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College of Liberal Arts
University of Mississippi

Event Calendar

  • Fri
    15
    Jan
    2021
    Sun
    17
    Jan
    2021
    Intensive training opportunity for emerging artists features leading baritone, Lucas Meachem, and pianist Irina Meachem
    The Metropolitan Opera :: Salzburg Festival :: NY Philharmonic
    San Francisco Opera :: GRAMMY Award-winner
    The Living Music Institute offers emerging musicians an intensive training experience designed to help them take their professional musicianship to the next level. Soprano Nancy Maria Balach co-founded the Institute with her UM Music faculty colleague, collaborative pianist and vocal coach Amanda Johnston.
    LMI brings young musicians from across the U.S. and Canada to UM to work with Balach and Johnston and noted guest artists. This year's guest clinicians are of the highest caliber: baritone Lucas Meachem is among opera's most celebrated stars, and pianist Irina Meachem is a renowned collaborative pianist.
    The 2021 Institute will be January 15-17, 2021, and for the first time, LMI will accept applications from instrumentalists as well as singers.
    Because of Covid-19, LMI's trademark feedback and training will be delivered online. Luckily, LMI's parent organization, the Living Music Resource™, has always been committed to online experiences that connect people no matter the location, and Lucas and Irina Meachem are pros at conducting virtual performances, conversations, and events with partners such as the San Francisco Opera/Merola Opera Program.
    Not only are the Meachems acclaimed performers, they are also advocates for greater diversity within classical music. The couple founded The Perfect Day Music Foundation to explore classical music as a way to "address current issues through a traditional art form." To this end, they champion composers of color and sponsor competitions, blogs and events that hand the spotlight to classical singers of color.
    "The Meachems are a fantastic example of artists who excel in their art form, and then use that art form to make a difference in the world around them," said Balach. "They are dream partners who exemplify the concept of 'The Performer as Entrepreneur,' and their willingness to engage individually with the LMI participants is truly unique."
    This is the second year that the Living Music Institute will coach participants not only on technique, tone, and performance, but will also support them as entrepreneurs who want to put their music to work. "We will award both a Performance Winner and an Entrepreneurial Winner -- both carry cash prizes," Balach said.
  • Tue
    19
    Jan
    2021
    Fri
    05
    Feb
    2021
    Gallery 130 Meek Hall

    Department of Art & Art History Spring 2021 MFA Student Show

    Gallery 130 is open M–F, 8 AM to 5 PM. You can view the exhibition in-person, masked, and with social distancing.

  • Tue
    19
    Jan
    2021
    6:00 pm

    Invitation: Science is fun at the Oxford Science Cafe! Come and join us for a presentation by Dr. Wayne Gray, instructional assistant professor, from the UM Biology Department. He will be talking to us on "Understanding Vaccines: Preventing Diseases from Smallpox to COVID-19."

    These days everyone is talking about vaccines and hoping for an end to the COVID-19 pandemic. Vaccines are a miracle of modern medicine. At this month’s science café, we’ll address several questions concerning vaccines: How do they work to prevent disease? How safe are vaccines and why do some people have concerns about vaccines? What is herd immunity? What are the various types of vaccines? We’ll review the history of vaccines and discuss several of the more than 20 vaccines that are now routinely given to children and adults. Finally, we’ll examine the current COVID-19 vaccines and consider their effectiveness and safety. Issues regarding COVID-19 vaccine distribution will be discussed.
    When: Tuesday, January 19, 2020, 6pm - 7pm CT.
    Where: Zoom! Meeting ID: 975 6831 5885 
    or click on the following link: https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/97568315885
    Cost: Free!

    Oxford Science Café: Monthly conversations about the science we know and
    the science we don't know. Everyone is invited, and children are welcome!
    Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.
  • Wed
    20
    Jan
    2021
    4:00 pm

    Two Southern Studies virtual open houses are planned. The first option is Wednesday, Jan. 20 at 4 p.m. CST and the second option is Friday, Jan. 22 at 1 p.m. CST. Both events are opportunities for people to ask questions and learn more about the graduate programs at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture. To register, click here.

  • Fri
    22
    Jan
    2021
    1:00 pm

    Two Southern Studies virtual open houses are planned. The first option is Wednesday, Jan. 20 at 4 p.m. CST and the second option is Friday, Jan. 22 at 1 p.m. CST. Both events are opportunities for people to ask questions and learn more about the graduate programs at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture. To register, click here.

  • Wed
    27
    Jan
    2021
    12:00 pm

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) exploring the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public.

    Due to COVID-19, we’ve gone virtual. To watch the prerecorded talks, click in the individual event below or visit our YouTube channel, and register here to receive the link for live Q&A with presenters.

    In early 1960 Black students across the nation launched nonviolent direct-action campaigns in more than seventy cities across the nation, challenging Jim Crow segregation and violence. These students took courageous action knowing they would face arrest, expulsion, or even lose their lives. So why did they do it? Anthony Siracusa argues that the political philosophy of religious nonviolence was a key motivation for many. Siracusa excavates the history of this idea in his forthcoming book, Nonviolence Before King: The Politics of Being and the Black Freedom Struggle, and explains how what he calls a “politics of being” came to occupy a central place in the Black freedom struggle.

    A historian of modern America and a civic engagement professional in higher education, Anthony Siracusa works at the intersection of the community and the academy. He has written extensively about nonviolence and the Black freedom movement, and his first book, Nonviolence Before King: The Politics of Being and the Black Freedom Struggle, will be released by UNC Press in June 2021. He teaches a variety of courses on African American history, religion, and politics in addition to community-based learning courses. He also develops and administers projects and programs in partnership with communities beyond the campus to enhance student learning and strengthen community impacts. Siracusa is a native of Memphis, Tennessee, and lives in Oxford, Mississippi.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Thu
    28
    Jan
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    01/28/2021 Prof. Ellen Sletten (UCLA) will present a seminar to the chemistry department

  • Tue
    09
    Feb
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    Feb. 9, 4:00 p.m., the Department of Philosophy and Religion is hosting a webinar with Dr. Frances Flannery, from James Madison University, "Peacebuilding in an Era of Radical Right Extremism:  Where to Go From Here."  Dr. Flannery specializes in violent extremism and apocalyptic movements.  Registration is required (easy and free) and the link is included below; it's also available on myolemiss.

