY_j1c0Ivt9TmosOO_
    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

  • Fri
    24
    Sep
    2021
    2:30 pmConner Hall 113

    Ennio Piano, Middle Tennessee State University

  • Fri
    24
    Sep
    2021
    5:00PM-6:00PMTrustmark Building 106 Courthouse Square, Oxford, MS

    Upper-Level of Trustmark Building on the Square. Free parking in the parking garage and parking lot. Enter through the door on the left of main entrance, go up the stairs to the venue.

    Featuring:

    Poetry by Lenna Mendoza

    Fiction by Alida Reyes

    Moderated by Joshua Nguyen.

    BYOB

    Social Hour at the Blind Pig after!

    We kindly ask that if you are unvaccinated and choose to attend, that you remain masked and social distance from others.

  • Tue
    28
    Sep
    2021
    3:00 pmAnthropology Lab (Lamar 114)

    Participate in the interactive portion of the Hostile Terrain 94 Exhibit from 3:00-5:00PM, where volunteers fill out the toe tags that will make up the collection displayed in Lamar Hall in October.

    Hostile Terrain 94 (HT94) is a participatory art project sponsored and organized by the Undocumented Migration Project (UMP), a non-profit research-art-education-media collective, directed by anthropologist Jason De León. The exhibition is composed of over 3,200 handwritten toe tags that represent migrants who have died trying to cross the Sonoran Desert of Arizona between the mid-1990s and 2019. These tags are geolocated on a wall map of the desert showing the exact locations where remains were found. This installation will simultaneously take place at a large number of institutions, both nationally and globally in 2021 throughout 2022.

    The Hostile Terrain 94 Exhibit will be accompanied by a lecture by the exhibit’s executive director,Jason De Léon, titled “The Land of Open Graves: Understanding the Current Politics of Migrant Life and Death along the U.S./Mexico Border,” in which he discusses the inherent political violence that is tied to the decomposition of the bodies of deceased migrants. This lecture will take place on September 30th at 4pm in Nutt Auditorium.

     

  • Wed
    29
    Sep
    2021
    1:00 pmAnthropology Lab (Lamar 114)

    Participate in the interactive portion of the Hostile Terrain 94 Exhibit from 1:00-3:00PM, where volunteers fill out the toe tags that will make up the collection displayed in Lamar Hall in October.

    Hostile Terrain 94 (HT94) is a participatory art project sponsored and organized by the Undocumented Migration Project (UMP), a non-profit research-art-education-media collective, directed by anthropologist Jason De León. The exhibition is composed of over 3,200 handwritten toe tags that represent migrants who have died trying to cross the Sonoran Desert of Arizona between the mid-1990s and 2019. These tags are geolocated on a wall map of the desert showing the exact locations where remains were found. This installation will simultaneously take place at a large number of institutions, both nationally and globally in 2021 throughout 2022.

    The Hostile Terrain 94 Exhibit will be accompanied by a lecture by the exhibit’s executive director,Jason De Léon, titled “The Land of Open Graves: Understanding the Current Politics of Migrant Life and Death along the U.S./Mexico Border,” in which he discusses the inherent political violence that is tied to the decomposition of the bodies of deceased migrants. This lecture will take place on September 30th at 4pm in Nutt Auditorium.

     

  • Wed
    29
    Sep
    2021
    5-7pmOxford Powerhouse

    Special Sarahfest Pop-up art exhibit to showcase work from current and formerly incarcerated individuals

    See Us Differently is a multimedia exhibit comprising bookmaking, paintings, mixed media sculptures, and graphic narratives based on Milton’s Paradise Lost and Shelley’s Frankenstein, were created by current and formerly incarcerated individuals taking free college courses through Common Good Atlanta (CGA). The exhibit is being brought to Oxford through a partnership with CGA, Emory University, and the Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies. It is also made possible through co-sponsorships with the Creative Writing Concentration program at the University of Mississippi and the Yoknapatawpha Arts Council in Oxford.

