College of Liberal Arts

University of Mississippi

2015 Faculty Grants—Physics and Astronomy

Cremaldi, L. & Summers, D. & Kroeger, R. & Quinn, B., primary investigators

Intensity Frontier Studies with Heavy Quarks and Leptons and Muon Accelerator Studies

Sponsor: U.S. Department of Energy
Award Amount: $412,000.00

We are studying rare B-meson decays and anomalies in the muon spin with high statistics. In the Belle II experiment, located at the KEK accelerator facility in Tsukuba JN, we are searching for rare decays of the B meson which can indicate violations of the standard model requiring new physics processes. In the Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab, near Chicago, IL, we will make very precise measurements of muon spin in a magnetic field. These muon measurements could demonstrate the existence of undiscovered particles or forces in our universe.

Cremaldi, L. & Summers, D. & Kroeger, R. & Quinn, B., primary investigators

Intensity Frontier Studies with Heavy Quarks and Leptons and Muon Accelerator Studies

Sponsor: U.S. Department of Energy
Award Amount: $264,000.00

We are studying rare B-meson decays and anomalies in the muon spin with high statistics. In the Belle II experiment, located at the KEK accelerator facility in Tsukuba JN, we are searching for rare decays of the B meson which can indicate violations of the standard model requiring new physics processes. In the Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab, near Chicago, IL, we will make very precise measurements of muon spin in a magnetic field. These muon measurements could demonstrate the existence of undiscovered particles or forces in our universe.

Stolzenburg, M. & Marshall, T., primary investigators

Further Studies of Lightning Initiation, Propagation, and Evolution

Sponsor: National Science Foundation
Award Amount: $209,000.00

“This project aims to better understand the physical processes of how lightning starts, how it travels through the cloud and air, and why it sometimes strikes the ground. We are using data we collected around Kennedy Space Center in the summer of 2011 with sensors that measured the electrical impulses caused by the movement of charge by each lightning flash. We also have high-speed video data (at 50,000 frames per second) for some of the flashes and weather radar data for all of the thunderstorms. “

Berti, E, primary investigator

CAREER: Physics and Astrophysics of Compact Binaries

Sponsor: National Science Foundation
Award Amount: $92,000.00

Advanced LIGO, an interferometer to detect gravitational waves (GWs) from astrophysical sources, is currently the largest scientific endeavor supported by the National Science Foundation. The primary target for the first GW observations by Advanced LIGO is the merger of compact binary systems composed of two black holes, two neutron stars or one black hole and one neutron star. The observation of these systems will start a new field of research: GW astronomy. This project addresses fundamental issues in the physics of compact binaries, such as testing the predictions of Einstein’s theory of gravity (general relativity) through GW observations. Another goal of the project is to ““put more astronomy in GW astronomy” by reaching out from the GW community to the larger astrophysics community, and by training students and postdocs in a highly interdisciplinary field that requires knowledge of general relativity, astrophysics and GW data analysis. Last but not least, a primary mission of this CAREER award is to promote scientific education in Mississippi. The award is supporting a five-year long outreach program targetting Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Community Colleges in the Mississippi Delta, with the goal of increasing the recruitment of minorities in the physical sciences.

Summers, D., primary investigator

MICE Experimental and Operations Support

Sponsor: Fermi National Accelerator Lab/U.S. Department of Energy
Award Amount: $20,000.00

This grant will allow research faculty to travel for work with the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at the Rutherford Laboratory in the United Kingdom. We will contribute to the MICE operations and the reliable operation of the MICE Cerenkov counters.