    You are invited to a Zoom webinar.

    When: Feb 9, 2021 04:00 PM Central Time (US and Canada)
    Topic: Dr. Frances Flannery, James Madison University

    Peacebuilding in an Era of Radical Right Extremism: Where to Go From Here

     

    On January 6, 2021, tens of thousands streamed to Washington DC to speak out against what they saw as a fraudulent election that would unfairly elect Joe Biden as President and oust Donald Trump. Among the protestors were representatives of violent organizations, including Christian Nationalists, QAnon, and white supremacist hate groups who would proceed to commit domestic terrorism by storming the Capitol building in search of Congresspersons to attack, punish, and even kill. This lecture will explain the apocalyptic roots of radical right extremism to understand what makes the ideology of violent extremism appealing to so many, what we can expect in the future, and how we can finally begin to stem the cycle of radicalization and heal our nation.

    Register in advance for this webinar:
    https://olemiss.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_7fpVVxwOR7eV_X_izFXsiA

     

  • Wed
    10
    Feb
    2021
    12:00 pm@Online

    SouthTalks: “Southern Journey: The Migrations of the American South, 1790–2020” @ Online
    Feb 10 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

    In this talk, Edward L. Ayers narrates the evolution of southern history from the founding of the nation to the present day by focusing on the set­tling, unsettling, and resettling of the South. Using migration as the dominant theme of southern his­tory and including Indigenous, white, Black, and immigrant people in the story, Ayers cuts across the usual geographic, thematic, and chronological boundaries that subdivide southern history.

    Ayers explains the major contours and events of the southern past from a fresh perspective, weav­ing geography with history in innovative ways. He uses unique color maps created with sophisticated tools to in­terpret massive data sets from a humanistic per­spective, providing a view of movement within the South with a clarity, detail, and continuity we have not seen before. The South has never stood still; it is—and always has been—changing in deep, radical, sometimes contradictory ways, often in divergent directions. Ayers will be in conversation with Ted Ownby, professor of history and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi.

    Edward L. Ayers has been named National Professor of the Year, received the National Humanities Medal from President Obama at the White House, won the Bancroft, Beveridge, and Lincolns Prizes in American history, was a finalist for the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize, served as president of the Organization of American Historians, and worked as the founding chair of the board of the American Civil War Museum. He is executive director of New American, dedicated to sharing innovative work in words, maps, audio, and video with broad audiences and the nation’s schools. He is Tucker-Boatwright Professor of the Humanities and president emeritus at the University of Richmond, as well as a former dean of arts and sciences at the University of Virginia.

    Ted Ownby is William F. Winter Professor of History and Southern Studies, coeditor of The Mississippi Encyclopedia, and author of Hurtin’ Words: Debating Family Problems in the Twentieth-Century South and other works.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Wed
    10
    Feb
    2021
    5:00 pm

    Join the Department of Classics for a bardic performance of original songs based on Homer's Iliad, with discussion following. (mpranger@olemiss.edu).

    Join us on Zoom (https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/95241795849) or for a live watch-party in Bryant 209 (maximum 30 in person; performance will still be remote).
    If you plan to watch live please register by emailing mpranger@olemiss.edu.

    For assistance related to a disability, contact Molly Pasco-Pranger: mpranger@olemiss.edu | 662-915-7097

  • Thu
    11
    Feb
    2021
    12:00 pm@ Online

    SouthTalks: “Protests in Pro Football, 1965–2020” @ Online

    Feb 11 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

    Chuck Ross’s “Protests in Pro Football, 1965–2020” talk examines both the events leading up to the 1965 American Football League All-Star game protest and the events that led to Colin Kapernick’s 2016 NFL protest. Ross will also discuss the legacy of Kapernick’s actions in the wake of the death of George Floyd and the different responses by professional sports leagues and teams in America.

    Chuck Ross is a native of Columbus, Ohio, and currently is professor of history and African American studies at the University of Mississippi. He holds a B.A. in history from Stillman College. He has an M.A. in Black studies, an M.A. in history, and a Ph.D. in history, each from The Ohio State University. He is the author of, Mavericks, Money, and Men: The AFL, Black Players, and the Evolution of Modern Football, which was published by Temple University Press in 2016, and Outside the Lines: African Americans and the Integration of the National Football League, which was released by New York University Press in 1999. His teaching interests include twentieth-century US history, African American history, and sports history. He has appeared on ESPN’s Outside the Lines and on ESPN Radio.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Thu
    11
    Feb
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    02/11/2021 Prof. Vikas Nanda (Rutgers) will present a seminar to the department

    4:00 pm, Zoom, https://chemistry.olemiss.edu/

  • Wed
    17
    Feb
    2021
    12:00 pm@ Online

    SouthTalks: “Masked Man, Black: Pandemic and Protest Poems” @ Online

    Feb 17 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

    Frank X Walker will read from and discuss his latest collection of poems, Masked Man, Black: Pandemic and Protest Poems. The poems document in real time the myriad of challenges presented by the multiple pandemics of Covid-19 and racial injustice. They also offer edifying pockets of solace as the poet shares his family’s survival tips, strategies, and discoveries in midst of so much loss, while properly laying blame at the feet of the administration that unnecessarily politicized, misled, and further complicated this country’s response to the virus. University of Mississippi associate professor of English and African American studies Derrick Harriell will facilitate the Q&A portion of this event.

    Frank X Walker is the first African American writer to be named Kentucky Poet Laureate. He has published eleven collections of poetry, including Masked Man, Black: Pandemic and Protest Poems and Turn Me Loose: The Unghosting of Medgar Evers, which was awarded the 2014 NAACP Image Award for Poetry and the Black Caucus American Library Association Honor Award for Poetry. Voted one of the most creative professors in the South, Walker coined the term “Affrilachia” and cofounded the Affrilachian Poets. He is the founding editor of pluck! The Journal of Affrilachian Arts and Culture and serves as professor of English and African American and Africana studies at the University of Kentucky in Lexington.