    The exhibit, at the Oxford Powerhouse located at 413 S 14th Street, will only be available Sept. 29 from 5-7 pm. A special program begins at 5:30, with a pre-recorded Zoom call of artists Noe Martinez, Janine Solursh, and Katrina Butler, who were unable to attend the show. Afterward, there will be an in-person roundtable discussion with Bill Taft, CGA academic director, Patrick Rodriguez, director of advocacy and community engagement and CGA alumnus, and Matt Bondurant, director of the UM Creative Writing Concentration Program. The event is free and open to the public. Masks are required.

    For more information about the venue, call the Powerhouse Community Arts Center at 662-236-6429. For information about the event and to request disability services, visit

     https://www.sarahfest.rocks.

  • Thu
    30
    Sep
    2021
    4:00 pmNutt Auditorium

    “The Land of Open Graves: Understanding the Current Politics of Migrant Life and Death along the U.S./Mexico Border” by Jason De LéonJason De Leon

    Since the mid-1990s, the U.S. federal government has relied on a border enforcement strategy known as Prevention through Deterrence. Using various security infrastructure and techniques of surveillance, this strategy funnels undocumented migrants toward remote and rugged terrain such as the Sonoran Desert of Arizona with the hope that mountain ranges, extreme temperatures, and other natural obstacles will deter people from unauthorized entry. Hundreds of people perish annually while undertaking this dangerous activity. Since 2009, the Undocumented Migration Project has used a combination of forensic, archaeological, and ethnographic approaches to understand the various forms of violence that characterize the social process of clandestine migration. On Thursday, September 30, at 4:00 p.m., Jason De León will present a lecture that focuses on what happens to the bodies of migrants who die in the desert. He argues that the way that bodies decompose in this environment is a form of hidden political violence that has deep ideological roots, and he demonstrates how the postmortem destruction of migrant corpses creates devastating forms of long-lasting trauma.

    Jason De León is a professor of anthropology and Chicana, Chicano, and Central American studies at UCLA. He is executive director of the Undocumented Migration Project, a research-arts-education collective that seeks to document and raise awareness about the experiences of clandestine migrants, and president of the board of directors for the Colibri Center for Human Rights, a nonprofit organization that seeks to identify and repatriate the remains of people who have died while migrating through the Sonoran Desert of Arizona. De León is the author of the award-winning book “The Land of Open Graves: Living and Dying on the Migrant Trail” and is a 2017 MacArthur Fellow.

    This lecture is part of the Movement and Migration/Future of the South Initiative, launched by Simone Delerme in 2019. An accompanying exhibit, Hostile Terrain, will be on display in Lamar Hall beginning on Oct. 15. This lecture is tentatively taking place in-person at the Nutt Auditorium on the University of Mississippi campus. Please visit the Center website for any updates to the location or format.

    De León’s visit is cosponsored by the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, the Honors College, the Center for Population Studies, the McLean Institute for Public Service and Community Engagement, the Center for Inclusion and Cross-Cultural Engagement, and the Croft Institute for International Studies.

  • Fri
    01
    Oct
    2021
    2:30 pmConner Hall 113

    Bright Osei, University of Mississippi

  • Tue
    05
    Oct
    2021
    5:30 pmBryant Hall, Room 209

    Dr. Sara Moslener, author of Virgin Nation: Sexual Purity and American Adolescence (Oxford University Press, 2015), writes about the Southern Baptist Convention's focus on abstinence-only education.  Her work continues to examine the intersections of "purity culture," male evangelicalism, race, and sex abuse.

    Please contact Dr. Mary Thurlkill (maryt@olemiss.edu) for information about 'reading groups' that discuss Dr. Moslener's writings in the weeks leading up to her visit.

  • Wed
    06
    Oct
    2021
    5:00 pmZoom (Details below)

    Dr. Kristina Killgrove will speak on 'Death Comes to Oplontis: Victims of Mt. Vesuvius Reveal Life in 79 AD'.