Datta, A., primary investigator

Flavor Phenomenology with Third Generation Quarks and Leptons

Sponsor: National Science Foundation
Award Amount: $25,000.00

Quarks and Leptons are the fundamental particles that make up the ordinary matter in our Universe.They come in three generations and the first generation quarks make up the protons and neutrons while the electron and neutrino are first generation leptons. The protons, neutrons and electrons form atoms that make up our world. The second and third generation quarks are leptons are rare in our  Universe today though they were present in large numbers in the past when the Universe was young. To study these particles we produce them in high energy accelerators like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva. The project investigates the properties of third generation quarks and leptons which are believed to be the ancestors of the particles that make up the present Universe.  A better understanding of the third generation quarks and leptons will add to our knowledge of the Universe- its past, present and possible future.

Datta, A., primary investigator

Flavor Phenomenology with Third Generation Quarks and Leptons

Sponsor: National Science Foundation
Award Amount: 70,000.00

Quarks and Leptons are the fundamental particles that make up the ordinary matter in our Universe.They come in three generations and the first generation quarks make up the protons and neutrons while the electron and neutrino are first generation leptons. The protons, neutrons and electrons form atoms that make up our world. The second and third generation quarks are leptons are rare in our  Universe today though they were present in large numbers in the past when the Universe was young. To study these particles we produce them in high energy accelerators like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva. The project investigates the properties of third generation quarks and leptons which are believed to be the ancestors of the particles that make up the present Universe.  A better understanding of the third generation quarks and leptons will add to our knowledge of the Universe- its past, present and possible future.

Cremaldi, L., primary investigator

US CMC Phase 2 R and D Subsystem

Sponsor: Fermi National Accelerator Lab/U.S. Department of Energy
Award Amount: 8,000.00

“We are designing a new DC-DC power converter for the CMS Silicon Pixel tracker. The CMS experiment is located at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva, CH. The pixel tracker allows scientists to trace the charged particles emerging from the decays of the Higgs boson and other rare particles at the LHC. “

Cremaldi, L., primary investigator

US CMS Phase 2 Upgrade R and D Subsystem

Sponsor: Fermi National Accelerator Lab/U.S. Department of Energy
Award Amount: 7,938.00

Quarks and Leptons are the fundamental particles that make up the ordinary matter in our Universe.They come in three generations and the first generation quarks make up the protons and neutrons while the electron and neutrino are first generation leptons. The protons, neutrons and electrons form atoms that make up our world. The second and third generation quarks are leptons are rare in our  Universe today though they were present in large numbers in the past when the Universe was young. To study these particles we produce them in high energy accelerators like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva. The project investigates the properties of third generation quarks and leptons which are believed to be the ancestors of the particles that make up the present Universe.  A better understanding of the third generation quarks and leptons will add to our knowledge of the Universe- its past, present and possible future.

Labuda, C. & Bombelli, L & Cavaglia, M., primary investigators

Proposal to Host the 2015 Southeastern Region APS Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics at the University of Mississippi

Sponsor: American Physical Society
Award Amount: 8,900.00

The Department of Physics at UM was competitively selected as one of eight sites to host the 2015 Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics (CUWiP).  The CUWiP goal is to help undergraduate women continue in physics by providing them with access to other women in physics of all ages with whom they can share experiences, advice, and ideas. The Conference was sponsored by the American Physical Society along with local sponsorship from university departments.

Labuda, C. & Bombelli, L & Cavaglia, M., primary investigators

Proposal to Host the 2015 Southeastern Region APS Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics at the University of Mississippi

Sponsor: American Physical Society
Award Amount: 3,587.00

Quarks and Leptons are the fundamental particles that make up the ordinary matter in our Universe.They come in three generations and the first generation quarks make up the protons and neutrons while the electron and neutrino are first generation leptons. The protons, neutrons and electrons form atoms that make up our world. The second and third generation quarks are leptons are rare in our  Universe today though they were present in large numbers in the past when the Universe was young. To study these particles we produce them in high energy accelerators like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva. The project investigates the properties of third generation quarks and leptons which are believed to be the ancestors of the particles that make up the present Universe.  A better understanding of the third generation quarks and leptons will add to our knowledge of the Universe- its past, present and possible future.