    Derrick Harriell is the Otillie Schillig Associate Professor of English and African American Studies at the University of Mississippi. His poem collections are Cotton (2010), Ropes (2013, winner of the 2014 Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters award in poetry), and Stripper in Wonderland (2017). His poems, stories, and essays have been published widely.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Thu
    18
    Feb
    2021
    12:00 am

    Many Crofties come into college knowing two things: they want to do international studies and they want to live in Washington DC after graduation. This panel will be made up of Croft alumni who are now living and working in DC. They will share their experiences on finding, applying, and working their way through all the challenges to get to DC.

  • Thu
    18
    Feb
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    All events will be held via Zoom. To get more information or to register, visit https://sarahisomcenter.org/events

    Shennette Garrett-Scott, associate professor of history and African American Studies, will discuss the life and impact of Mary Cordelia Montgomery Booze in our first Sarahtalk of the semester.

    About Mary Cordelia Montgomery Booze:

    Born Mary Montgomery in March 1878 to parents who had been enslaved when young, she grew up in the Mississippi Delta. Her father, Isaiah T. Montgomery (1847-1924), was a cotton producer politically allied with the famous Republican educator Booker T. Washington. In 1887, the Montgomerys moved to Bolivar County south of Clarksdale in the rich delta country of northwestern Mississippi. There Montgomery founded an all-black agricultural community, Mound Bayou, located along the Mississippi River. Mary was educated locally before going to New Orleans, Louisiana, where she studied for two years at the historically black Straight University. She returned to Mound Bayou and worked as a bookkeeper in the family business. She also taught at the teacher-training Mound Bayou Normal Institute.

    Despite state restrictions that effectively disenfranchised most blacks, Booze joined the Republican Party. Beginning in 1924, she served as a committeewoman from Mississippi to the Republican National Committee, the first African-American woman to hold that position.

  • Wed
    24
    Feb
    2021
    12:00 pm@ Online

    SouthTalks: “The Emmett Till Generation: Youth Activism, Radical Protest, and Social Change in Jim Crow Mississippi” @ Online

    Feb 24 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

    Daphne Chamberlain’s talk highlights the role of children as leaders and participants in the Mississippi civil rights movement between 1946 and 1965. This presentation also offers a new perspective on the origins of the civil rights struggle and gives credence to how instrumental young people were to engaging in radical protest and grassroots activism in Mississippi.

    Chamberlain completed her undergraduate studies at Tougaloo College in 2001 and received her M.A. and Ph.D. in history from the University of Mississippi. Before returning to Tougaloo as a faculty member, Chamberlain was the founding director of the COFO Civil Rights Education Center at Jackson State University. In 2013 Chamberlain returned to Tougaloo College, where she is an associate professor of history and the associate provost and vice president for academic affairs.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Wed
    24
    Feb
    2021
    5:00 pm@Online

    In addition to the many artists the Department of Art & Art History invites to campus through student organizations they also have an established visiting artist program called Art Talks. This program creates access to artists via webcam and in-person lectures, and it provides students access to keep pace with critical thought, contemporary artistic practice, and emerging technology used in cultural production today.

    February 24, 2021 at 5:00 pm

    Margaret Vendryes, Art Historian, Artist, and Curator | mrvendryes.com

    Margaret Rose Vendryes entered the faculty of York College and The Graduate Center in 2000. She is the author of Barthé, A Life in Sculpture (2008). Vendryes returned to York College, in 2013, as Distinguished Lecturer in Fine Arts and Director of the York College Fine Arts Gallery after a seven-year absence during which she established a successful studio practice. As a visual artist, Vendryes is best known for her painting series The African Diva Project which merges African masks with commercial images of popular black women soloists. She is currently Chair of the Department of Performing and Fine Arts.

    Zoom Meeting Information
    Register in advance for this meeting:
    https://olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIpcOCopzIuGtYAKPHbQp7w8c0Jkd8KQy2a
    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

  • Thu
    25
    Feb
    2021
    Sun
    28
    Feb
    2021
    SFA Zoom Room

    2021 SFA Writing Workshop

    Announcing the 2021 SFA Writing Workshop

    The Southern Foodways Alliance tells stories about American food culture. We commission great writing. And we foster emerging and mid-career writers whose work explores food and foodways. With those goals in mind, we are now taking applications for an SFA nonfiction writing workshop to be held via Zoom February 25-28, 2021. SFA director John T. Edge and managing editor Sara Camp Milam are your leaders. Together they bring nearly three decades of editorial experience and twenty books (written, cowritten, or edited) to the table.

    Applicants should be at work on a book or longform feature story at the time of application. It does not have to be under contract or placed for publication. The work must be nonfiction and closely tied to themes of food or foodways. Preference is given to applicants whose work is set in, or tied to, the American South. Applicants at work on a longform audio story are eligible for consideration.

    Wondering if this workshop is for you? Past workshop participants have included chefs working on their first cookbooks, journalists aiming to direct their attention to food and foodways, and academics who wish to present their scholarship to a general audience.

    Vivian Howard, chef, television host, and author of Deep Run Roots, is a graduate.

    “When I attended the SFA writer’s workshop I doubted I had the know-how to write anything other than a noteworthy email,” she told us. “But the collaborative experience of writing, reading and listening to other authors allowed me the opportunity to hear my voice in a way that validated it. The experience was a turning point that armed me with confidence, direction and community.”

    Workshop graduates have published essays and reportage in Gravy, the SFA’s quarterly journal. And they have written award-winning books that got better under SFA guidance. If you’re looking for guidance, great conversation, and time to step away from your day job and into the writing life, you’ll find it here.

    The workshop begins at 5 pm on Thursday, February 25, and ends at Noon on Sunday, February 28. It provides a mix of group discussion, one-on-one editorial consultation, and self-directed writing time. Tuition of $100 includes all instruction.

    HOW  TO APPLY:

    A complete application consists of 3 parts: cover letter, project description, and writing sample.

    Cover letter: No more than one page, telling us about yourself as a writer—previous publications, areas of interest, etc.

    Project description: No more than one page, describing your project. What is it about? Who is the intended audience? Where are you now, and where do you plan to be when you arrive for the workshop? What do you hope to gain from working with SFA editors?