    Meeting ID: 997 5751 9967
    Password: Oplontis
    For questions or assistance, call 662-915-7097

  • Thu
    07
    Oct
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom (Details below)

    Margaret Cavendish on materialism and metaphysical structure

    Abstract: Margaret Cavendish is a materialist: she thinks that the only thing that exists is matter. It is easy to
    think that we know what this means and that we know what motivates a person to believe it: it means that there
    are no immaterial objects or properties, and it is motivated because restricting explanations and ontological
    posits to material things is naturalistic, parsimonious, or explanatorily beneficial in some other way. In this
    paper I argue that this is not the best way to understand the primary meaning and motivation of Cavendish’s
    materialism.
    Instead, it is first and foremost a commitment to a single-category, nonhierarchical ontology, which is to say,
    for her, an ontology of parts and wholes. As a part of this ontology, Cavendish eliminates all substance-property
    structure - a radical reductionist project that I briefly contrast with Spinoza’s reverse reductionist project. As
    usual with Cavendish, her metaphysics is fascinatingly unique but results from drawing out some of our deepest
    implicit metaphysical commitments. So on the way, I hope to shed a little light on materialism and physicalism
    more generally, as well as on the relationship between mereology and property metaphysics.

    The format of this event will be a workshop of Dr. Peterman’s paper. Requests for an advance copy of
    the paper, as well as the Zoom link, can be directed to Dr. Neil Manson (namanson@olemiss.edu).

    More information about future UM Philosophy Forum events can be found on the department calendar
    at www.philosophy.olemiss.edu

  • Thu
    07
    Oct
    2021
    4:00 pmBarnard Observatory Courtyard

    Aaron Cometbus and Scott Satterwhite will discuss the house at 309 6th Avenue in Pensacola, Florida.

    The house at 309 6th Avenue has long been a crossroads for punk rock, activism, veganism, and queer culture in Pensacola, a quiet Gulf Coast city at the border of Florida and Alabama. In A Punkhouse in the Deep South: The Oral History of 309, residents of 309 narrate the colorful and often comical details of communal life in the crowded and dilapidated house over its thirty-year existence. They tell of playing in bands, operating local businesses, forming feminist support groups, and creating zines and art.

    In this SouthTalk, Aaron Cometbus and Scott Satterwhite discuss this lively community that worked together to provide for their own needs while making a positive, lasting impact on their surrounding area. Together, these participants show that punk is more than music and teenage rebellion. It is about alternatives to standard narratives of living, acceptance for the marginalized in a rapidly changing world, and building a sense of family from the ground up.

    Cometbus has been publishing Cometbus magazine since 1981. He is the editor of the oral histories Back to the Land and The Dead End, and the author of seven novels. He earned a gold record using his teeth as a percussion instrument. Satterwhite is a historian, educator, and journalist. His work has appeared in Florida Historical QuarterlyHurricane ReviewINWeekly, and Maximum Rocknroll. He is the author of several poetry chapbooks and edits the zine Mylxine.Satterwhite holds an MA in American history and English. He teaches writing and literature at the University of West Florida.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted

  • Thu
    07
    Oct
    2021
    4:00pm-5:00pmLGBTQ Lounge, 4th Floor, Lamar Hall

    Brown Bag: Dr. Jaime Harker will discuss the Isom Center's work to create inclusive spaces in North Mississippi.

  • Fri
    08
    Oct
    2021
    12:00PM-1:00PMStarbucks in J.D. Williams Library

    Hard week? Come unwind Fridays after Class with some light conversation about the Dark Ages.

    Are you interested in the Middle Ages? Curious? On Fridays in the month of October, come hang out with others interested in "medieval stuff": UM classes, good books, board games, podcasts, movies, and (of course) "GOT."  Very informal. No prior study necessary!

    Learn more about Medieval Studies

     

  • Fri
    08
    Oct
    2021
    2:00 pmZoom (Contact Host for Details)

    Speaker: Dr. Bin Liu
    Assistant professor,  Department of Biological Sciences, Mississippi State University

    Hosts: Dr. Bloomekatz  and Dr. Qiu

  • Fri
    08
    Oct
    2021
    2:30 pmConner Hall 113

    Andreas Vortisch, University of Mississippi

  • Fri
    08
    Oct
    2021
    6:00 pmOff-Square Books, Oxford Square

    Joshua Nguyen in conversation with Aimee Nezhukumatathil about his new poetry collection, "Come Clean."

    Event to be held at Off-Square books in Oxford, Mississippi.

  • Sun
    10
    Oct
    2021
    7:00PM-9:30PMKennon Observatory

    We view the Moon, the planets, as well as double stars, though what we can see varies each month, depending on what is visible in the night sky during each scheduled open house.

     All these events are weather permitting. Admission is free. Children are welcome!

    See the Physics and Astronomy open house page for more information.

     

  • Mon
    11
    Oct
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    IDEAS: Inclusion, Diversity, Equity - Advancing Through Scholarship

    Dr. Amy McDowell, Associate Professor of Sociology

    Dr. Peter Wood, Instructional Assistant Professor of Theatre Arts

    This forum will be an informal conversation about the Queer Mississippi oral history project and how theatre can be used to creatively present research to broader audiences. Amy McDowell and Peter Wood will discuss their collaboration to meld theatre, sociology, and LGBTQ history in a classroom setting and talk about how students in one graduate seminar are using the Queer Mississippi archive to author an original script for theatrical performances.

    Register For this Event

  • Mon
    11
    Oct
    2021
    Fri
    05
    Nov
    2021
    8:00AM- 5:00PMGallery 130, Meek Hall

    Art Talks with Mellow Mountain Coalition, November 4 at 5:00 PM (Zoom)

  • Tue
    12
    Oct
    2021
    7:30 pmProud Larry's on the Square, Oxford, MS

    UM Jazz Combos, featuring, students, faculty, and friends.

  • Wed
    13
    Oct
    2021
    12:00 pmBarnard Observatory Courtyard

    Charles Reagan Wilson

    Reflecting the dramatic changes in southern society in the last twenty years, the South’s culture has been transformed. The increasing social diversity is leading to a multicultural society in which African Americans, Latinos, Asians, the white working classes, LGBT people, and others are claiming a new, dramatically different southern identity. In this SouthTalk, Charles Reagan Wilson explores how popular magazines have become a surprising carrier of this new identity to broad regional and national audiences.

    Wilson is professor emeritus of history and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi. He served as the director of the Center for the Study of Southern Culture (1998–2007) and the Kelly Gene Cook Sr. Chair of History (2007–15). He is the series editor of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, the coeditor of the Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, and the coeditor of The Mississippi Encyclopedia (2017). Frequently interviewed by such media outlets as CNN, the New York Times, the Washington Post, and southern newspapers and magazines, he has been an essayist and reviewer for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and the Raleigh News-Observer. Most recently, he served as an Obama Fellow at the Obama Institute of Transnational American Studies at the University of Mainz, Germany.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the ongoing health crisis, many events will be virtual, free, and made accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. 

  • Wed
    13
    Oct
    2021
    7:30 pmNutt Auditorium

    Recital featuring flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, and horn faculty performing with Adrienne Park, piano.

    Free admission.

  • Thu
    14
    Oct
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    Dr. Karen Tongson, Chair, Gender Studies Program, and Professor of Gender and Sexuality Studies, English and American Studies and Ethnicity, University of Southern California, will deliver the 8th annual Queer Studies Lecture.

    Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies, College of Liberal Arts, Division of Diversity, and the Isom LGBTQ Arts, Culture, and Community Development Fund

    Registration for the event via this Link

  • Fri
    15
    Oct
    2021
    2:00 pmZoom (Contact Host for Details)

    Speaker: Dr. Norris (EJ) Edney III
    Ed.D. Director, Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement, University of Mississippi

    Host: Biology Graduate Student Society

  • Fri
    15
    Oct
    2021
    7:30 pmMusic Building- UM Band Hall

    Award winning Producer, Director, Actor, Singer, and Songwriter Blake McIver Ewing, who will be serving as a visiting faculty artist in the Department of Music, will be performing an evening of songs from some of his favorite female voices from Barbra Streisand and Carole King to Lady Gaga and Alicia Keys, actor/singer/producer/director Blake McIver Ewing salutes his favorite women artists with a cabaret performance with pianist Amanda Johnston

    Department of Music, Sarah Isom Center for Women’s and Gender Studies and Living Music Resource

  • Mon
    18
    Oct
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    Dr. Mikaëla M. Adams of the Arch Dalrymple III Department of History

    Associate Professor of Native American History

    The Are You Ready? Dialogue Series seeks to provide space for participants to learn about challenging topics, listen to fellow campus community members share their perspectives and knowledge, and take away skills and practices they can implement for themselves and within their communities at the University of Mississippi and beyond.

    Registration Zoom Link

  • Mon
    18
    Oct
    2021
  • Wed
    20
    Oct
    2021
    5:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    Douglas McCulloh is an artist based in Southern California. He was one of the creators of The Great Picture, the largest photograph ever made (31 feet by 107 feet!)

    http://www.douglasmcculloh.com/projects

    Register in advance for this meeting:
    https://olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMucOqurDkqGdNDvdNFpG2TvGrOGPFwnGwX
    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

  • Tue
    26
    Oct
    2021
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Zara Bagdasarian
    Department of Physics
    University of California — Berkeley

    The latest breakthrough in neutrino physics is the first experimental evidence of the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) fusion cycle in the Sun. The discovery was possible due to the unprecedented radiopurity of the Borexino liquid-scintillator detector (Italy), employing innovative hardware and software developments. In the future, new technologies can further facilitate access to a broad physics agenda and applications in neutrino physics. Of particular interest are the cutting-edge detection techniques and novel target materials that aim to fully utilize both scintillation and Cherenkov signals from low- and high-energy neutrino interactions. The first deployment of Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors (LAPPDs) and water-based liquid scintillator (WbLS) in the ANNIE experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (USA) will be exciting milestones in the evolution of neutrino detection. Neutrino Experiment One (NEO) will be the first ktonne-scale detector built by the Watchman collaboration at Boulby Underground Laboratory (UK). Its goal is to demonstrate, for the first time, nuclear non-proliferation capabilities using antineutrino detection. Finally, the multi-ktonne detector, Theia, aims to detect solar neutrinos, determine neutrino mass ordering and the CP-violating phase, observe diffuse supernova neutrinos and neutrinos from a supernova burst, search for nucleon decay, and, ultimately, neutrinoless double beta decay.

     

     

    Join Zoom Meeting 

    Meeting ID: 919 282 27187

  • Wed
    27
    Oct
    2021
    12:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    Jessica Ingram and David Wharton

    Jessica Ingram’s Road through Midnight: A Civil Rights Memorial was shortlisted for the 2020 Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation First PhotoBook Award and named one of the New York Times Best Art Books of 2020. The result of nearly a decade of research and fieldwork, Ingram’s work unlocks complex histories of the civil rights era, reframing commonplace landscapes as sites of both remembrance and resistance—as the fight for civil rights goes on and memorialization has become the literal subject of contested cultural and societal ground.

    Ingram works with multimedia and archives to explore the ethos of communities and notions of progress and resistance in American culture. Raised in Tennessee, she received her BFA from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts and her MFA from California College of the Arts. Her work has been featured in the New Yorker, the New York TimesOxford AmericanViceWired, NPR, and as an official selection at the Sundance Film Festival.