    Writing sample: 5-10 pages in length, nonfiction, published or unpublished. The sample may consist of one longer piece or multiple shorter works. It does not have to be related to the project you wish to pursue for the workshop.

    Please submit your application via email to Melissa Booth Hall at melissa@southernfoodways.org. Subject line should read “[Your last name] – Writing Workshop Application.” Please attach your application components as Word documents or PDFs.

    There is no application fee. One scholarship is available. Please indicate in your cover letter if you wish to be considered for the scholarship. The scholarship covers workshop tuition.

    APPLICATIONS ARE DUE at 5 pm Central Time on Friday, January 15, 2021. Late applications will not be reviewed. Successful applicants will be notified of their acceptance by Monday, January 25, 2021.

  • Thu
    25
    Feb
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    02/25/2021 Prof. Jorge Gonzalez (University of Valencia) will present a seminar to the department

    4:00 pm, Zoom, https://chemistry.olemiss.edu/

  • Wed
    03
    Mar
    2021
    12:00 pm@ Online

    SouthTalks: “White Kids: Growing Up with Privilege in a Racially Divided America” @ Online

    Mar 3 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
    American children are living in a world of ongoing public debates about race, daily displays of racial violence, and for some, an increased awareness of inequality. Based on two years of ethnographic research with affluent white kids and their families, Margaret A. Hagerman’s talk examines how white kids learn about race, racism, inequality, and privilege in the contexts of their everyday lives. This talk explores how white racial socialization is a process that stretches beyond white parents’ explicit conversations with their white children and includes not only the choices parents make about neighborhoods, schools, peer groups, extracurricular activities, and media, but also the choices made by the kids themselves.

    Margaret A. Hagerman is an associate professor of sociology at Mississippi State University and is a faculty affiliate in the African American studies and gender studies programs there. She is the author of White Kids: Growing Up with Privilege in a Racially Divided America (2019), and she is a nationally recognized expert on white racial socialization. Her research can be found in publications such as the Journal of Marriage and Family, Sociology of Race and Ethnicity, and Ethnic and Racial Studies, among others. She has visited a number of schools and communities across the country to share her work with parents, teachers, neighborhood associations, school administrators, and young people.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Wed
    03
    Mar
    2021
    4:30 pmZoom

    The Department of Classics and The Archaeological Institute of America Present a Virtual Lecture

    ProfessorCarrie Atkins, The Department of Historical Studies, The University of Toronto, Mississauga

    “Shipwrecks and the Transport of Luxury in the Roman Mediterranean”

    https://utoronto.zoom.us/j/85949519411

    Wednesday, March 3rd at 4:30 PM

  • Wed
    03
    Mar
    2021
    5:00 pm@Online

    In addition to the many artists the Department of Art & Art History invites to campus through student organizations, they also have an established visiting artist program called Art Talks. This program creates access to artists via webcam and in-person lectures, and it provides students access to keep pace with critical thought, contemporary artistic practice, and emerging technology used in cultural production today.

    March 03, 2021 at 5:00 pm

    Ben Snell, Artist | bensnell.io

    Ben Snell is an artist who listens to and amplifies the inner dialogues of machines. Using contemporary techniques and traditional motifs, he navigates the space between creation and automation, suggesting a humanist approach to technology.

    Zoom Meeting Information
    Register in advance for this meeting:
    https://olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJcud-2trz4vE92bBQAclp9ZKEpulg7ee1A6
    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

  • Thu
    04
    Mar
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    All events will be held via Zoom. To get more information or to register, visit https://sarahisomcenter.org/events

    Join the Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies for a roundtable discussion with women chairs in the College of Liberal Arts as they discuss their own experiences and challenges. Those schedule to participate are:

    • Nancy Maria Balach - Music
    • Kirsten Dellinger - Sociology/College of Liberal Arts
    • Katie McKee - Center for the Study of Southern Culture
    • Molly Pasco-Pranger - Classics
    • Rebekah Smith - Psychology
    • Caroline Wigginton - English
    • Noell Wilson - History
    • Ethel Young-Scurlock - African American Studies
    • Jaime Harker - Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies (moderator)
  • Fri
    05
    Mar
    2021
    2:00 pmZoom

    Date: Friday, March 5, 2021, 2:00 – 2:50pm

    Speaker: Dr. Chris Muir
    Assistant professor, School of Life Sciences, University of Hawaii
    Seminar title: Global syntheses of stomatal evolution and local adaptationa

    Host: Dr. Peter Zee, assistant professor of biology, zee@olemiss.edu

    All biology seminars will be held via Zoom. Please contact host for further information.

  • Mon
    08
    Mar
    2021
    Fri
    12
    Mar
    2021
    Virtual

    https://oxfordconferenceforthebook.com/

    Founded by the Center and Square Books, the conference brings together fiction and nonfiction writers, journalists, artists, poets, publishers, teachers, students, and literacy advocates for three days of conversation in the literary town of Oxford, Mississippi.

    The 27th Oxford Conference for the Book will take place March 8 – March 12, 2021. DUE TO COVID-19, ALL EVENTS ARE VIRTUAL.

  • Mon
    08
    Mar
    2021
    4:00 pmVirtual

    Brian Foster, assistant professor of sociology and Southern Studies and the 2021 University of Mississippi Humanities Teacher of the Year, will speak on "I Don't Like the Blues: A Lesson on Listening."

    Register in advance for this webinar:

     

  • Mon
    08
    Mar
    2021
    6:30 pmZoom

    Mab Segrest is professor emeritus of gender and women’s studies at Connecticut College and the author of Administrations of Lunacy: Racism and the Haunting of American Psychiatry at the Milledgeville Asylum, Memoir of a Race Traitor, Born to Belonging: Writings on Spirit and Justice, and My Mama’s Dead Squirrel: Lesbian Essays on Southern Culture. A longtime activist in social justice movements and a past fellow at the National Humanities Center, she lives in Durham, North Carolina.

    The Lecture will take place on Monday, March 8th at 6:30 PM.  If you are interested in attending, please click here to register.

    The Lunacy Radio Hour hosted by Mab Segrest with special guests: Dr. Ralph H. Didlake, Dr. Jeni Bond, and Jay Watson will take place on Tuesday, March 9th at 5 PM.  If you are interested in attending, please click here to register.

    If you have any additional questions, please email engl@olemiss.edu.

    Mission Statement
    The Edith T. Baine Lecture Series for Scholars and Writers invites the best and brightest scholars and writers to our campus. The Baine lecturers and writers are chosen on the basis of energetic and engaged scholarship and creative work, innovative approaches, and dynamic presentation styles. The lectures showcase paradigm-shifting research and groundbreaking writing. The visiting scholars and writers are intended to expose undergraduates to the fullness of a life deeply engaged in literature while inspiring graduate students to pursue ambitious work.

    Edith T. Baine
    Mrs. Edith Turley Baine of El Dorado was born November 29, 1945 in Greenville, Mississippi, the daughter of Edith Waits Turley and George Turley. She graduated from Leland High School and the University of Mississippi, where she received B.A.E. and M.A.E. degrees. Mrs. Baine was a member of the First Presbyterian Church of El Dorado, El Dorado Service League, Phi Mu Sorority and Delta Theta Phi Law Fraternity International. She was a former member of the Board of Directors of the Union County Humane Society. She was an El Dorado Jaycettes and later became an El Dorado Jaycee. She was a tree farmer and retired English teacher who taught in Mississippi and at El Dorado High School. On April 13, 2012, Mrs. Baine passed away at Baptist Health Medical Center in Little Rock. Her generous gift to the English Department at the University of Mississippi supports this lecture series and promotes academic and creative exchange.

  • Tue
    09
    Mar
    2021
    5:00 pmZoom

    Mab Segrest is professor emeritus of gender and women’s studies at Connecticut College and the author of Administrations of Lunacy: Racism and the Haunting of American Psychiatry at the Milledgeville Asylum, Memoir of a Race Traitor, Born to Belonging: Writings on Spirit and Justice, and My Mama’s Dead Squirrel: Lesbian Essays on Southern Culture. A longtime activist in social justice movements and a past fellow at the National Humanities Center, she lives in Durham, North Carolina.

    The Lecture will take place on Monday, March 8th at 6:30 PM.  If you are interested in attending, please click here to register.

    The Lunacy Radio Hour hosted by Mab Segrest with special guests: Dr. Ralph H. Didlake, Dr. Jeni Bond, and Jay Watson will take place on Tuesday, March 9th at 5 PM.  If you are interested in attending, please click here to register.

    If you have any additional questions, please email engl@olemiss.edu.

    Mission Statement
    The Edith T. Baine Lecture Series for Scholars and Writers invites the best and brightest scholars and writers to our campus. The Baine lecturers and writers are chosen on the basis of energetic and engaged scholarship and creative work, innovative approaches, and dynamic presentation styles. The lectures showcase paradigm-shifting research and groundbreaking writing. The visiting scholars and writers are intended to expose undergraduates to the fullness of a life deeply engaged in literature while inspiring graduate students to pursue ambitious work.

    Edith T. Baine
    Mrs. Edith Turley Baine of El Dorado was born November 29, 1945 in Greenville, Mississippi, the daughter of Edith Waits Turley and George Turley. She graduated from Leland High School and the University of Mississippi, where she received B.A.E. and M.A.E. degrees. Mrs. Baine was a member of the First Presbyterian Church of El Dorado, El Dorado Service League, Phi Mu Sorority and Delta Theta Phi Law Fraternity International. She was a former member of the Board of Directors of the Union County Humane Society. She was an El Dorado Jaycettes and later became an El Dorado Jaycee. She was a tree farmer and retired English teacher who taught in Mississippi and at El Dorado High School. On April 13, 2012, Mrs. Baine passed away at Baptist Health Medical Center in Little Rock. Her generous gift to the English Department at the University of Mississippi supports this lecture series and promotes academic and creative exchange.

  • Thu
    11
    Mar
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    03/11/2021 Prof. Daniel Crawford (Virginia Tech) will present a seminar to the department

    4:00 pm, Zoom, https://chemistry.olemiss.edu/

  • Sat
    13
    Mar
    2021
    Sun
    14
    Mar
    2021
    @Online

    2021 Spring Symposium: Environments and Transformation

    Tickets go on sale Tuesday, January 19 at 10 a.m. CT.

    The Southern Foodways Alliance is delighted to announce Jon-Sesrie Goff as the guest curator of the 2021 Spring Symposium.  As a multidisciplinary artist whose work crosses different mediums and platforms, Goff is renowned for his penchant to seamlessly integrate social engagement, film, moving image, performance, photography and installation. His practice explores the intersection of race, power, identity, gender and the environment by unearthing the visceral representational value and authenticity behind the images propelled across varying diasporas.

    ***

    Join SFA for the 2021 Spring Symposium, scheduled March 13-14, 2021, when we focus on environments and transformation through the medium of film. Filmmakers ask questions that connect Birmingham’s Greek community and Choctaw Native peoples.  Expect an archival surrealist dive into the lives of the women who powered the Underground railroad.  Learn about Milwaukee as a terminus for the Great Migration.  Those questions begin in the South and span the world.

    Featuring filmmakers Colleen Thurston, Jessica Chriesman, Paavo Hanninen, Devon “Vonnie Quest” Smith, and Madeleine Hunt-Ehrlich, among others, the symposium will be delivered to your smart TV or laptop via the Eventive platform. Live Q&A sessions will offer opportunities to connect with presenters.

    Tickets, priced at $75 each, go on sale January 19, 2021 at 10 a.m. CT.

  • Mon
    15
    Mar
    2021
    Fri
    26
    Mar
    2021
    8:00AM-5:00PMGallery 130 Meek Hall

    Current faculty members in the Department of Art & Art History will have works in Gallery 130! Please practice safe, social distancing.

  • Tue
    16
    Mar
    2021
    12:00 amZoom

    Oxford Science Cafe Quiz Bowl

    Host: Dr. Gavin Davies, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy

    Join us for a night of fun and trivia! Match wits with other science enthusiasts! Win prizes!

    March 16, 2021, 6:00pm - 7:00pm
    Via Zoom

     

  • Wed
    17
    Mar
    2021
    9:00 amZoom

    Philosophy Forum: Professor Maria Rosa Antognazza and The Distinction in Kind between Knowledge and Belief.