    In this SouthTalk about her work and on Road through Midnight, Ingram will be in conversation with assistant professor of Southern Studies and director of documentary studies David Wharton. Wharton has an MFA in photography and a PhD in American studies, both from the University of Texas at Austin. He is the author of three books of photographs, with a fourth due to be published in 2022. He has taught at the University of Mississippi’s Center for the Study of Southern Culture since 1999.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the ongoing health crisis, many events will be virtual, free, and made accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the event link.

    Zoom Registration Link

  • Fri
    29
    Oct
    2021
    Sun
    31
    Oct
    2021
    Ford Center for the Performing Arts

    Book by Heather Hach
    Music and Lyrics by Laurence O'Keefe, Neil Benjamin
    Based on the novel by Amanda Brown and the Metro-Goldwyn Mayer motion picture
    Directed by Rory Ledbetter
    Choreography by Nicole Fava

    October 29 – October 30 at 7:30pm
    October 30 – October 31 at 2:00pm
    Ford Center for the Performing Arts

    A fabulously fun award-winning musical based on the adored movie, Legally Blonde The Musical, follows the transformation of Elle Woods as she tackles stereotypes and scandal in pursuit of her dreams. Action-packed and exploding with memorable songs and dynamic dances - this musical is so much fun, it should be illegal!

    Elle Woods appears to have it all. Her life is turned upside down when her boyfriend Warner dumps her so he can attend Harvard Law. Determined to get him back, Elle ingeniously charms her way into the prestigious law school. While there, she struggles with peers, professors and her ex. With the support of some new friends, though, Elle quickly realizes her potential and sets out to prove herself to the world.

    For tickets, visit the Department of Theatre & Film website.

  • Fri
    29
    Oct
    2021
    7:30 pmBand Hall Music Building

    Conlee and Hogan perform with the UM student bands they've trained up this week. Produced by the Sarah Isom Center and UM Music.

    Free admission.

  • Fri
    29
    Oct
    2021
    5:00PM-6:00PMTrustmark Building 106 Courthouse Square, Oxford, MS

    Upper-Level of Trustmark Building on the Square. Free parking in the parking garage and parking lot. Enter through the door on the left of main entrance, go up the stairs to the venue.

    Featuring:

    Poetry by Marina Greenfeld

    Fiction by Di Bei

    Moderated by Maggie Graber.

    BYOB

    Social Hour at the Blind Pig after!

    We kindly ask that if you are unvaccinated and choose to attend, that you remain masked and social distance from others.

  • Sat
    30
    Oct
    2021
    3:00 pmNutt Auditorium

    Host Balach talks to Conlee and Hogan about gender, music, and success.

    Free admission and open to the public.

  • Thu
    04
    Nov
    2021
    5:00 pmZoom (Preregister with the link below)

    Collaborations by Memphis artists Tad Lauritzen Wright and Hamlett Dobbins, whose exhibition will take place at Gallery 130, Meek Hall from October 11th to November 5th, 8:00AM-5:00PM.
    https://mellowmountainart.com

    Register in advance for this meeting:
    https://olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJ0sd-CoqjopE9JnfbQDkPM_jgodv19aswEe
    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

  • Fri
    12
    Nov
    2021
    2:00 pmZoom (Details below)

    Speaker: Dr.Rob Laport
    Associate professor,  Department of Biology, Rhodes College

    Host: Dr. Hoeksema

  • Mon
    15
    Nov
    2021
    Fri
    19
    Nov
    2021
    Gallery 130 Meek Hall

    November 15-19
    BFA Thesis Exhibition
    Closing Reception: Thursday, November 18, 4:30–6:00 PM

  • Thu
    18
    Nov
    2021
    4:30–6:00 PMGallery 130 Meek Hall

    November 15-19
    BFA Thesis Exhibition
    Closing Reception: Thursday, November 18, 4:30–6:00 PM

  • Fri
    19
    Nov
    2021
    7:30 pmGertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts

    Purchase tickets online or call the UM Box Office at 662-915-7411.

    Visit UM Opera Theatre at opera.olemiss.edu for more information about the show.