    For details, visit:

    https://philosophy.olemiss.edu/33302-2/

     

  • Wed
    17
    Mar
    2021
    12:00 pm@ Online

    SouthTalks: “Indigenous Cultures and Histories of the Southeast” @ Online

    Mar 17 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
    The Original Peoples of the Southeast differed culturally, politically, and linguistically from other tribes across North America. The Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee, and Seminole Nations were forcibly removed from their traditional homelands and relocated to Oklahoma. In her talk, Dwanna L. McKay will examine some of the unique cultural practices and diverse histories of Indigenous Nations originally of the southeastern woodlands from precontact to current day.

    Dwanna L. McKay is a citizen of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation and an assistant professor in the race, ethnicity, and migration studies program at Colorado College. McKay holds a PhD in sociology, a graduate certificate in Indigenous studies, an MS in sociology, an MBA in management science, and a BA in political science. Raised culturally within the boundaries of her tribal nation in Oklahoma, McKay centers her teaching, research, service, and activism on an overall commitment to social justice. Her research focuses on social inequality and Indigenous identity, and has been published in numerous scholarly journals, including Sociological Compass, Sociology of Race and Ethnicity, American Indian Quarterly, American Indian Culture and Research Journal, and the European Sociological Review. She has also authored multiple book chapters, poems, essays, and opinion editorials. McKay currently serves on the national advisory committee for the Native American Student Advocacy Institute and previously held an appointment as Secretary of Education for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Thu
    18
    Mar
    2021
    Fri
    19
    Mar
    2021
    Virtual

    “Identity Across the Curriculum,” an interdisciplinary virtual conference that explores how identity informs, complicates, inspires, and challenges research, teaching and learning at the University of Mississippi, will be held March 18-19, 2021. Visit https://sarahisomcenter.org/iac for more information.

     

  • Thu
    18
    Mar
    2021
    7:30 pmYouTube Premiere

    The University of Mississippi Department of Music Black History Month Concert premieres on YouTube on March 18th at 7:30 pm. Get the concert program here.

    Featuring New Orleans Jazz legend, clarinetist Doreen Ketchens, the Ole Miss African Drum and Dance Ensemble, and the Mississippians Jazz Ensemble.

  • Fri
    19
    Mar
    2021
    2:00 pmZoom

    Date: Friday, March 19, 2021, 2:00 – 2:50pm

    Speaker: Dr. Lynn Siefferman
    Associate professor,  Biology Department, Appalachian State University
    Seminar title: TBD

    Host: Dr. Susan Balenger, assistant professor of biology, balenger@olemiss.edu

    All biology seminars will be held via Zoom. Please contact host for further information.

  • Mon
    22
    Mar
    2021
    7:00 pm

    Croft Virtual Speaker: Dr. Judith Shapiro

    “As China Goes, So Goes the Planet”

    Monday, March 22
    7:00 pm.-8:00 p.m.

    What does it mean for the rest of us when "China Goes Green"?  Is "ecological civilization" everything that it promises?  In this talk, Prof. Judith Shapiro will explore a new age of coercive environmentalism in China and its implications for how a rising superpower wields its economic and political might overseas.

    Save the date for this Virtual Speaker webinar!

  • Mon
    22
    Mar
    2021
    7:30 pmFord Center for the Performing Arts

    The University of Mississippi Department of Music presents the LOU Symphony Orchestra, Dr. Selim Giray, Director

    March 22nd, in a live-only performance at the Ford Center .

    The LOU Symphony Orchestra performs live with 2020 Concerto Competition winners Angelina Meeks and Will Hamilton on Monday, March 22nd at 7:30 at the Ford Center. The program includes a clarinet concerto by Finzi, and "Creation of the World" by Milhaud.
    Tickets are $10 ($5 if you have a UM ID) and can be reserved through the UM Box Office at 915-7411 or umbo@olemiss.edu. The audience will be limited due to distancing requirements, so get your ticket now.
  • Tue
    23
    Mar
    2021
    12:00 amZoom

    Are you interested in learning about graduate school or internships in Museum Studies?

    Join a virtual question & answer session on March 23rd at 6:00PM.

    RSVP to kfuqua@olemiss.edu for Zoom link.

    Museum Studies 2021 Q&A

  • Tue
    23
    Mar
    2021
    8:00 pmYouTube

    University of Mississippi Department of Music Virtual Concert

    Sonic Explorations
    March 23
    8:00 pm
    Featuring work composed by Stephanie Ann Boyd for piano, piano and flute, and piano and cello, performed by UM Music faculty members Adrienne Park, Christine Kralik, and Nave Graham.
  • Thu
    25
    Mar
    2021
    5:30 pmZoom

    The Mind-Body Connection and the Secret Life of your Immune System

    Dr. Staci Bilbo, Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University

    Activation of the immune system via illness, poor nutrition, or a stressful environment in youth can alter early brain development and impact adult mood, physical health, and ability to think and can influence health outcomes like obesity and drug use. Understanding how the immune system interacts with the body and brain to produce these results guides our ability to lessen their harm. Social factors like poverty, pollution, and addiction contribute to activation of the immune system. Thus, it is also important to work with communities to dampen the devastating influence of these social factors on the growing brain. Dr. Bilbo will talk about research in an animal model examining the impact of combined environmental stressors during pregnancy on offspring mental health outcomes, and how these impacts may be mitigated by targeting the immune system.

    Special time and place! Thursday, March 25, 2021, 5:30pm - 6:30pm
    Via Zoom

  • Fri
    26
    Mar
    2021
    2:00 pmZoom

    Date: Friday, March 26, 2021, 2:00 – 2:50pm

    Speaker: Dr. Staci Bilbo
    Professor,  Systems and Integrative Neuroscience Group, Duke University
    Seminar title: TBD

    Host: Dr. Lainy Day, associate professor of biology and neuroscience minor director, lainyday@olemiss.edu – Neuroscience Symposium

    All biology seminars will be held via Zoom. Please contact host for further information.

  • Tue
    30
    Mar
    2021
    12:00 pmZoom

    Lecture Title: Medical Migration and the NHS's Permanent Recruitment Crisis

    Speaker: Julian M. Simpson

    When: Tuesday, March 30, at noon CST via Zoom.

    Registration: To register for the virtual lecture, simply click on the following link: olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/regist

    Lecture Abstract: Using oral history interviews and archival research I will explore the complex nature of the relationship between the UK’s National Health Service and the medical migrants who have played an essential role in staffing it since its inception in 1948. While lip service has been paid to their numerical importance, there has been less focus on the specific nature of the roles they have performed in the British healthcare system and what this reveals about the culture of medicine and the structure of the NHS. Medical migrants need to be understood as providing ‘special’ labour rather than simply ‘additional’ labour. In the first four decades of the NHS, migrant doctors were disproportionately represented in the provision of care for the least affluent and most vulnerable sections of society. I would argue that this is the core function of the NHS, hence that they were its architects. Their presence in fields such as psychiatry or areas of medicine such as inner-city general practice was not simply the product of a shortage of doctors in absolute terms. It was about the low-status of these forms of work within the British medical profession, and the emigration of their UK colleagues who chose to shun the opportunities that migrants used to build careers. Similar patterns in the deployment of medics can be observed in other westernised medical systems and I will conclude by highlighting the different ways in which this history is relevant to our understanding of global public health. 

    Speaker biography: Julian M. Simpson is an independent writer, researcher, and translator. He has worked in a number of capacities for various organisations, including the BBC World Service, the Scottish Refugee Council, the l’Afrique à Newcastle Festival and the University of Manchester. He is the author of Migrant architects of the NHS: South Asian doctors and the reinvention of British general practice (1940s-1980s) (Manchester University Press, 2018) and co-editor of History, Historians and the Immigration Debate: Going Back to Where We Came From (Palgrave, 2019).

     

  • Wed
    31
    Mar
    2021
    12:00 pmZoom

    SouthTalks: I Don’t Like the Blues: Race, Place, and the Backbeat of Black Life with B. Brian Foster
    In the last six years, B. Brian Foster has talked with hundreds of Black Mississippians about race, the blues, politics, memory, community, and more. In this talk, he shares with us some of what they’ve shared with him, and he considers what it all might mean both now and for the future. Some of that work is included in his new book, I Don’t Like the Blues: Race, Place, and the Backbeat of Black Life, in which he considers the value of non-affirming sensibilities like pessimism, frustration, and exhaustion for how we think about Black identity and lived experience.

    B. Brian Foster is a writer and storyteller from Mississippi. He earned his PhD in sociology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and currently works as assistant professor of sociology and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi. Foster also serves as coeditor of the journal Sociology of Race and Ethnicity and is director of the Mississippi Hill Country Oral History Collective.

    Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Southern Culture

    Noon

    https://olemiss.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_nTvRpDCHRZuQLjnibBGEEA

  • Thu
    01
    Apr
    2021
    4:00 pmZoom

    All events will be held via Zoom. To get more information or to register, visit https://sarahisomcenter.org/events

    Join Sarah Heying, Ph.D. Candidate in English, as she discusses the importance of confronting the entanglement of shame and intimacy as a queer research practice, using Dorothy Allison’s papers as a case study.

  • Wed
    07
    Apr
    2021
    5:00 pm@Online

    In addition to the many artists the Department of Art & Art History invites to campus through student organizations, they also have an established visiting artist program called Art Talks. This program creates access to artists via webcam and in-person lectures, and it provides students access to keep pace with critical thought, contemporary artistic practice, and emerging technology used in cultural production today.

    April 07, 2021 at 5:00 pm

    Karen Barber, Art Historian

    Dr. Karen Barber received her Ph.D. at the Graduate Center, City University of New York, with a dissertation entitled “Writing with Light: Cameraless Photography and Its Narrative in the 1920s.” She specializes in the history of photography and 20th-century art. Her work has been published in Exposure and Studies in Photography. With a background in museums, she has worked in photography collections at SFMOMA, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, and the California Museum of Photography. She is currently working on a manuscript on cameraless photography and its publications in the 1920s.

    Zoom Meeting Information
    Register in advance for this meeting:
    https://olemiss.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYld-mvrj0vG9cIlLwkKpzj1Pcje8gixikb
    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

  • Wed
    07
    Apr
    2021
    7:00 pmZoom
    The Forty-Eighth James Edwin Savage Lecture in the Renaissance: “Ghosts, Devils, and the Haunting of History — or the Minister Meets his Match” by Kathryn A. Edwards, professor of history at the University of South Carolina
    April 7, 2021 @ 7 p.m. via Zoom.
  • Fri
    09
    Apr
    2021
    11:00 amYouTube Livestream

    Are you missing the community that iron pours bring? Is molten metal something that you find interesting or exciting? This Spring, the UM Sculpture Society is proud to bring the iron pour to you! Livestream 4/9 @ 11:00 AM CST via Youtube:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Po5b5FtMyzA

     

  • Mon
    12
    Apr
    2021
  • Wed
    14
    Apr
    2021
    12:00 pm@Online

    SouthTalks: “Still Worth Fighting For” @ Online

    Apr 14 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
    Black students have struggled to reimagine the university. That struggle is one still worth fighting for. In the 1980s, when the rightward momentum shook the world to its core, Black student movements offered an alternative vision. Joshua M. Myers’s presentation will look to Howard students during that era as a model for what we still might do with the university.

    Myers’s book, We Are Worth Fighting For, is the first history of the 1989 Howard University protest. The three-day occupation of the university’s administration building was a continuation of the student movements of the sixties and a unique challenge to the politics of the eighties. Upset at the university’s appointment of the Republican strategist Lee Atwater to the Board of Trustees, students forced the issue by shutting down the operations of the university. The protest, inspired in part by the emergence of “conscious” hip-hop, helped to build support for the idea of student governance and drew upon a resurgent Black Nationalist ethos.

    At the center of this story is a student organization known as Black Nia F.O.R.C.E. (Freedom Organization for Racial and Cultural Enlightenment). Cofounded by Ras Baraka, the group was at the forefront of organizing the student mobilization at Howard during the spring of 1989 and thereafter. We Are Worth Fighting For explores how Black student activists—young men and women— helped shape and resist the rightward shift and neoliberal foundations of American politics. This history adds to the literature on Black campus activism, Black Power studies, and the emerging histories of African American life in the 1980s.

    Joshua M. Myers is an associate professor of Africana studies in the Department of Afro-American Studies at Howard University. He is the author of We Are Worth Fighting For: A History of the Howard University Student Protest of 1989 (2019) and the editor of A Gathering Together: Literary Journal.

    SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

  • Wed
    21
    Apr
    2021
    12:00 amZoom

    The last Oxford Science Café of the semester! We will have Dr. Sabetta Matsumoto, Assistant Professor in the School of Physics at the Georgia Institute of Technology, give us a presentation titled "Knotty Knits and Evening of Math and Crafts."

     

    Dr. Matsumoto will be discussing creative crafts and math research. What can physics learn from crochet? How does a simple stitch change the stretch of a scarf, and how are modern materials and manufacturing learning from their wooly ancestors? Join Dr. Matsumoto for a talk about curvature using pattern making, symmetries using quilt squares and flags, hyperbolic space using quilting at crochet, and knot theory and coding using knits.

    For your reading pleasure, check out this linked NYTimes article on her research!

     

    When: Tuesday, April 20 2021, 6:00pm - 7:00pm CT.

    Where: Zoom! Meeting ID: 975 6831 5885 or click on the following link: https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/97568315885

    Cost: Free!

    If you are unable to attend, you can always watch the recordings on our website!

     

    Oxford Science Café: Monthly conversations about the science we know and 

    the science we don't know. Everyone is invited, and children are welcome! 

    Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

  • Wed
    21
    Apr
    2021
    2:00PM-5:00PMBryant Hall

    Invitation: Join us to celebrate spring and Rome's birthday with readings from Greek and Latin literature and safely served snacks!

    Come celebrate the Parilia, Rome's birthday and a spring shepherd's festival, on Wednesday, April 21. Drop in anytime between 2 and 5 to read from your favorite Greek or Roman author, or just to listen and visit!

    We'll be outside for safety, but will still maintain some distance, and masks are expected unless actively eating or reading at the microphone.

    For assistance related to a disability, contact Molly Pasco-Pranger: mpranger@olemiss.edu | 6629157097

    Sponsored by: Eta Sigma Phi, Classics

  • Fri
    23
    Apr
    2021
    7:30 pmFacebook

    University of Mississippi Department of Music Virtual Concert

    UM Wind Ensemble
    April 23
    7:30 pm
    Live streamed from Ford Center
    The UM Wind Ensemble is celebrated for good reason: the full, rich sound of woodwinds, brass, and percussion lends itself to stirring music. Experience it for yourself on April 23 -- live at the Ford Center or via livestream on the UM Band Facebook page.
  • Sun
    25
    Apr
    2021
    3:00 pmYouTube Premiere

    University of Mississippi Department of Music Virtual Concert

    Faculty Recital Featuring
    Dr. Adam Estes and Dr. Nave Graham
    April 25
    3:00 pm
    Estes (saxophone, bassoon) and Graham (flute) team up for a recital that explores new music and established classics for wind instruments.
  • Fri
    30
    Apr
    2021
    7:30 pmYouTube Premiere

    University of Mississippi Department of Music Virtual Concert

    UM Opera Theatre
    April 30
    7:30 pm
    Join the UM Opera Theatre for a program of scenes from opera and music theatre that feature your favorite fairy-tale tough girl, Cinderella.
  • Mon
    17
    May
    2021
    Sat
    21
    Aug
    2021
    Online

    ONLINE GALLERY

    The Department of Art & Art History will announce award winners later this summer.

    This year's Juror is Paul David Seeman. Paul is a native Texan, born in Houston, raised in Austin, and now living and working in San Antonio, Texas. Paul earned his MFA in Sculpture at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi and a BFA in studio art from Texas State University in San Marcos. His sculptures and installations are designed with passion and love. They are shaped by fire, muscle, blood, and sweat. Paul believes that medium is dictated by meaning, passion, form, and function rather than obligation. Learning to work with new materials is part of the artist's experience to Paul. His recent works are composed of cast metal, ceramics, wood, string, plastic, and of course, dancing metal. To Paul, sculpture is an engaging way to bring awareness, emotion, color, and beauty into a place.

  • Sat
    12
    Jun
    2021
    4:00 pmThe Grove

    The Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies is bringing the annual celebration of the LGBTQ community to the center of campus – the Grove.

    “Out in the Grove: A Pride Celebration” will take place June 12, starting at 4 p.m.

    For a schedule of Out in the Grove events and more information on Oxford Pride, visit OxfordPride.rocks.

  • Sun
    13
    Jun
    2021
    6:00 pmGrove Stage

    There will be four Summer Sunset Series concerts in June, with the Center for the Study of Southern Culture sponsoring the Sunday, June 13 event at 6 p.m. with James “Super Chikan” Johnson, a blues musician based in Clarksdale, Mississippi.

    Other concerts are:

    June 6 – The Soul Tones sponsored by the Yoknapatawpha Arts Council

    June 13 – James “Super Chikan” Johnson sponsored by the Center for the Study of Southern Culture

    June 20 – Blackwater Trio sponsored by the University of Mississippi Museum

    June 27 – Thacker Mountain Radio sponsored by the Ford Center for the Performing Arts and the Mississippi Arts Commission

     

  • Sun
    18
    Jul
    2021
    Wed
    21
    Jul
    2021
    Remote

    Faulkner, Welty, Wright: A Mississippi Confluence

    Due to continuing concerns related to the COVID pandemic, the 2021 Faulkner & Yoknapatawpha conference will be held remotely.

    Please visit this site after May 1st for full conference details, including the program schedule and online registration instructions.

    http://www.outreach.olemiss.edu/events/faulkner/

  • Sun
    15
    Aug
    2021
    8:00PM-10:00PMKennon Observatory

    The Department of Physics and Astronomy offers astronomy open houses centered around viewings with telescopes. View the Moon, the planets, as well as double stars, depending on what is visible in the night sky during each scheduled open house.

    The current schedule is:

    • August         15   8:00 -   10:00 PM

    All these events are weather permitting. Admission is free.
    Children are welcome!